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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2008
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    Question Swelling on lower chest

    Last week my yearling gelding had a small "pouch" of fluid between his front legs on his lower sternum. It was cold and soft about plum size, but no form to it. He was otherwise acting fine. After a few days out of town, last night he came in with hot and tight swelling now spreading up midway his chest/sternum from between his legs. He was acting somewhat aggitated. His temp slightly elevated to 101.9, no other symptoms. I went ahead and gave banamine and kept up last night due to the cold rain. This morning it is a bit softer, not as hard and tight.

    any ideas? I have checked him for ticks and found none. Not sure how worried I should be or if this warrants a vet call.
    Thanks in advance...



  2. #2
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    Oct. 26, 2007
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    San Jose, Ca
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    Pigeon Fever?

    I think this warrants a call to the vet. Sure sounds like he has an infection.

    Pigeon Fever Horse Disease Outbreaks Increase With Drought



  3. #3
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    This crossed my mind, but no other symptoms? No history of cough or respiratory? Does it just present as swelling?



  4. #4
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    I added links to my post, from AAEP

    The first sign owners usually notice is swelling of the chest or abdomen. The horse might have a fever (temperature grater then 101.5 F), but he usually exhibits a normal attitude and appetite. An affected animal might be sore at the walk, usually after swelling and abscess of his chest and abdomen have occurred.



  5. #5
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    Thanks, I will see how he is this evening and call the vet tomorrow



  6. #6
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    May. 21, 2008
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    Pigeon Fever abscesses have a kind of fatty "wall" around them, the body's way of encapsulating the bacteria. With my horses, I could feel this hard wall and as the abscess got ready to burst, the center would become soft. When it was ready to rupture (or lance) the center would take on the consistency of a water bed, kind of soft and jiggly like Jello. Anyway, something for you to pass your time checking for while you wait for the vet to arrive, LOL.



  7. #7
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    Feb. 18, 2012
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    knee deep in Oregon mud
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    Quote Originally Posted by Watermark Farm View Post
    Pigeon Fever abscesses have a kind of fatty "wall" around them, the body's way of encapsulating the bacteria. With my horses, I could feel this hard wall and as the abscess got ready to burst, the center would become soft. When it was ready to rupture (or lance) the center would take on the consistency of a water bed, kind of soft and jiggly like Jello. Anyway, something for you to pass your time checking for while you wait for the vet to arrive, LOL.
    I couldn't have said it better myself; although I don't know that I ever want to eat jello again after the visual I just got
    It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
    Theodore Roosevelt



  8. #8
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    Mar. 31, 2012
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    Coastal NC
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    Default

    My mare did the same thing this summer. After getting a couple of responses on Coth I waited a couple of days and it went away. It was kind of like a man boob. There were no other symptoms associated it. She ate, drank and seemed fine otherwise.



  9. #9
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    Nov. 12, 2008
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    I googled pigeon fever images and it doesn't look like that.
    Here is a picture if you can see it : https://fbcdn-photos-a.akamaihd.net/...28957388_n.jpg



  10. #10
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    It could still be pigeon fever. Normally it looks more like a wad or ball in the low chest and is not as uniform as yours, but you never know. My two year old just had a HUGE abcess above the point of her shoulder in the neck crease, which is not typical. It was there for TWO weeks before we lanced it, and it's still not draining great.

    Depending on where you are, pigeon fever is out there, and it's looking a little different. There is a different strain.

    This is my second two year old to get it. Neither had a fever or were lethargic.

    If it's not ready to pop, you can try hot compresses to get it to come up. The vet can't do much if it's not ready to come up.



  11. #11
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    Swelling has gone done some. Still firm between his front legs. He is still acting normal otherwise.
    https://fbcdn-photos-a.akamaihd.net/...69249738_n.jpg
    (Not sure if this link will work)



  12. #12
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    Oct. 25, 2008
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    I really want to know what this turns out to be. My trainers horse has got something almost identical going on for months now with weight loss. Blood work and cultures have not been very conclusive.
    Honey Badger don't give a s*#^!

    "..a three-day event is not a test of speed and endurance, it is a test of character" ~JW



  13. #13
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    It still looks like pigeon fever. Even more so now, though odd it would be smaller.

    It could be he just got kicked in the chest, had swelling, and it's slowly going away.

    My four year had a uniboob over the summer that looked like that for about 4 weeks that was not pigeon fever (she'd had it has a two year old) and never bothered her. It just went away.



  14. #14
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    Sep. 15, 2008
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    The elevated temp is something you should not ignore, no matter what that chest swelling does. Keep taking your horses temp and get the vet out. Hard to believe it would be a kick in the chest along with a temp.



  15. #15
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    102 is not necessarily that elevated. What is "normal" is a bigger range than you think. Also, the time of day and how hot it was make a difference.

    Is it still 102 after two days, or was that just the one time. That should tell you something.



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