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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    SE Coastal NC
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    1,702

    Default Pipe rail fencing for paddocks

    As a native eastern NC'er, I have zero experience with pipe rail fencing and I didn't even know it existed until a few years ago! It's always been wood posts and electric fencing around here. However, I'm thinking of using either roundpen/livestock panels or pipe rail fencing for the runs off of my stalls. What do I need to know about this type of fencing? Any particular brands that you've used and like? Are there certain things to look for or stay away from? It all looks the same when I Google but I know looks can be deceiving!
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    5,785

    Default

    It very much depends on your horse...

    My TB enjoys trying to hurt himself, so we specifically did NOT want pipe he could stick legs through, as he enjoys naps along fences and sometimes rolls to put legs through fences if that's an option. Doof. When I was growing up we had pipe and QH-types, and no problems ever.

    Thicker pipe is more durable, and quality of welds matters. A well done weld results in a joint which is actually STRONGER than the material, but many (most I have seen) pipe corrals come apart at the joints due to poor welding jobs.

    Distance apart depends on animals in your area - do you need to keep out dogs or other livestock, or keep in goats or something smaller than horses?

    One thing to pay special attention to is the joints between panels. If there is a rounded gap, legs can get caught between the panels. There are pieces you can buy to fill that gap to prevent it, and if you're going to have horses out in pens with it, I highly recommend it.

    The best part of using panels is ease of reconfiguration when you need to change anything, make a smaller pen for a rehab, split horses up, whatever.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Location
    Alberta's bread basket
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    1,564

    Default

    These kind of fences are safer and rather strong.

    http://www.priefertfence.com/benefits.php
    http://www.mariposasporthorses.com/

    Practice! Patience! Persistence!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,269

    Default

    Rule #1 with pipe fence....leg vs pipe...pipe wins...leg breaks!! We moved to Oklahoma from NC (board fence, diamond mesh) we have "some" pipe fence here, but have removed the lower pipes and replaced with coated cable or electric. I can tell you of several nice horses that broke legs when they struck out, rolled or kicked through a pipe fence. It DOES NOT give!!! Mesh or electric would be much safer, especially in a run situation.
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    SE Coastal NC
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    1,702

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rodawn View Post
    These kind of fences are safer and rather strong.

    http://www.priefertfence.com/benefits.php
    Thanks! I was actually looking at those when I decided that I should post here to find out more info!

    I currently have two QH-types... one is 23 and the other is 9. Since it's just the two of them, it gives me a little more flexibility to make the runs larger on the side of the barn (less crowding). I do like the idea of being able to use the panels though and rearrange the runs if I find out they're not configured very well. I do have some concern about the solid piping though and leg injuries, in case someone should become a kicker, so thanks for bringing that up.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    4,917

    Default

    I have boarded at places with pipe run ins just about all of my life (California), including huge facilities, that house big name trainers and their pricy ponies - knock on wood I haven't seen a single serious injury due to pipe fencing (panel type)

    We did have one run into a fence in turn out - resulted in a HORRIBLE injury - it was a WOOD board fence - that broke and made a sharp point, opening the horse from chest to elbow.

    If using panels, you need to make sure that they come flush together at the top. There are some that have rounded tops, which make a little V which the horse can get a pastern stuck in if they get a hoof over the fence. Never seen it first hand, but have read horror stories.

    While pipe won’t break – it is smooth and solid – I have seen worse injuries with wood that DOES break, and makes sharp points to injure the horse on (and is put together with nails or screws which can become a hazard as well).

    Coated wire can do a real number on a horse's leg. I have seen one degloved on a coated wire fence (I would never use wire for a small paddock).

    Horses WILL find a way to injure themselves on just about anything. I feel that pipe is a safe choice, and is used extensively in CA.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2009
    Location
    Four Corners
    Posts
    820

    Default

    My corrals are pipe posts with pipe on top and a thick plastic covered wire for the lower parts. That's what came with the property and for the most part seems to be safe, though I worry about someone trying to jump it and get stuck though it's 5 feet high.

