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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2010
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    9

    Default What is this QH built to do? Conformation

    I adopted this horse about a year ago and want to know, by the conformation of this horse, what is he built to do? Reining, Cutting, halter, ect?

    I would really like to try reining but is he even built conformation wise to do so?

    http://i47.tinypic.com/2d94m6d.jpg

    I am new to the western world! HELP!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Plainview, MN
    Posts
    3,528

    Default

    http://www.equinews.com/article/rein...ation-analysis

    Your horse looks like a pretty average working type Quarter Horse. The type of horse that could do some reining, run games, or do some team penning/sorting. Doesn't look like a purpose bred halter horse or pleasure horse.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2011
    Posts
    1,192

    Default

    I think you need to look at his movement before determining that. Does he move from the shoulder or from the knees, how's his reach, etc.

    I like this video for details on what might work well for a discipline. He's also got a video as to more Western Pleasure type movement.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2010
    Location
    Idaho
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    9

    Default

    Thank you for that youtube video! That was great. I am going to look at him walk and move tomorrow! He looked very similar to that colt in the video!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2008
    Posts
    957

    Default

    That was such an interesting video....so overtracking is a good indication of a good stopper...never knew that but I know nothing about reining, cutting etc



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2011
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    1,192

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trafalgar View Post
    That was such an interesting video....so overtracking is a good indication of a good stopper...never knew that but I know nothing about reining, cutting etc
    Same here with not knowing much of those two professions, but how he describes it makes sense. The ability to get the back legs under the center of gravity would make a sliding stop easier for a reiner. It would also help with the catty reflexes a cutter would need to get the weight shifted back and lighten the front for the quick responses.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,795

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DanishWB View Post
    I would really like to try reining but is he even built conformation wise to do so?
    No. Doesn't mean you can't do reining on him! One thing that can be said about QHs is they have a lot of "try." They can outperform their conformation limitations because they want to please.

    He has some conformation issues that will limit his ability in the reining pen - high hocked, light in the gaskin, a fairly straight hind leg and a straight shoulder. He's also low in the back behind the withers. He might be standing on uneven ground in the photo. If he's not, he's really built downhill.

    Although his neck is a tad bit short, I like the way it ties into his chest and his legs look "sturdy" with good feet. This guy screams "roper" to me.
    Fan of the Swedish Chef



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2010
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    He's a bit downhill croup to withers (his forearm is a bit short). So he's made to sprint.
    Barrel racing, bulldogging, arena roping, anything that involves a sprint is what he's built to do. What his temperament is, will determine a big part of what he's good for.
    Nice bone, and looks like an easygoing fellow. "Reading" from his front feet, I'd bet that he loves his left lead, turns to the left, not so much going to the right.
    Yeah, the reining might be hard for him. It is absolutely possible for him to lift his front end and get his butt under him, (and done properly, such attempts to collect him will be very good for him) but it won't be easy for him like it would be for a horse that has an uphill build.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2011
    Location
    The Twin Tiers, NY & PA
    Posts
    136

    Default

    I agree with the poster that said speed might be his thing.

    But, mainly, I'm responding to say I love his smile!
    What's Horsie in the Twin Tiers? Find out here:
    http://thetwintiershorse.blogspot.com/

    Former user name: GilbertsCreeksideAcres



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2013
    Posts
    23

    Default

    i think he looks like he would do well in anything really but his knees look good for barrel racing and stuff like that or also reining could be an option



