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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2011
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    134

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    Quote Originally Posted by vacation1 View Post
    I like looking at Petfinder, but it also makes my head hurt.

    1) I came across an ad for a older dog, maybe 10. Sweet face, I love old dogs, so I clicked on the photo for more details. And the dog had come into the shelter as an 8-week-old puppy.
    This is a big problem with no-kill shelters in areas where widespread "spay/neuter" hasn't caught on yet. The less-adoptable animals (usually large mixed-breed adult dogs that are shy, hyper, or whatever) gradually accumulate until there is little room to accept new dogs.

    We have such a shelter in my area, and they are now warehousing nearly 300 animals in a high-stress shelter environment.

    Many of the dogs they have on Petfinder have been there since puppyhood and are now 5 - 8 years old or older. Of course the unrealistic, "hoarder-ish" adoption criteria don't help either.

    It makes me crazy too.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
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    4,064

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sansena View Post
    Feel better now?


    I found my now 7yr old Ridgeback on Petfinder as a 6mo puppy. He was in MO but I had him transported to DC. Yep, transported a mutt across states

    The picture of him on petfinder I fell in love with
    http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a94...rent=Amani.jpg

    When he came to me (my son (RIP 2006) and Amani LOVED each other. They actually were sleeping like this
    http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a94...niJamiefeb.jpg

    The old man now that is such a good boy
    http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a94...AmaniDec18.jpg
    http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a94...aniDec18-1.jpg
    http://s9.photobucket.com/albums/a94...aniDec18-2.jpg

    ETA: Amani came from a no kill shelter and when I got him I thought he was going to die. He had kennel cough so bad when I got him off the plane it was horrible. I had no idea that he had it before he was sent to me. On a plus... he did come with meds
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
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    11,178

    Default

    I also don't understand some rescues asking $600 to adopt a dog and wonder how many actually do.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    1,755

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    I've noticed that anything black or black and white is usually called border collie cross.

    What ever happened to "mongrel", especially since clearly they are only guessing based on appearance?

    If they don't like "mongrel", say ' unknown' because surely that is most often true.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2007
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,870

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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    I also don't understand some rescues asking $600 to adopt a dog and wonder how many actually do.
    For one thing, I think a lot of rescues use it as a weeding process. If someone can't afford a $600 adoption fee, I doubt they'd be able to afford routine vet care, dog food, and any emergency care.

    For another, it covers the basic vet workup they receive. It's almost a given that a rescue will lose money on food and kennel board, but at least they can reduce that through volunteers and donations. Vet procedures are expensive and while some vets will give them discounts/free visits, you can't always count on it. Here's the fee breakdown my local rescue gives:
    http://www.phoenixanimalrescue.com/Costs.htm

    If you do the math on the lowest possible price ("cheap" male dog) for vet work and one night at the kennel it's already at $422. Add a few more nights or god forbid heartworm (avg $600 to treat) and you hit $500-600 easily.
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue



  6. #26
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    11,178

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    Well, there is no way I'd ever pay $600 for a dog, I think rescues claim they're weeding out poor people because they aren't really interested in adopting their dogs out. The local animal shelter adopts dogs out for $60.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    NM
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    1,517

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    You do realize that your local animal shelter is very likely subsidized by taxes.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2009
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    5,497

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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    Well, there is no way I'd ever pay $600 for a dog, I think rescues claim they're weeding out poor people because they aren't really interested in adopting their dogs out. The local animal shelter adopts dogs out for $60.
    One of my dogs adopted out for $75, the other for $85. I couldn't do a $600 adoption fee, but have NEVER had problems meeting vet payment obligations or buying (high quality) food.



  9. #29
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    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
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    18,005

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    The rescue I volunteer with has a sliding scale depending on the age of the dog. Puppies are usually $350 to $400, young dogs (under 2 years) 300 to 350, and so on. Seniors have a very nominal adoption fee. It's a breed rescue, so the dogs are in demand, they come fully vetted with all vaccinations, microchipped and neuter/spay.

    The young dogs subsidize the older dogs or the dogs that need extensive vet care. That's how rescue works. I very happily paid a $350 adoption fee for my Riley.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    Rising Sun, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    5,125

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    I volunteer at an SPCA and they had a wonderful sweet as can be Pit who had a pitiful, pathetic pic. She had been in for over a year and was just recently adopted... to look at the pic, most wouldn't give her a second look... but to meet her in person she was an awesome dog. Whomever adopter her got a great dog! A lot of the pics aren't great.
    http://www.leakycreek.com/
    http://leakycreek.wordpress.com/ Rainbows & Mourning Doves Blog
    John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
    Father, Husband, Friend, Firefighter- Cancer Sucks- Cure Melanoma