    I hate, hate, hate panels. My heart horse got injured on one when I didn't own her and had a leg swollen with lymphangitis for the 10 years following the accident. Another horse that I love, and want to be mine, just the other week somehow came down on the pin connecting the two panels and scraped one of his hind legs to the bone. We think he was kicking out at the horse he shares a pen with and got it above the pin (he's quite tall) there was hair and skin on one of the pins.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,049

    Default

    if the posts are set in concrete add a grounding rod with a bonded ground every 500 feet or at turns on the fence line or before comiong in contact with a structure.

    I have seen lightneing hit a pipe fence about 800 feet from where a mare was in a paddock who was about four feet from the fence, knocked her to the ground



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    39,970

    Default

    No matter what you use, some horse sometime managed to get hurt on that.

    The worst degloving injury I know of happened on a four board fence.
    Our neighbor's weaning colt tried to jump a pipe gate, flipped and broke his neck on impact.

    I think that, from all out there, I take pipe way before I use wood.
    I would never use bars for the top of stalls, because if a horse hits those grills hard enough, they can put a foot thru it, has happened before.

    Most horse pipe pens are made of pipe that bends if hit hard enough, it has some give.
    Better the panel bend than the horse, although too light a pipe will bend too easily and then become a hazard.

    Each one of us has to decide what we can live with and what is too much of a risk and it is ok if it is not the same for each one.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,845

    Default

    Pipe fencing (posts set in concrete, pipes welded together) is not the same as using corral panels.

    I lived in Arizona for 12 years, and nearly everything out there is pipe, even the stalls. ("Mare motels" they call them.) The only injury I can recall is from a horse getting a foot caught in the triangle formed by a diagonal cross-brace on a gate.

    I saw the BO's foal kick out with both back feet and get them *over* the top stall bar. He hung there for a bit and then slithered off the bar and back where he belonged. No damage done.

    This is large diameter, smooth steel pipe. (There are some fences out there made from sucker rod from oil drilling. That's narrow diameter and rough surfaced. If they get a leg over that it's going to take off skin.)

    Corral panels are not something I'd use long term. Unless you set posts and attach the panels to them, a horse can *lift* a panel, potentially detaching it from the other panels and getting loose. Unless you get the super heavy duty ones, they may also bend if a horse hits them hard. And you need to reinforce *every* connection or they can bump and wiggle the connectors just right to get them loose and then push the panels apart.
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    SE Coastal NC
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    Default

    I actually thought of the panels after seeing a photo on Pinterest It looked like they had wooden posts in the ground with the panels secured to the posts. Three panels on each side and then a single panel as a gate at the end of each run. This definitely would be the most ideal way of using the panels without worrying about a horse getting a hoof stuck somewhere it shouldn't be. However, that kind of defeats the purpose of using the panels so that they're easily moved and reconfigured! I'd probably be better off just using the rail fencing if I was just going to sink posts in the paddock area anyway. (Unless the panels are cheaper than the rails?)
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    787

    Default

    Where I board now there is pipe fencing in the paddocks off the stalls. The panels say medium weight and many of the panls are bent at the top with some of the top rails bent so much there are sharp edges! As some of the horses fight over the top of the panel, a strand of hot wire is added.

    My horse is not a fighter and his panels are all fine - I made sure before I moved him into his stall. We did have to add the hot wire when the horse next door started biting him constantly

    The other thing I have had to do is fill the little holes where the panels join the metal posts as yellow jackets were nesting inside the hollow pipe.

    They also have panels in the mare motel and I have not seen any bent panels there - different manufacturer. At a previous barn they use metal for the turn outs but had the turn outs made on site and welded rather than using panels - no paddocks were joined together so never an issue with fighting over a fence.

    So check the strength of the panels you purchase to make sure they do not bend easily as think that is a big hazard with sharp edges.



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