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  1. #61
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    Apr. 12, 2002
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    Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarbaricYawp View Post
    Ditto. I had a stalker when I was in my 20s and lived in Baltimore. I literally didn't know who this guy was or why he chose me, but he would 'stop by' while I was washing my car, knock on my front door at 7 AM on a Sunday to see if I wanted to 'go to breakfast' and drive past my house repeatedly. I found footprints all around my back door on more that one occasion. Oh, and I lived literally 200 feet from a police station. I'm not a nervous person, but the whole thing was making me extremely jumpy. The saving grace was that this guy was terrified of my German Shepherd, otherwise I'm confident I would have come home one night from work to find him in the house. My little sister stayed with me for a week and he tried to follow her in one afternoon, but got confused and left when he realized it wasn't me. This guy was seriously scary, I had NO idea of who is was or where he lived and it took WEEKS of my neighbors helping me out before we were finally able to get a licence plate number (usually he showed up on foot). I documented all the sightings and as soon as we got that number, marched out the back door directly to the police station. The desk officer told me I was lucky in that Maryland had JUST passed a stalking law. They pulled the guy in, I had to go to court with an attorney. The judge ordered a psych evaluation on the guy, who promptly lost it in court. Cops had to put a plainclothes officer in front of my house for 3 days. Moral of the story: Not everyone who can hold a conversation is rational or stable, even without the addition of mind-altering substances.

    To answer the original question: We're very rural, but since we've had a rash of break-ins over the past few months and since we also have client horses on our property, if I see an unknown and unexpected vehicle at the barn the first thing I'm doing is locking it in by locking the gates. The second thing is calling 911 and the third thing is going to my house and getting my dog and a rifle. If they left me a phone number I'd make calling that item #4, but they wouldn't be leaving the property until the police came and ran the licence plate. I don't care if the police are bothered by the dog and the rifle -- both are registered -- but at my age and gender I'm not going to take any chances.

    Wasn't that the worst? Pre-stalking laws, I had a stalker who would follow me and call my house, ask for me by name, then proceed with his obscene phone call. It got to a point where he would wait, parked behind my car at the grocery store, and follow me. Every single time I was naked and about to get in the shower, the phone would ring and it would be him.
    Not long out of highschool, I worked in a video store. This guy was the father of a guy I casually knew from working there. He would come in and rent tons of porn. He even bought a car nearly identical to what I drove, which was not something that could happen by coincidence since I drove a little 2 seater, rear engine sports car that my father had searched high and low for, for my birthday.

    One day, the guy was behind my car at the grocery store. I left and ran a red light to try and get away from him and he ran the light behind me. I went to the nearest place I could think of, my friend's house. I slid in the driveway and bolted from the car screaming "It's him". Her father ran out the door and grabbed me on the way to his truck, where we chased the guy down and her father told the guy how it was going to be or what he was going to do to him.

    I never saw the guy again until about 3 years later when I was at a friend's home and walked around the corner, right into the guy. He was their gardner.

    We were also robbed when I was in high school. We had a farm way out in the country, there were cars in the drive, and the thieves cut the phone lines. I also had 3 Siberian Huskies at the time, one who was not friendly. The police said it was someone who knew us and they felt the thieves had a key to our house.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  2. #62
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    Jul. 5, 2007
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    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
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    A friend of mine was stalked by her next door neighbor. He sent her notes with cut out words just like the ones in the movie The Bodyguard. Veeeerrrrrryyyyy creepy.



  3. #63
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    Apr. 14, 2006
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    I don't think the OP is the least paranoid or over reacting!!! We live at the end of a dead end dirt road...I can see night lights of three neighbors, but not one house and no one has to come down our road to get to their homes. We leave the doors unlocked and the keys in the vehicles, but if I saw a strange car in the yard, a weird note on the windshield and three people in my pasture, you can bet I'd call 911, get my gun, big bad dog on a leash and wait to see what happened next. In this day and age of druggies and weirdos, cautious people will probably live longer!!! I believe the "good guys" have to prove themselves...all others are suspect. Way too many "good samaritans" are getting killed...in our part of the country, anyway!! I would be VERY upset with the response...or lack of...by the sheriff and would report it to someone!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  4. #64
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    It's kind of hard to compare Sonoma County, CA with...well, anywhere in TX.