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2003
    Posts
    336

    Unhappy

    A rescue I know of that asks for a $500 + fee, has saved over 400 dogs over the past year out of very high kill shelters in the south. The vets up north say they never see such healthy and thoroughly vetted rescues as these dogs. They also guarantee happy placement and will take a dog back if there is any problem whatsoever. The dogs are fostered for a couple of weeks in the south while they are vetted and spay/neutered. If a physical problem becomes apparent while in foster, the dog is not returned to the shelter, but is treated, rehabbed and then placed. We are talking multiple hip surgeries and heartworm positive treatments. They are then transported with a reputable, safe and caring crew. This rescue looses money. These people kill themselves in this work out of love for the animals. And for each one they save, nine die. Every Monday morning a DUMPTRUCK full of 80 or so carcasses pulls out of the shelter here. Good gawd people. If you want to be upset about something, think puppymills and wars. Not Petfinder and the people who are doing the best they can to help with the horrific third world status of "animal welfare" in this country.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
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    3,815

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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    My beef with rescues is the groups that make it IMPOSSIBLE to adopt. My dogs are with me 99% of the time. They live on a horse farm. Of course they don't have a fenced in backyard! They have 95 acres of their own! I've had dogs for 31 of my 31 years...you'd think I'd know how to take care of a new critter
    Yep, this gets me too. I've had a number of dogs over the years, used to run a pet sitting service, used to be a vet tech, have great animal related references, etc...No dog has ever ever been lost, run away, given away or died of anything but euthanasia at an advance age due to badly deteriorating quality of life and natural disease processes. But, I do not have a fenced yard, so I'm persona non grata with many rescues.

    It would be near impossible to fence our yard, because it is a bizarre lot. More importantly, we don't NEED a fence because no dog ever goes outside without human supervision. We are outside a lot, we are active, they go to the barn with me, we have an awesome, 300+ acre conservation parcel just a couple of miles away that they can go off leash to...they don't need to be stuck out in a yard by themselves, so why would we fence? Most dogs are happier with their humans anyway...and happier inside the house when their humans need to leave and can't take the dog. I see (and more importantly HEAR) a lot of unhappy dogs in my neighborhood who are put outside alone in the yard for hours, when they'd rather be in the house.



  13. #33
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    1,436

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    Kachina wrote
    If you want to be upset about something, think puppymills and wars. Not Petfinder and the people who are doing the best they can to help with the horrific third world status of "animal welfare" in this country.
    This has always been my attitude, as well. If there are really bad rescues - meaning actually abusing and neglecting the animals in their care - then that is something to get upset about and of course they should have to face the same punishment as the rest of us would. I see so many people who have had a bad experience with ONE rescue (or breeder, for that matter) and then imply that they are all the same.
    Our city shelter is doing a great job at reducing euthanasia. They charge a very minimal fee, and frequently have specials with even lower adoption fees. They do have support from the city, AND they aren't able to provide the same level of veterinary care as some of the smaller rescue groups that do more intensive rehab and hence charge a higher fee. There are always inexpensive fees at county and city shelters. Rescues have to work together - not against each other - to help as many animals as possible. An individual finding a stray dog will often incur far more expenses than even the higher adoption fees out there. My neighbors found a dog 2 years ago and decided to keep her when they couldn't locate her owners. They said they spent $800 on her in the first week (they had her shots updated, had her spayed, had her groomed, treated her for some skin infections).



  14. #34
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    7,366

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    Casey, that is true -- but my strays are not something I choose, they foist themselves upon me. They can smell a softie from a mile away and gravitate to my house.

    Another that would never pay $600 for a dog. I adopt from kill shelters/the county humane society if I want a pet. Yes, of course they are subsidized and they need to be to get animals off the street. Honestly, some animals need to be put to sleep. The feral cats, dogs with problems etc. should be put to sleep so rescues can focus on animals that are more likely to be successful pets. Until we have successful national spay/neuter control, which likely will be never, I support kill shelters and what they do -- no matter how unsavory that truth is.

    My key is that I don't adopt based on looks, I pick the sweetest, most affectionate one even if it is homely. If they are sweet and affectionate in a shelter environment, they are pretty likely to be great pets anywhere.



  15. #35
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    fordtraktor - We all have different opinions and come with different experiences. I think that while animal control and shelters have a duty to protect the public from say, wandering packs of homeless dogs, I judge their efficiency and effectiveness on their euthanasia numbers. Yes, vicious dogs should be put to sleep. I am not at all certain that feral cats need to be put to sleep. Frankly, I think TNR is a better option. While euthanasia is necessary on some level, city shelters can be successful in drastically reducing euthanasia numbers. I believe in holding our city shelters accountable if rehoming the animals in their care is not a priority. I think that it is wonderful when people adopt a good adoption candidate from an open admission shelter - but I also support the rescue that takes a heartworm positive dog out of the shelter, treats the heartworm, and places the dog in a home. It's all part of the puzzle.



