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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Florida
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    294

    Default Lame at the trot, one way

    My mare limps slightly at the trot, only going one way.
    She's fine going the first way and at a walk and canter both ways.
    She has shoes and one pad on the front. Farrier seems to think it's in her shoulder, but last year when I had rads on her feet it showed a tiny amount of ringbone. Could that be it?
    I only pleasure ride on the flat, if that matters.
    My farrier recommended a message therapist, going along with the shoulder theory.
    I'm willing to try this and then of course on to vet and or chiro.
    What do you guys think?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
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    5,665

    Default

    Personally, I'd start with the vet and get a diagnosis before I did anything else.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Minnesota
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    Default

    You're just tossing darts at a board unless you get the vet out for a lameness workup. Start there.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Default

    Low ring bone in the foot can cause offness. A full workup would be a good place to start.



  5. #5
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    Dec. 5, 2005
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    Northern Virginia
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    Default

    Which leg which way? That can narrow it down to about a million possibilities (instead of 10 million!) . I'd get a vet out (one that deals with lameness otherwise you're wasting your money)--they will always start with the foot.
    Quote Originally Posted by EquineImagined View Post
    My subconscious is a wretched insufferable beotch.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2007
    Location
    Missouri
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    859

    Default

    Check on hard ground/pavement vs. soft ground. If good on hard ground, lame on soft, could be soft tissue injury. Many horses that have soft tissue injuries look lame only one direction.
    Please have a vet out. As you can see from the responses, it could be anything at this point.
    Some days the best thing about my job is that the chair spins.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
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    Default

    It could be so many things. Maybe ringbone maybe sore in her sole or many more issues. I'd have a vet out
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
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    13,345

    Default

    Unless you are pretty certain the lameness is a shoeing issue (close nail, etc), I would ALWAYS start with a vet first for lameness, then move on to whatever they may or may not recommend.

    Call the vet and do a lamenesss exam.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    CT
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    6,065

    Default

    Call your vet out for a lameness exam. A knowledgeable vet can tell a lot from jogging the horse on hard and soft ground, and on a circle. They can also do flexion tests and nerve blocks to pinpoint the exam spot of the lameness. Once you have a diagnosis, you and your vet can decide whether the horse needs rest, massage, or some other sort of treatment.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
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    4,055

    Default

    I have a horse that is occasionally lame at the trot only, sound at canter and walk, on a 20m circle only, and only to one direction. I had the vet out and its looking like its his shoulder. He gets the winter off anyhow so we're going to go through diagnostics in the spring.

    Do get the vet out and get a proper diagnosis, as was said, you're just throwing darts in the dark otherwise.
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.
    An adorable photography book, makes a perfect gift.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Florida
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    294

    Default

    I plan on having the vet out it's just so strange and intermittent.
    The farrier says she's not sore in the foot.So that threw me off. He is the one that suggested the shoulder.
    To buck22 your vet just said sore in the shoulder?
    Thanks for everyone's response.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2006
    Location
    PNW
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    388

    Default

    Good luck. I have a horse with the same symptoms and he's had 3 different diagnoses. i am currently treating him for a suspensory tear, but it didn't show up in the ultrasound. Unfortunately, he's a couple months into the rest and rehab program and he's still not sound at the trot ...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by anna's girl View Post
    I plan on having the vet out it's just so strange and intermittent.
    The farrier says she's not sore in the foot.So that threw me off. He is the one that suggested the shoulder.
    To buck22 your vet just said sore in the shoulder?
    No, the diagnosis for the moment is bicipital bursitis, or "swinging leg lameness". Not a muscle soreness, but a tendonitis that originates in the shoulder.

    Similar to a tendonitis I suffer from, my horse only hurts under certain circumstances... for him its trotting to the right on a small circle and very occasionally trotting in deep footing.

    I say 'diagnosis for the moment' as my vet and I have agreed to wait until spring for serious diagnostics, but my gut feeling is she's right on the money given the horse's history, the way it presents, and other issues, etc.

    While there are a few things we can try, the crux is to just cease doing whatever bothers him.
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.
    An adorable photography book, makes a perfect gift.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2006
    Location
    PA
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    my mare has ringbone and that's exactly how it started to show up for her.
    My mare wonders about all this fuss about birth control when she's only seen a handful of testicles in her entire life. Living with an intact male of my species, I feel differently! WAYSIDE



  15. #15
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    Nov. 9, 2005
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    uk
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    Quote Originally Posted by atr View Post
    Personally, I'd start with the vet and get a diagnosis before I did anything else.
    me to



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2001
    Location
    The Great White North, where we get taxed out the wazoo
    Posts
    638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DieBlaueReiterin View Post
    my mare has ringbone and that's exactly how it started to show up for her.
    A gelding I had also. I would get the vet, and hope they would be willing to do some blocking to help pin point exactly where. My experiences over the years has been a shoulder injury as initial diagnosis has about 100% ended up as a low ringbone or navicular type of thing.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2009
    Posts
    31

    Default

    As a equine massage therapist I also suggest you obtain a diagnosis before making any treatment plans if only to rule out serious injury. Continuing to ride her or exercise her with an injury could exacerbate the issue, increasing your future costs, and leaving your horse in more pain for longer.

    However, I generally notice that a horse who is weight-bearing lame (throws their head up or down) commonly has a joint issue, while a reduction in range of motion (shorter stride without pain reaction) occurs with muscle tension.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Florida
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    294

    Default

    Thanks for everyone's response. I do intend to get the vet out very soon, as of Sat and today, she's sound.
    The farrier is coming weds, she looks slightly uneven to me.



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