    Having a PPW in TX is common. Being nowhere near anything is also common. TX is an ENORMOUS state and has a lot of low population areas. And when you get to the "out there" areas...the PD can be good and it can be impossible. The few officers in areas like this don't have a lot of supervision and a few areas can get, well, lazy. (not just TX, similar other areas also)

    I'm in CT. Nowhere near a huge state, and a very populated one. A little "overly-civilized" lol! My town doesn't have a PD. We have an RT. (resident trooper) My neighbors are close compared to larger areas but not visible. I'm on a rear lot in the middle of a state forest.

    If someone comes onto my property uninvited, I will arm myself before walking out to meet them. Concealed, as a just in case. The dogs come with me. Better safe than sorry. I've never needed and have made more friends than anything else. (it's usually someone lost) But I'm also very outgoing. And all my neighbors are friends.

    And most of the worst crimes we hear about on the news have people all saying, "Nothing like that ever happens here! It's small town/safe!" So no need to Rambo, but there is a need to keep oneself safe. Prevention helps a lot too. Motion detectors scattered around the property are a big help. I know if someone comes up the driveway or through much of the woods or into the barn area. But with neighbors like that, RTR, I'd see if there's *any* feasible way to move. For your own peace of mind. And while that sucks...sometimes it's better than the alternative...*if* it's possible.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  5. #65
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    Apr. 12, 2002
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    Texas
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    No moving. I bought my farm before they moved in and I tried to buy the house where they live now, but the owner's wanted a ridiculous amount for a house that had been sitting, abandoned for years. I have actually wondered all along if the people living there now are squatters. The owners live out of town and never visit the house, so they would never know. The people living there showed up after hurricane Ivan with stuff crammed into the bed of 2 pickups. They didn't unpack for over 2 weeks and it was around 2 months before they had power turned on to the house.

    It's a great neighborhood, except for that one residence, all the neighbors say so. We just keep hoping they will either be arrested and sent away or get tired of the police checking them out consistently and move.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  6. #66
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    Oct. 27, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbm View Post
    wow, you folks must live in some really scary neighborhoods!

    i would of called the number and talked to the folks.... and *then* decided what to do.

    dont you think if they meant you harm they would not of parked in your driveway and left you a note?

    <shakes head>
    I don't think it necessarily has anything to do with the neighborhood. I live in a rural but seemingly safe area. We have one of the highest per capita income levels in the county, it's mostly populated with techies who want to play farmer. It's a community of families who don't want for much and who are generally kind and trustworthy. There were some kids who committed a few barn burglaries about 7 years ago but other than that no significant crime that I can recall in the 15 years my family has owned the property. At the same time, it is rural. Our neighbors look out for each other, but the properties are large and there are woods between my neighbors and our house so none of them would be in sight or easy hearing distance if something was to happen. I feel safer when my large, MMA fighting SO is home but you better believe I would have reacted in the same way as OP if I had come home to the same scene and I was alone. She also mentioned that she was with her mentally challenged brother, giving her additional reason to be protective and on guard. The whole story sounds super sketchy, the people sounded extremely weird/creepy. IMO her wariness was absolutely justified.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #67
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    Sep. 8, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    So in your world, a person who normally legally carries is causing people to escalate?