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Posts
    319

    Default

    I don't want to be mean about your horse, I'm sure he's a great guy. But realistically, he is fairly unbalanced. At least in the picture he looks downhill, short necked, low behind his withers, high-hocked and straight up and down in his shoulder. In general, none of these qualities are going to make him a great prospect for roping, barrel racing or reining as has been suggested. All of these take great physical effort and any downfall in their conformation can make their job harder for them and can cause unsoundnesses that are worse or more frequent than a horse built for their job.
    These disciplines and the training to make a horse require much more than just running real fast such as a sprinter. Even if you just want to try them or have fun with them, he will still have to go through the training process so he has a clue of what his job is. Otherwise it's no fun for you.
    Sometimes I read through people's responses on the Western forum and it's clear they are telling you stuff they may have heard somewhere or how they think it might be, when in reality they have no earthly idea or actual experience. I'm not a professional, nor do I play one on TV, but I do have actual experience, much of which I gained from "real" professionals. I've seen how bad conformation really does limit a horse. Your best bet would be to have him evaluated by a specialized trainer in the discipline you are interested in and go from there. Finding a "real" trainer (besides a BNT, which is always good) can be difficult if you aren't already in those circles.
    So I'm not wanting to be a *B*, and I know it's hard to know what to believe on-line. I also realize this horse could do, or even already been doing, one of these jobs. It certainly isn't impossible. It's just that from this pic, it's unlikely. But whatever, if he's a good guy and you like him and aren't set on actually competing and winning in these, who cares?! Enjoy him! (I hope i didn't make you mad, wasn't my intention) :-)


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2007
    Posts
    830

    Default

    Not a western person here...but I wanted to chime in.

    He is a nice looking guy. He is a bit downhill right now, but I think with some good basic Dressage work, his back would come up, and he would have an easier time overall with whatever job he goes on to do.

    He's built a lot like my Quarab was when I first purchased him...dropped back, high croup, little muscle tone in the neck. Now, I have a lovely horse that is training in 2nd level movements...the freedom in his shoulders tops any of the warmbloods in the barn...and he is the most sane horse out of the bunch as well!

    I love his smile He looks like he would be a horse that is wanting to please. He needs some basic fitness to get him going.

    *don't flame me, I know that confirmation makes a huge difference for the specific disciplines, it's just what I noticed first about this lovely guy.
    Unashamed Member of the Dressage Arab Clique
    CRAYOLA POSSE= Thistle



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,142

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cookie-monster View Post
    I don't want to be mean about your horse, I'm sure he's a great guy. But realistically, he is fairly unbalanced. At least in the picture he looks downhill, short necked, low behind his withers, high-hocked and straight up and down in his shoulder. In general, none of these qualities are going to make him a great prospect for roping, barrel racing or reining as has been suggested. All of these take great physical effort and any downfall in their conformation can make their job harder for them and can cause unsoundnesses that are worse or more frequent than a horse built for their job.
    These disciplines and the training to make a horse require much more than just running real fast such as a sprinter. Even if you just want to try them or have fun with them, he will still have to go through the training process so he has a clue of what his job is. Otherwise it's no fun for you.
    Sometimes I read through people's responses on the Western forum and it's clear they are telling you stuff they may have heard somewhere or how they think it might be, when in reality they have no earthly idea or actual experience. I'm not a professional, nor do I play one on TV, but I do have actual experience, much of which I gained from "real" professionals. I've seen how bad conformation really does limit a horse. Your best bet would be to have him evaluated by a specialized trainer in the discipline you are interested in and go from there. Finding a "real" trainer (besides a BNT, which is always good) can be difficult if you aren't already in those circles.
    So I'm not wanting to be a *B*, and I know it's hard to know what to believe on-line. I also realize this horse could do, or even already been doing, one of these jobs. It certainly isn't impossible. It's just that from this pic, it's unlikely. But whatever, if he's a good guy and you like him and aren't set on actually competing and winning in these, who cares?! Enjoy him! (I hope i didn't make you mad, wasn't my intention) :-)
    I appreciate this response so much. I couldn't agree more. The last thing the OP would want to do is hurt this horse or sour his attitude. I too, do not see reining in his future. If you've seen the picture going around Facebook that compares horse anatomy to human anatomy, you'll see that his hocks are the equivalent of your knees- so his 'knees' on the backend are going to have to squat, hold, and then lift, his heavy, downhill front-end. That is going to sore his loins and lower back, fast.

    I do not doubt he's a cool horse and a fun horse- but he's not built to be comfortable or successful as a reiner. Just do please ensure you fit him up slowly, and very carefully, whatever you decide.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2012
    Posts
    189

    Default

    I haven't seen the video Katarine mentions, but the horse's hocks are equivalent to a person's heel anatomically speaking. Stifle is the equivalent of human knees.

    Conditioning is a wonderful thing.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
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    Default

    You're right, I mis-typed. Either way, she could wear this horse out asking him to do stuff that will be VERY hard for him to do.



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