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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2010
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    Just FYI in case you did not know. The Succeed test does NOT tell you if a horse has hind gut ulcers. Basically it tells you that there is blood coming from that area. There are many reasons for it, not always hind gut ulcers. Can be as simple as worms or sand in the gut making the test positive for blood from that area.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

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    I went thru this with Beignet, spontaneous colitis. Oh what fun.

    Now... Here is what is interesting (to me). When we castrated him six months later, he bled. And bled. OMG, he bled. No clotting disorder. No surgical issue, so why? Turns out his protein was low. Really low. Gve him plasma and he stopped bleeding.

    So why the low protein? Not his diet. At some point, when we have recovered mentally LOL we need to start working on why the low protein and checking it. I will not be surprised if there is not some underlying issue. And this is the baby who had the * perfect * upbringing.

    Those of you with these odd issues, are you checking protein? Those of you who have, did your horse ever have low protein before?
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2001
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada, North America, Earth
    Posts
    1,080

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    My guy showed low protein and presented all other signs of colonic ulcers and was finally scoped and did not have gastric ulcers. I am going to run another CBC on him in another month or so and see if the proteins are back up.

    For anyone out there reading this and suspecting ulcers - take my advice and scope right away so you know what you're dealing with. I really wish I had scoped right away and could have avoided the painful summer my poor boy had as I could have started treating for colon issues sooner.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2010
    Posts
    1,486

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    I see what you are saying bucksnort but they are also finding that the fasting for scoping can cause gastric ulcers in some horses so that really complicates what is going on.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,485

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    Here's my 7 week update:

    I had to abandon the pelleted-only-feed route as I mentioned in my earlier post, though I kept up with the Succeed and Sucralfate.

    Then maybe 2 weeks ago I pulled my guy off of Sucralfate and moved him back to 2 grain feedings (1 sc 2x a day in addition to his hay). He was on the Sucralfate for a total of 6 weeks (ish), and my vet said to let him be done with it when I ran out of my last bottle.

    He is still on Succeed, probiotics (Equerry's Choice, I think, which has the YeaSacc in it), and apple cider vinegar (1 oz two times a day with his grain), and he's cleaning up his meals as well as he did while he was on omeprazole.

    I'll go back to what I've said before. In my guy's case (not trying to say this is the case for all or even many other horses), I think the root of the problem and the cause of the colic episodes was the omeprazole. That's out of his diet and he's back to his normal self.

    And I guess I feel like for him, despite testing positive for hind gut ulcers, the HGU were not the root issue. He *may* have had them, but I think if they were there they were a symptom of the omeprazole, not a systemic issue.

    Sorry to hear you're still in the midst of this bucksnort. I saw your PM and I feel for you. It was hard trying to keep my guy off of grass (particularly difficult on my farm since the only space without grass is a stall, and he's not a fan of being in the barn alone.....or of being in a stall at home in general). And the no hay thing didn't go over well either. I am relieved that in my case going back to hay and grass made such a positive difference. But again, in my case I think we identified the causative agent. I wouldn't have felt as comfortable doing that without that thought.

    Good luck to you and feel free to contact me by PM if you want to chat.
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,485

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    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    Those of you with these odd issues, are you checking protein? Those of you who have, did your horse ever have low protein before?
    EqTrainer - My guy had low protein when he was admitted to the vet clinic for both colics. I feel like we had to have done bloodwork before for other reasons and I don't recall his protein being low in those cases, but I could be remembering normal bloodwork from some of my other horses, so don't rely on my vague recollection of things I'll ask my vet to take a look at his records, though.
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2012
    Posts
    13

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    I'm still knee deep in 5x day feedings with my girl. Thank God for you COTHers, because my vet, though super nice, was clueless with what to do and none of her suggestions worked. My mare was gas colicky almost daily for two and half weeks before I read comments on this board that helped tremendously. Taking her off hay flakes 3x day and going to strictly hay pellets 5x day made a huge difference. I was already feeding her 2 cups of corn oil per day, so I just split it up into smaller doses with each feeding, plus adding psyllium and Succeed and a probiotic. I think adding a pre- and probiotic is beneficial. It's getting the good bacteria and microbes going again in their gut that helps them digest the long stem fiber.

    My mare still has some gas build-up, looks a bit bloated, but at least she's not dropping like a brick each day rolling in agony anymore. I did start turning her out in the pasture for a good bit of the day again, but with a grazing muzzle. Helps her sanity, and keeps her moving around helping the gas get out. She would hoover her meals and go nuts when the other horses were still munching hay. I even scattered some hay pellets around her stall to keep her busy.

    As others have mentioned, the 5x day thing is a timesuck and emotionally draining. I see a bit of light at the end of the tunnel, but we're not there yet.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
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    18,472

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    Quote Originally Posted by dressageaholic View Post
    I'm still knee deep in 5x day feedings with my girl. Thank God for you COTHers, because my vet, though super nice, was clueless with what to do and none of her suggestions worked. My mare was gas colicky almost daily for two and half weeks before I read comments on this board that helped tremendously. Taking her off hay flakes 3x day and going to strictly hay pellets 5x day made a huge difference. I was already feeding her 2 cups of corn oil per day, so I just split it up into smaller doses with each feeding, plus adding psyllium and Succeed and a probiotic. I think adding a pre- and probiotic is beneficial. It's getting the good bacteria and microbes going again in their gut that helps them digest the long stem fiber.

    My mare still has some gas build-up, looks a bit bloated, but at least she's not dropping like a brick each day rolling in agony anymore. I did start turning her out in the pasture for a good bit of the day again, but with a grazing muzzle. Helps her sanity, and keeps her moving around helping the gas get out. She would hoover her meals and go nuts when the other horses were still munching hay. I even scattered some hay pellets around her stall to keep her busy.

    As others have mentioned, the 5x day thing is a timesuck and emotionally draining. I see a bit of light at the end of the tunnel, but we're not there yet.
    Why cant she eat grass?
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2012
    Posts
    13

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    Our grass in Florida is super sugary most of the year, unless we have a freeze, so my other horses wear grazing muzzles all year round when they're out (they each get out either all day or all night). My mare with ulcerative colitis was fine wearing the grazing muzzle before she got colitis, but now she can't tolerate it and will try cribbing on the gate when it's on (but not when it's off). So I've had to keep her in her stall w/attached dirt paddock most of the day, with limited, supervised turnout.

    I'm scared to death of letting her have grass that is too sugary, super afraid it might set her back in her recovery. Some things I have read on RDC/ulcerative colitis suggest no grass for at least 30 days.

    Luckily winter is here and I think the sugar levels will lower and I think/hope/pray I will be able to let her out most of the day without a muzzle soon. Again, my sincere thanks for all the shared info about RDC on here. The three vets I talked to did not diagnose her correctly and she only got some relief after putting her on the RDC no long stem fiber diet. Her symptoms were right on the money for RDC.



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