    I have to say, the condition of the car does matter.
    Though the comment that you can not assume what anyone is going to do is accurate, it is probably safer to assume (eek that word) that the guy wearing the 3 piece suit driving a nice car and leaves a coherent note on your door is less likely to be a problem than three hippy types whose note makes no sense even after it is explained.
    And to add to this comment -- not sure how the rest of the country handles this, but in our neck of the woods, people CALL before they drive over to a neighbors farm and strangers/vendors pull up to the FRONT DOOR and honk and wait for someone to come out. This is considered polite for any number of reasons -- you might be sunbathing nude, you might have your hands full with a dangerous/uninterruptable task like getting a mare bred, you might be sick with ebola or you simply may not want visitors. If no-one answers, you come back later, not take it as licence to stroll around. Simply letting yourself onto someones property to look for something is not only trespassing, it's potentially dangerous (how do you know that I don't have a mean stallion/bull/dog that might try to take you apart?). So many things about RTRs trespassers don't make sense. I think they were looking for portable items of value. Sadly I think the roos were in the trunk. I also think they spent the time with RTR to basically try to talk their way back off the property. And I think RTR did the right thing by calling the police, even if they fell down on the job. I absolutely think that carrying a gun and having a large dog on a leash is menacing -- it's intended to be so. The message is that the interlopers have caused you alarm, enough alarm that you are prepared to defend yourself. Most 'normal' people would apologize profusely, not provide garbled overlays to what was already a garbled story.



  8. #68
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Lorena, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    Having a PPW in TX is common. Being nowhere near anything is also common. TX is an ENORMOUS state and has a lot of low population areas. And when you get to the "out there" areas...the PD can be good and it can be impossible. The few officers in areas like this don't have a lot of supervision and a few areas can get, well, lazy. (not just TX, similar other areas also)
    Some of the more rural counties in Texas also don't have law enforcement officers on duty 24/7. I recently found that out. *sigh*

    So there are times you can call the SO and get no one/no help.
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  9. #69
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    Apr. 12, 2002
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    Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirljenn View Post
    Some of the more rural counties in Texas also don't have law enforcement officers on duty 24/7. I recently found that out. *sigh*

    So there are times you can call the SO and get no one/no help.
    So true!

    My friend who is a city police officer actually lives in the next county over. She told me this morning that in that county, she knows she would be on her own if anything were to happen at her house, so she doesn't even bother to call if anything goes on. Of course she is an LEO, so she is equipped to handle things better than most people.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  10. #70
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Yup, apparently the rules of survival are different in the Republic of Texas than the other 49 states.

    It's all good if you want to pack and trust your ability to know when to pull the trigger. But that means that you must concede the same right to others. Yet these are the people you don't trust to respect basic stuff like trespassing laws or how to leave a note that's not threatening.

    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    So in your world, a person who normally legally carries is causing people to escalate?


    I have to say, the condition of the car does matter.
    Though the comment that you can not assume what anyone is going to do is accurate, it is probably safer to assume (eek that word) that the guy wearing the 3 piece suit driving a nice car and leaves a coherent note on your door is less likely to be a problem than three hippy types whose note makes no sense even after it is explained.

    Well, we never decided what qualified the pro-gun/defend my castle types to carry. If you want to assume that these people are within the law and exquisite negotiators or judges of character so that they don't cause gratuitous carnage, then OK. But it is an assumption.

    And check these pictures of my beloved old truck. http://s800.photobucket.com/albums/y...%20It/?src=wap

    If you looked at this truck, would you think it was owned by a single woman with a buttload of education, a job, a 720 credit rating and, in short, too much to loose to be risking going to jail or being shot?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  11. #71
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    Jul. 21, 2006
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    South Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarbaricYawp View Post
    And to add to this comment -- not sure how the rest of the country handles this, but in our neck of the woods . . . strangers/vendors pull up to the FRONT DOOR and honk and wait for someone to come out. . . .
    Simply letting yourself onto someones property to look for something is not only trespassing, it's potentially dangerous. . . Most 'normal' people would apologize profusely, not provide garbled overlays to what was already a garbled story.
    That's how we do it where I live. It's because nearly everybody has a pack of free-range canines, so you pull up in the yard and honk the horn and wait for the person to put up the dawgs before you get out of the car. If you intend to leave with all the same appendages you arrived with, anyway.