  16. #36
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    Oct. 22, 2009
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    2,851

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey09 View Post
    fordtraktor - We all have different opinions and come with different experiences. I think that while animal control and shelters have a duty to protect the public from say, wandering packs of homeless dogs, I judge their efficiency and effectiveness on their euthanasia numbers. Yes, vicious dogs should be put to sleep. I am not at all certain that feral cats need to be put to sleep. Frankly, I think TNR is a better option. While euthanasia is necessary on some level, city shelters can be successful in drastically reducing euthanasia numbers. I believe in holding our city shelters accountable if rehoming the animals in their care is not a priority. I think that it is wonderful when people adopt a good adoption candidate from an open admission shelter - but I also support the rescue that takes a heartworm positive dog out of the shelter, treats the heartworm, and places the dog in a home. It's all part of the puzzle.
    How can you possibly blame the shelter? Blame the people who don't spay and neuter, don't train their pets, don't make plans for their pets when they move, and dump their pets. There are only so many homes available for all those dumped cats and dogs. What exactly do you expect the shelters to do? They don't have the budget or workers/volunteers to feed/house/care for unlimited numbers, so they have no choice to euthanize.
    Quote Originally Posted by pinecone View Post
    I can't decide if I should saddle up the drama llama, dust off the clue bat, or get out my soapbox.



  17. #37
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    Big_Grey_Hunter: I don't necessarily blame the shelter - but I get tired of the blame game in general. Shelters often do need better facilities and more staff to keep the animals disease-free and to be open enough for people to come in and adopt. New management and policies can dramatically increase the total numbers of adoptions, and instead of fighting it, why not push to try it in our communities? As animal lovers, why not work on putting together options like low-cost spay and neuter and organize fundraisers? Complaining about bad pet owners doesn't help anyone. There will always be animals that need home and people who are bad pet owners.



  18. #38
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    Jul. 13, 2008
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    2,824

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kachina View Post
    Good gawd people. If you want to be upset about something, think puppymills and wars. Not Petfinder and the people who are doing the best they can to help with the horrific third world status of "animal welfare" in this country.
    I respect the emotion, but there is no cause on Earth too important or crucial to scrutinize. We can't assume that people in rescue work are doing the best they can. Human nature isn't angelic or saintly; apart from the bad cases of vicious abuse, there are many cases of well-meaning incompetence or burn-out. A shelter in NJ secretly rehomed a dog that had been brought in for euthanasia as an aggression case. The shelter employees simply didn't believe the owner, told her they'd euthanized him, and sent the dog to a new home. Where he killed a woman. Part of the horrific third-world status of animal welfare in the US is due to a lack of oversight and enforcement of existing laws.

    I appreciate rescue, and the people who work in it. But everyone in every industry faces criticism and oversight. I'm not suggesting they be attacked, just that there needs to be some standards of behavior, and frustrated that the most visible online gathering place for rescue animals is so blatantly unstructured and has ads that display the worst of rescue.



  19. #39
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    Jul. 20, 1999
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    CA
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    3,217

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey09 View Post
    I am not at all certain that feral cats need to be put to sleep. Frankly, I think TNR is a better option.
    For shelters that care for domestic animals and wildlife, how do you make the call that TNR on a cat is worth the cost of life to our song bird population?

    http://theoatmeal.com/comics/cats_actually_kill



  20. #40
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    Jul. 20, 1999
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    CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey09 View Post
    Big_Grey_Hunter: I don't necessarily blame the shelter - but I get tired of the blame game in general. Shelters often do need better facilities and more staff to keep the animals disease-free and to be open enough for people to come in and adopt. New management and policies can dramatically increase the total numbers of adoptions, and instead of fighting it, why not push to try it in our communities? As animal lovers, why not work on putting together options like low-cost spay and neuter and organize fundraisers? Complaining about bad pet owners doesn't help anyone. There will always be animals that need home and people who are bad pet owners.
    I'm confused about what you're saying. There are plenty of wonderful open admission shelters who take in all animals, have low cost s/n, foster programs, off site adoptions, low cost behavior programs, free behavior helplines, feral cat programs, don't blame the public (but work hard to educate on the importance of s/n), and they still have to euthanize due to too many animals and lack of homes. Sadly, there is no magic answer yet.

    I do agree there needs to be less blame game. On both sides. Can we start with getting rid of the no kill/kill/high kill terminology?

    ps - how many people know that the shelters who call themselves no kill can now euthanize 10% of their intake and still call themselves no kill?



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