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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2012
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    69

    Default Pros/Cons of Individual Run-Outs for Each Stall?

    (see title)

    This is the best picture I could find off google:
    http://www.arisingstareqcenter.com/P1010041.jpg

    General pros/cons?

    Are individual run-outs more labor intensive to maintain?
    Are horses also turned out in larger pastures?
    Would you build a new barn with individual run-outs? Why/why not?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,088

    Default

    I can't think of a con. I have 40 foot runs off of my stalls, and they can open up to a large turnout area with gates at the end of the runs. I leave them open most of the time, but have had occasion to keep a horse contained when bringing in a new horse, or to rehab/rest a horse. They have the option to come and go as they please most of the time, and it works really well for me and my little herd.

    I'm trying to think of a reason not to do it if you have the room.

    Nope, can't think of one.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2009
    Posts
    656

    Default

    I have a set up similar to your pic. For me the pros outweigh the cons.
    Pros: horse not locked up in little box, they seem to really like the choice of being in or out. (even in nasty weather)
    Luckily for me, all but one of mine poops out there, easy to just scoop it up in the sand.
    Unfortunately for me my barn area is a low spot on my property, my paddocks are slightly lower than my stall floors, so it keeps the actual stall from flooding.
    As a breeding facility, it gives my mares the choice of foaling inside or out, but in a controlled safe area.
    My horses just seem happier and they don't have any bad stall habits/vices.

    cons: If you get one that pees out there a lot, it can smell. Thankfully I have only ever had 1 that did that.
    All that wonderful pooping outside means I slowly am taking out sand too, and about every 5 years or so I need to put a bit back in.

    Yes, mine all get turned out in a larger pasture all night or day depending on the time of year. The only way I would not do the little "runs" again, would be if I had more land where they could stay out even more without destroying my pasture. My stalls have doors if I need to lock someone in. Mine are 2 sizes, for a regular stall they are 24' long and 16' wide(my stalls are 12 x 16) And for the larger foaling stalls they are 30' long x's the width of the stall. Mine are also board fence, not the metal pipe in your pic.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,267

    Default

    If you are building, make sure you put double dutch doors going into the stall so if one needs to be more confined/stall rest, you can close them in. Also have a gate on the end of the run, so in event of a fire, you can remove the horse from outside.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    16,255

    Default

    I would not have stalls any other way. Dutch doors just in case you have to lock someone in.

    The only cons I can see are if you don't really have enough space to make it work, or if weather blows in due to the way the barn is situated. Bedding does also get walked outside a bit, I suppose.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    260

    Default

    I love them. easier to keep stalls clean since they spend quite a bit of time out in their runs, and my mare loves being outside in her run. plus its just nice to know that on a nice night they get to be out in the fresh air while still having the option of a stall.

    the only con for me is sometimes if they get riled up they can go out the stall/run door opening at a funky angle while running in and out and take a chunk out of their hip.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    5,786

    Default

    Cons: Somewhere cold, you get a draft even if you try to close up the barn with dutch doors. If you have horses who are persnickety, you get fighting over fencelines sometimes.

    Pros: Somewhere hot, you get more airflow all the time. Plus all mentioned above. Horses get more interaction/socialization if you can't have group turnout than in just a barn situation.

    The picture shows a fairly typical basic type of setup for this area, though the pens are larger than people often have. Because of the tendency toward lower energy type horses folks don't get the need for turnout or why constant movement is good for the health of their horses and since we're in the desert without grass just keep them in what are usually 12x24 pens.


    We have a 6 stall barn, and 4 horses. There are 4 runs and we made them as large as we could make them - on the larger half of the property, 30' from the property per zoning restrictions, leaving room for the driveway. The "small" runs are a 24'x80' and a 36'x80'. The other two are about an acre each. We don't have grass here, so didn't have overgrazing concerns, but we did want to make sure horses didn't ever really have to be locked in.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,630

    Default

    Gotta admit I like the individual turnout my boarding barn does. I've always been on the eastern side of the country where horses ran out in big bands, or if in a small paddock or special needs situation, four or five horses minimum. When I moved here, everyone did individual turnout. I like it. The facility I'm at has individual turnouts attached to stalls, and with our wet weather, I'm not a super huge fan, though it is nice in the summer. In the winter you get this sometimes, which is mucky and icky and not fun to walk through to go get your horse.

    But feeding is way simpler with no turning horses in/out. Just shut gates!
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    525

    Default

    I'm sticking some 50' runs on my new barn. With 12' overhangs. With -- get this -- skylights in the overhangs! I'm wack, I know! But without the skylights the overhangs would block too much light inside the barn. Horribly, owing to funky property layout, they won't connect to a larger pasture, and the only time my mares will use them -- or indeed, be inside their palatial new barn at all -- are those 6 days every winter when it's pouring down rain.

    As for cons, the price of course. You got yer Dutch doors, and all that fence -- which has to be expensive, hard-core fence because of the confinement issues -- plus the gates at the ends, (in my case) skylights, grading, drainage, roof gutters (you don't want your runs flooding) and footing: in the end, I'm practically building an indoor arena.

    But I'll bet nobody who could afford it ever said, "dang, I wish I didn't have those handy runs off my barn."



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,186

    Default

    I love individual runs off the stalls. I also have overhangs on both sides of the barn, it provides even more shade and protection from the weather. I also don't allow the horses access to their stalls 24/7 because they all tend to use it as their personal bathrooms. With the overhangs, I don't worry about them being caught in bad weather.

    My runs are different configurations because they all lead to private pastures (or in 1 case, a shared pasture). I never have to lead horses in/out of pastures and it also allows access to the overhangs when they're out on pasture.

    I agree with the poster who mentioned over the fence fighting/playing. I would put in 6 ft fencing in the paddock areas to help prevent that if possible.

    My website below shows pictures of my setup.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,480

    Default

    It's a very nice set-up to have. More so for boarding...and if you have larger turnouts, connect those to the run outs. A HUGE labor and time saver for multiple horses is not having to lead them all around for turning them in or out. Also reduces the "loose horse" problem if you have staff. And reduces stall cleaning/bedding.

    I would definitely do overhangs too if possible. Enormous benefit there too. And add a small step-over lip/curb to the ground between stall and run out. Keeps horses from dragging bedding outside all the time and keeps puddles from draining into the stalls.
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    I think fencing makes a big difference. In TX we had pipe fence for our runs and it worked great although it was more maintenance (painting). Boarded at a place up here that had a similar setup but was using hot wire rope fencing. Was awful. Horses got hurt frequently.

    I wouldn't be a fan of that being the ONLY turnout, but it really works out well if you have horses that need to be separated to feed, have someone on layup, etc.
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2003
    Location
    canada
    Posts
    1,265

    Default

    I'll be the lone person to say that I really don't like individual runs. I think in all but the most pristine facility they end up making the place look junky. Those fences take a lot more abuse than a normal sized turnout, plus the whole side of your building is available to be kicked chewed and otherwise abused by your horses.
    In cold climates individual doors to outside on each stall create a really uncomfortable draft at floor level that is nearly impossible to avoid. Snow and ice get trapped in the door making them hard to close sometimes. Plus it can create mud and a really unpleasant area right next to your building which is bad for your foundation and overall upkeep.
    I also agree withthe other poster who has seen horses bang their hip constantly going in and out.

    I would never have runs, mostly because of the climate but secondly because of the wear and tear on the building and finally because of the aesthetic. Most barns here have individual turnouts that are away from the barn.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2012
    Posts
    82

    Default

    [QUOTE=mkevent;6613395...

    I agree with the poster who mentioned over the fence fighting/playing. I would put in 6 ft fencing in the paddock areas to help prevent that if possible.

    [/QUOTE]

    Get rid of the fences-I find the fighting would be to a minimal once the horses get settled and apprioriately introduced. My barn all has individual turnouts from dutch doors that opens into larger turnouts.

    IMO-Nothing is more pleasurable than watching horses play and groom together as if out in nature.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    I don't like individual runs for each stall. Why?
    -Horses fighting over fence lines, too much drama
    -If you are in a wet area you are going to have a very hard time keeping the footing in those runs in reasonable condition.
    -Runs are dirty, even if you pick the manure that's a lot of urine all going in one spot.

    That having been said I get it that runs are very handy for large boarding facilities where there isn't much turnout (they sure are a step up above stall only board), for layup situations, and also for situations where the horse still gets some other t/o but the run is used as an extra option in bad weather or when the fields need to be rested.

    For a run to be safe for foaling out mares you would need a safer (more solid) type of fence for the run and you'd have to be very careful about neighboring horses. Personally I would find a moderately-heavily used run too dirty for a foaling mare.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Lorena, Texas
    Posts
    4,114

    Default

    I love them - it keeps my horses happier.