    I agree the note was bullshite, and the explanation was more of the same. Uh, I lost my horse and my bluetooth in your back pasture, which is enclosed by not just one but two fences? Right. I'm sorry about your arm, Mr. Bundy, but no, I really can't help you get your stuff loaded on top of your car. The one you took the seats and the interior door handle out of.



  12. #72
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    Sep. 8, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    Yup, apparently the rules of survival are different in the Republic of Texas than the other 49 states.

    It's all good if you want to pack and trust your ability to know when to pull the trigger. But that means that you must concede the same right to others. Yet these are the people you don't trust to respect basic stuff like trespassing laws or how to leave a note that's not threatening.




    Well, we never decided what qualified the pro-gun/defend my castle types to carry. If you want to assume that these people are within the law and exquisite negotiators or judges of character so that they don't cause gratuitous carnage, then OK. But it is an assumption.

    And check these pictures of my beloved old truck. http://s800.photobucket.com/albums/y...%20It/?src=wap

    If you looked at this truck, would you think it was owned by a single woman with a buttload of education, a job, a 720 credit rating and, in short, too much to loose to be risking going to jail or being shot?
    I've seen worse. Heck, I've *driven* worse. LOL

    I don't live in Texas, but personally I don't think judging people by their clothing/vehicle is the right approach. If it was I'm sure that one of my redneck neighbors would have long-since taken me out as I passed by in 'work mode' (business attire and a hybrid vehicle), masquerading as a tree-hugging liberal.

    But why are you assuming that carrying/displaying a gun requires you to use it? If you are well-educated you know there are plenty of folks out there for whom polite conversation simply isn't going to get the point across -- you are going to have to give them a reason to respect you and they sure as heck don't respect your IQ or credit score.



  13. #73
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    Apr. 12, 2002
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    Texas
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    I think it's funny that this thread turned into a "Texans are gunslingers thread" when I think the only Texan talking about guns is Bluey and well, she's Bluey..lol.

    I judged them because it looked like they lived in the vehicle and yet they were saying they owned a horse, and were looking for it on my land (or so it seemed from the note). How does someone living in a car keep a horse? It just didn't add up.

    Yes, I would have been just as mad if they were driving a Range Rover that didn't look like someone lived in it, but I would have been less skeptical about them having a horse. People can say "don't judge by appearances" all day long, but at the end of the day, all of us do it in some way. People judge me all the time by my appearance, and once they knew me, they've told me so and told me how wrong they were. Apparently I give off the conceited bitch who thinks she's hot stuff vibe, but once people get to know me they say that I'm really nice and would do anything to help anyone.
    Last edited by RacetrackReject; Sep. 26, 2012 at 03:58 PM.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :


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  14. #74
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    Mar. 14, 2010
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    Earlysville, Virginia
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    Sheesh. RTR you were right to use all of your senses to figure out a way to defend your property. Sketchy note that begins with "I mean you no harm?" I would have been skeptical. Trespassing on your property? More sketchy. Beat up car looking like someone was living in it? Also weird.

    My truck is in good shape but sure is messy, and I still would have been weirder out. You use past experiences to decide how you're going to act in a situation. In my experience, I have less to worry about when someone drives a nice, clean, well taken care of vehicle than if they appear to be living out of it.

    Personally, I would have gone to the house, grabbed my registered gun, and called the number on the note. Depending on my gut, I would have called the cops. If they're willing to break the law by trespassing, that's one strike against them in my mind, and I will do whatever necessary to defend my land, horses and family.

    For goodness sake, you had to protect your brother as well. Calling the cops was the right choice.

    Any sign of your Roos?
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  15. #75

    Angry

    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Ted Bundy anyone? Reputedly he was quite charming.

