The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 55 of 55
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2002
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    4,596

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post

    What are you implying about Canada & ponies!!!
    ???
    Daventry is a fine pony breeder
    Thanks. I'll gladly take the pony and fix him. (I know the poster was taking about the auctions in Canada though )

    And to the poster that said it can't be pain because he would have been bucking at home too if it was pain...you bet it could all of a sudden manifest into a buck at a show and not at home first! OP already stated it was a cool fall morning and got on to school the pony, even though that is not the norm, in case he was a bit fresh due to the weather. I find the show ring heightens things as compared to schooling at home.

    If the saddle fit had been getting progressively worse and he's just been putting up with it at home up until now, a show, being a bit fresh on a cool fall day and getting more saddle time all day as compared to, say, a one hour lesson at home could certainly make him state his case loud and clear. Sure, some horses and ponies would try and warn everybody by head shaking, tail swishing, etc. first, before progressing to the bucking stage...but some do not! And, some do try and communicate with subtle signs first only to be completely ignored by everyone. It's possible he was tail swishing or showing other signs and it went unnoticed.

    And please do not get a "pro rider" out to check saddle fit. I know many top pro riders who think they know saddle fit...but really don't know everything about the technical side of saddle fitting. You need to get a well known, well respected saddle fitter out who has credentials and lots of experience.
    www.DaventryEquestrian.com
    Home of Welsh Pony, ISR/Oldenburg & RPSI pony stallions Daventry's Power Play, Goldhills Brandysnap LOM & Alvesta Picasso
    Also home to www.EquineAppraisers.com



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,606

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daventry View Post
    Thanks. I'll gladly take the pony and fix him. (I know the poster was taking about the auctions in Canada though )
    We have a Welsh Cob that receives alot of admiring glances/remarks & people always ask about his breeding, I tell them to call you instead



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2002
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    4,596

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    We have a Welsh Cob that receives alot of admiring glances/remarks & people always ask about his breeding, I tell them to call you instead
    You have one of our Cobs?
    www.DaventryEquestrian.com
    Home of Welsh Pony, ISR/Oldenburg & RPSI pony stallions Daventry's Power Play, Goldhills Brandysnap LOM & Alvesta Picasso
    Also home to www.EquineAppraisers.com



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,606

    Default

    No - if we'd actually been horse shopping, I'd've definitely called: this guy although nicely made was a mental disaster: he's a bit of a glamor boy though & garners attention, so I use that to direct people to reputable Welsh breeders ... strangely my fav saddle fitter guessed where he was from



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2002
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    4,596

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    No - if we'd actually been horse shopping, I'd've definitely called: this guy although nicely made was a mental disaster: he's a bit of a glamor boy though & garners attention, so I use that to direct people to reputable Welsh breeders
    Aw, thanks.
    www.DaventryEquestrian.com
    Home of Welsh Pony, ISR/Oldenburg & RPSI pony stallions Daventry's Power Play, Goldhills Brandysnap LOM & Alvesta Picasso
    Also home to www.EquineAppraisers.com



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2011
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daventry View Post
    :
    And to the poster that said it can't be pain because he would have been bucking at home too if it was pain...you bet it could all of a sudden manifest into a buck at a show and not at home first! OP already stated it was a cool fall morning and got on to school the pony, even though that is not the norm, in case he was a bit fresh due to the weather. I find the show ring heightens things as compared to schooling at home.
    My point was that OP stated that the kid had also been hacking the pony around the grounds and in the schooling rings all day as well with no problem, but then every time she went into the show ring he repeated the behavior, and with no warning (IE tail swishing, ear pinning, etc) beforehand. To me that just doesn't sound like pain - it sounds more like he's sick of being in the show ring, learned a new trick and is repeating it every time he's back in the show ring. Every time I've seen a horse or pony act out in pain, there's almost always been some warning (even if minor) first. The one thing she said she changed on that day was his schooling routine, so that's most likely the culprit for his sudden change in behavior, all other things being constant.



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
    Posts
    4,567

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OGSponymom View Post
    Every time I've seen a horse or pony act out in pain, there's almost always been some warning (even if minor) first. The one thing she said she changed on that day was his schooling routine, so that's most likely the culprit for his sudden change in behavior, all other things being constant.
    Not always true. A lot of horses will put up with a lot without much complaint until pushed past a breaking point. For this pony, the breaking point that triggered the pain reaction might have been the show ring. It's also hard to say if there were other signs before the blow up(s) because we were not there.

    Just generally speaking, weird changes in behavior are usually related to pain. Even if the behavior changes seem situational.