    BUT a couple of people have said the horses fight over the fence and htey're harder to maintain, and I've had that problem. My runs are made with panels and capped t-posts. Came home the other night to find one of them torn up as it appears the two horses decided to see who was tougher and got into an argument.

    However even with the maintenance, I'll keep them. Makes my guys happier when they're in and makes the stalls for several of them easier to clean (because they go out in the run and it is easier to scoop up the mess than to have to shift through shavings).
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  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,946

    Default

    I have individual runs off stalls at home and have boarded in several places with them. Here in the wet PNW, they are great if properly done and maintained. If you just put up fencing, do nothing for the ground, and let horses out, it becomes a mud pit quick. If you don't pick up manure, they get gross. So if you do individual runs here (other areas with drier climates are different) you must commit to good installation and proper ongoing cleaning and maintenance.

    The runs here often aren't the only turnout. For mine, horses have stalls which open to an overhang, which opens to the gravel paddock. Those are available anytime they are "in" unless weather (ice) or injury makes me limit them to just stall or stall/overhang. Then I have pasture turnout available as well, which is seasonal use only. I used to let them come and go (so if on pasture, they could come back in to dry paddock/stall at will) but I no longer do that as I found they dragged mud from the pasture that logged up my gravel.

    I have found that my horses are a lot happier in situations where they have runs attached, even if small, than when in stall only situations (both still got day turnout too. When looking at boarding, having runs off the stall is a plus factor for me, as long as grass turnout was also available. Or at least, larger turnout as the runs here are usually pretty small (12x18 at one place, but again, only in at night and bad weather and with additional big turnout during day).



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2010
    Location
    SE VA
    Posts
    1,194

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by winter View Post
    I'll be the lone person to say that I really don't like individual runs. I think in all but the most pristine facility they end up making the place look junky. Those fences take a lot more abuse than a normal sized turnout, plus the whole side of your building is available to be kicked chewed and otherwise abused by your horses.
    In cold climates individual doors to outside on each stall create a really uncomfortable draft at floor level that is nearly impossible to avoid. Snow and ice get trapped in the door making them hard to close sometimes. Plus it can create mud and a really unpleasant area right next to your building which is bad for your foundation and overall upkeep.
    I also agree withthe other poster who has seen horses bang their hip constantly going in and out.

    I would never have runs, mostly because of the climate but secondly because of the wear and tear on the building and finally because of the aesthetic. Most barns here have individual turnouts that are away from the barn.

    Winter, you are not alone. I agree that they really do look junkey and dirty.

    My siggy has links to my barn, I am very happy with how it looks, and if we had runs off all the stalls, it would look gross. Also because it is block, the foundation being undermined would be a concern. Also with a block barn the construction is much more tedious and prone to getting cracks in the joints.

    In my area, I can not think of a single boarding barn that has runs. Our winters are pretty soggy, and I can see them being giant mus pits unless you wanted to get super fancy (expensive) with your drainage system.

    The risk of fire is always there I suppose, but my barn being block inside and out (stall dividers are also block), the risk of fire is lower than that of a wood barn, so we didn't feel that fire escapes were really all that necessary. I am sure I will be poo-poo'ed for that statement, but that's ok.

    I can certainly see how they could be useful in a more arid climate.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2011
    Posts
    815

    Default

    Make me the third that doesnt like them.

    We have clay here and once the clay gets wet, no amout of pea gravel will ever keep you out of the mud. If you got soil stabilization grids, maybe it would work, but then you're talking $2.50 - $3.50 sqft. So for a 50' x 12' run in, thats $1500. Times that by however many stalls you have. Adds up quick ($1500 would go a ways to even hiring someone to take horses in/ out ) I would rather spend the 5 minutes walking my horses to their field and have nice fluffy grass around my barn.

    Just me!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
    Posts
    1,982

    Default

    I boarded, briefly, at a place that had them. They were basically little drag strips, so the horses could get up just enough of a head of steam to blast down to the end, do a rollback, and blast back up toward the barn, racing their neighbor. Scary. The part I can't quite remember was that some of them were double-wide, so two stalls opened into one run, and some were singles. All had gates at the far end that could be opened into a larger paddock area. Fencing was that weird 70's (60's?) metal posts in concrete with springs and cables. I have the most vivid memory of my gelding playing stallion and drag-racing up and down the run, staking his claim to His Mare when another gelding was turned out beside them.



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