    I think you have to have run into this sort of people before to develop the attitude - but once upon a time I had a very pleasant conversation with a guy who was passing me a bad check. Really nice guy, just happened to be stealing from me at the time.

    The most polite people are con artists.



  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    I find it mind-boggling that people react this way, with thoughts of violence and automatically calling police.
    The people in question weren't exactly sneaking around.
    The people in question did not act in a threatening manner.
    The people in question were trespassing, yes, and were clearly idiots, but they DID leave a nice note trying to explain why they were there.

    If they weren't looking for some lost item, what do you think they were out there doing?

    So if we accept that you can actually tell by looking at a car whether someone is down on their luck (I doubt this very much, some well-off folks keep their cars in quite a mess), isn't it possible that someone paid them to go look for the lost item? why else would they be there?

    what about this scenario warrants calling the cops, and getting guns, and talking about shooting intruders? nothing.
    Have you had your IQ tested lately? And/or do you read/watch the news, or just comic books &/or horsey stuff? GOOD GRIEF woman. I really really fear for you out in the world of unicorns & rainbows you must live in.

    Oh, & as for the original incident - the OP is a better man than I am. I would have shown the rooster feathers as "probably cause" & INSISTED that the sheriff pop the trunk. If he declined, I would have made a major stink at headquarters.



  17. #77
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    Jul. 30, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trakehner View Post
    Child molestors have their stories...."I've lost my puppy can you help me find him?" etc. They don't all look evil (as someone said, Ted Bundy would have his arm in a sling looking pathetic.)

    Tresspassers deserve to manners or understanding. Criminals depend on the lack of awareness in their victims. It's why criminals ask, "What time is it?" Their victim looks down at their watch and is hit while his eyes are off the bad guy.

    Bad guys are bad guys. Protecting your life is worth having a gun and being willing to fight the goblins who want to hurt you. Remember the Coth person killed and her house set on fire several months ago....bad things happen everywhere.

    I was with a friend once who hit a car when parking. He had hit the door and left a note that said, "People are watching so I'm leaving a note...screw you". He laughed about it...I told the people he hit the tag number of the car (as a helpful annonymous citizen)...notes mean nothing.
    Off topic, but which COTHer was killed?
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  18. #78
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Well, we never decided what qualified the pro-gun/defend my castle types to carry. If you want to assume that these people are within the law and exquisite negotiators or judges of character so that they don't cause gratuitous carnage, then OK. But it is an assumption
    One of the fantastic benefits of living in this country is that it isn't up to the general public's opinion on who can be licensed to carry, own or use a firearm.

    However I am someone who has been one of those who gets to choose who carries in my state or not. I can't speak for other states, but here all of the firearms instructors I know are more than qualified to be making those decisions.

    I do understand that people not familiar/experienced with firearms tend to find them scary since the news is filled with stories of morons with firearms doing moronic things. (many of those firearms being illegal anyway)

    But I can assure you that most people who carry are people you'd never expect of having a firearm. Including soccer moms, church officials, grandmas and grandpas, etc.

    A firearm is about 100 times less likely to kill someone than a car is. And yet...we license almost everyone for that. I don't disparage car owners because so many people are killed in MVAs annually.

    If you looked at this truck, would you think it was owned by a single woman with a buttload of education, a job, a 720 credit rating and, in short, too much to loose to be risking going to jail or being shot?

    Well....erm.....uh....
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  19. #79
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    Jul. 31, 2012
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    SE VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belg View Post
    Lock, load, and call 9-1-1. "Bluetooth devices" don't walk into a freakin pasture.
    This.



  20. #80
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Kookicat-it was the woman who was a photographer, and her ex is the alleged perp in this case. I never read a followup that changed any of the information in the original story so if any is incorrect then someone please correct me. I believe she was found because the house was set on fire and she was found by rescuers. She sounded like a wonderful person from her friends talking about her on here and in the Chron article.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



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