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2002
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    4,596

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OGSponymom View Post
    My point was that OP stated that the kid had also been hacking the pony around the grounds and in the schooling rings all day as well with no problem, but then every time she went into the show ring he repeated the behavior, and with no warning (IE tail swishing, ear pinning, etc) beforehand.
    Yes, but as far as a pinched saddle (for example) goes, simply hacking the pony all day is very different than landing off of a jump If I remember correctly, the pony always bucked the kid off in the middle of a line. Who knows, maybe the pony has finally had enough, but with a new saddle being in the picture and the new strange behavior, it's worth it to investigate all avenues before writing the pony off.
    www.DaventryEquestrian.com
    Home of Welsh Pony, ISR/Oldenburg & RPSI pony stallions Daventry's Power Play, Goldhills Brandysnap LOM & Alvesta Picasso
    Also home to www.EquineAppraisers.com



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2011
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    72

    Default

    She said he did the same thing in the hack as well. I agree, first and foremost eliminate any possible causes of pain, and certainly don't write a good pony off because of one instance of bad behavior, whatever the cause. I still think it's an issue with overschooling in this case, but that doesn't mean the saddle fit shouldn't be checked - though I thought the OP had stated that the saddle fit had been checked. It seems like going from "no prep" at all other shows to schooling by trainer, showing with trainer, schooling with kid, and then showing with kid in this show could very realistically be a cause of this change in behavior.



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Clearly cannot be fixed. Pack pony up and send directly to me. Dirt cheap. While kiddo is heartbroken & you are angry.

    Great insight in this thread. Pony is clearly going to rather extreme, very public measures to tell you something. (Probably a combination of things hurt, I'm sick of this, and look it worked.) You now need to figure out what it is.

    This is also where you will find out that kiddo is a horsewoman, can be tough and resourceful and learn and come back, having had the no-good-very-bad-day that necessarily comes with being a horsewoman. The ribbons mean more once you've had a day like this than they ever did before.

    Or she'll quit and you can send pony to me.
    At all times, we are either training or untraining.
    Flying Haflinger blog: http://flyinghaflinger.blogspot.com/ Flying Irish Draught blog: http://flyingirishredhead.blogspot.com/



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2008
    Posts
    346

    Default

    Please check for EPM and Lyme disease. We know from experience. Absolutely same situation you describe. Now that our ponies are better, we think that the "saint" in them allowed them to function normally in most situations but the combination of jumping and show atmosphere made the neurological and physical needs (however subtle) unbearable. Good luck to you, the kid, and the kid's parents. Beloved pony is trying to tell you something. Good character building experience for the kid to stick by her pony & help figure it out. As long as she stays safe. And it sounds like you have a good handle on that.



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 1999
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    3,215

    Default

    Why are you so angry and the kid "heartbroken" because the pony had one bad day out of over 2 years of perfect days? It's important to find out what's going on with the little guy but also a teaching opportunity that horses are living, breathing animals, not machines.



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2003
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    5,350

    Default

    Does this pony show all year (3 seasons can be a loooooong time) or does he get a "winter" break from showing? It's possible he's just had enough of the show ring and is telling you he needs a break (once you've ruled out any pain).
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!



  14. #54
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2003
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    2,987

    Default

    i swear something was mentioned about this show being one where the kid "moved up", or did I read that wrong? I still think this might have something to do with what happened......

    Whether the move up exacerbated pain, or something else...I think if this did happen, a new division that results in a sudden change in behavior should be looked at.
    Save a life...be an organ donor! Visit www.Transplantbuddies.org



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,579

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrsbradbury View Post

    ...Anyone else deal with these? What did you do?
    Yeah, mostly not with jumping, with Western pattern horse like Reiners, Western Riding and Trail horses with Alot (as in alot alot) of miles.

    Plus, of course, my Hunter that showed for 14 or 15 years or so, that one would get you in the show ring only, never put a foot wrong in the warm up or at home. She never stopped, she chucked me in a corner or on the closing courtesy circle a couple of times.

    They know nobody is going to touch them in the show ring...and they are sour/over it so wait until they are out there all alone in front of the judge to get back at you. And he did get away with it, twice. You getting on 5 minutes later after he gets led out of the ring is not the instantaneous correction needed, he won that battle.

    Seriously. It is premeditated. Only the smart ones figure out the difference between acting up in front of the judge where they usually get a free pass and out in the schooling ring or at home where they will pay for the behavior.

    Answer is obvious. Sacrifice a few classes, get a better rider on him and make him pay as he would anywhere else.

    Sounds like he has gone sour on you and needs a nice long break and a come back with a better rider. At least at first.

    I'd probably go ahead and get this kid something else while he gets a rest and rehabilitation program.

    Even packer saints have their limits. Ponies get sore hocks too, very few seem to do the injections like they do with the horses. If this one was just stepping up and having to rock back a little more? I would check that out. He may be sucking it up at home/ in the warm up like the trooper he has been plus knowing it's not allowed.

    I wouldn't turn him out on the freeway just yet.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



Similar Threads

  1. Having Problems Seeing Distances. Advice?
    By Horses and High Heels in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Dec. 24, 2011, 05:55 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: Dec. 7, 2011, 02:44 PM
  3. Replies: 19
    Last Post: Aug. 6, 2010, 12:24 PM
  4. Advice - Barn Problems
    By myALTERnative in forum Off Course
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: Aug. 12, 2009, 11:36 AM
  5. Barn Job Problems- advice?
    By Hear_my_echo in forum Off Course
    Replies: 77
    Last Post: Dec. 12, 2008, 11:02 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness