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  1. #21
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    RTR-I would have been ticked also. Especially since the deputy seemed to think it wasn't a problem, and didn't want to do a report. I think I'd have a little talk with the Sheriff about certain people and their attitudes.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  2. #22
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    Apr. 12, 2002
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    Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by RainyDayRide View Post
    That was my question also.

    and I'm a bit confused - in your OP, you said that you had called the police and the dispatcher told you one was on the way. What happened to that one? and, if police=sheriff, why wasn't one already on the way when you spoke to Mitchell?

    (I don't blame you for being upset ... sounds as if the deputy blew you off.)
    I don't really know what happened to the original officer that was supposedly sent when I called dispatch, or if he just took his time getting to my house until the sheriff called and made the 2nd request.

    I live outside of the city in a rural area, so my area is serviced by the Sheriff and the county police, instead of city police.

    Mitchell, the Sheriff, knows me and probably thinks I'm a big pain in the arse because I stayed on his behind about a horse that needed to be euthed. I posted about it in the Horse Care forum at the time it was going on, with pictures. The horse was missing one hoof completely and that leg was the size of an elephant's leg practically. Upon closer inspection, with Mitchell, the other hooves of the horse were breaking down as well. He told me that the horse was fat and obviously being fed, so he didn't know what he could to. I told him that there were a lot of ways to abuse a horse that didn't involve starvation. In the end, he gave in, and the horse was humanely euthanized, but not before commenting to me about "that damn girl is busting my balls all over the internet about this horse". He now knows that girl was me.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  3. #23
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Eek, I do not blame you for being livid.

    Did you mention the missing roosters to the deputy?



  4. #24
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    Apr. 12, 2002
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    Texas
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    I did not. I was kind of overwhelmed and I thought maybe the roos were just hiding somewhere because they didn't know these people and weren't used to cars driving up to that area. It wasn't a huge area of feathers, but upon closer inspection, after they had left and moved the car, I can tell that the feathers were ripped out in small clumps. I looked all over for the roos, in the dark, but I never found them or any other signs of them. I looked again this morning, but nothing.

    Now that I think about it, the man asked if I had any Polish chickens, and one of the missing roos was part Polish and had a head poof with feathers down his legs. I wonder if that's why he asked.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  5. #25
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    You should now call Mr. Police office back and add to the report the piles of feathers where the car was and the missing roosters.

    Clearly they will do nothing to the idiots but worth having it written down.



  6. #26
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    Apr. 12, 2002
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    Texas
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    I have a good friend in the city police department and I think I am going to contact her about this. I know she will give me an honest read on what was the officer's responsibility once he was on the scene and if I should call back and report the roos missing. Thanks.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2000
    Location
    Concord, NH
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    In addition to what the other have said about calling 911, being armed, staying in the house etc I would have made sure their car could not leave prior to LE arriving - whether you parked your vehicle in front of theirs (possibly hazardous to your truck) or took their distributor cap or let the air out of their tires.

    You want them gone, but at this point, it's your timetable. It also sends the message that you don't mess around with people on your property. Sometimes it's ok if the rest of the world thinks you're batsh*t crazy.


    I am fortunate in that I live in a large enough place that if I call 911 with that sort of situation they are likely to arrive in less than 10 minutes but if they had left? Even if you got their plate you might not find out who they are.



  8. #28
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    I'd be calling the neighbors for reinforcement and the sheriff. In that order.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  9. #29
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    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I'd be calling the neighbors for reinforcement and the sheriff. In that order.
    This. What an ugly deal, RTR



  10. #30
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Well, RTR, since you know PO organizations from the inside, then you knew, too, that you already had the PITA reputation from them.

    LEOs should be even-handed and professional at all times to everyone. But then you can't, in the next breath, start out-buddying the intruders by talking about who is better friends than whom with Sheriff Guy, Mitchell.

    Yeah, they should have popped the trunk since your roosters were missing. No, it would be uncool for your reputation to call them back about that now. No, the kid with the snotty face and hand is irrelevant. Yes, the condition of the perps' car is, too.

    Just wondering: How come you didn't call the celly first and firmly ask the intruders to come back from your pasture and explain WTF? If they get huffy, you can dial 911 then.

    You gun slinger/castle defender types: Since you have weapons that give you the distinct possibility of ramping things up all the way to someone dying and perhaps you going to jail, how come you guys aren't connoisseurs of reasonable escalation and the art of de-escalation?

    I don't mean to criticize. It's a serious question. My dad, the gun dude in our family, was gung-ho about using a gun only as the very, very last resort. Are others not so serious? What did I miss?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Use of the gun is the very last resort, but generally bad guys don't sit around and wait while you go off to the house to get the thing out of the gun safe - oh, you escaped from jail and you're stealing my car and want me to climb in it with you, no thanks, excuse me while I go get my pistol? Not so much.
    So it's carried in an easily accessible fashion. It isn't too hard to get a concealed carry permit here in KY, or better yet just have it visible but inconspicious.
    When it takes the law up to an hour to get some places you need to have some other alternatives. I would expect my neighbor, if I called him, to show up with a firearm able to be used if absolutely necessary, but I sure wouldn't be bothering him about the Jehovah's Witnesses either!
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  12. #32
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    Apr. 14, 2006
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    GAD!! I'm not impressed with the law enforcement in Texas, judging from this account!! We are planning to relocate to NE Texas - 75 miles from Dallas. The sherriff's casual response to your call would have me worried!! As a tax payer I would expect a faster, more thorough investigation to a 911 call...even if they do consider you to be a nuisance over past issues. I thought Texas was a tougher, more lawful place. Guess we better clean our guns and fatten up our watch dogs!! I would have been very upset with your whole situation and royally PO'd to be missing my birds!! Do the intruders live near you?? Damn if I wouldn't go insist on seeing their trunk!!! ...or at least their yard!! Or file another complaint!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Use of the gun is the very last resort, but generally bad guys don't sit around and wait while you go off to the house to get the thing out of the gun safe - oh, you escaped from jail and you're stealing my car and want me to climb in it with you, no thanks, excuse me while I go get my pistol? Not so much.
    So it's carried in an easily accessible fashion. It isn't too hard to get a concealed carry permit here in KY, or better yet just have it visible but inconspicious.
    When it takes the law up to an hour to get some places you need to have some other alternatives. I would expect my neighbor, if I called him, to show up with a firearm able to be used if absolutely necessary, but I sure wouldn't be bothering him about the Jehovah's Witnesses either!
    OK, but the bad guy in this case left his car, a note with a purpose and a cell phone number in the OP's driveway. Doesn't strike me as the next serial killer, yanno?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Creepy. Their attitude of entitlement is disturbing and scary.



  15. #35
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    OK, but the bad guy in this case left his car, a note with a purpose and a cell phone number in the OP's driveway. Doesn't strike me as the next serial killer, yanno?
    Our closest neighbor is our sheriff and he tells everyone never to assume who or what someone is.
    No one can tell who is up to no good just by talking to someone, it is not like in the movies.

    He, after years in the business of figuring who is a criminal, still can't always be sure.
    Why would we, that never come across the criminal element, think we can tell any better than he can?

    Be proactive and that means to call them when something is not right.
    We can always call back and say all is ok, if it is and they will call the troops off.



  16. #36
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    Jun. 21, 2004
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    Cairo, Georgia
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    just be sure that when you call the police in TX that your dogs don't end up getting shot. Sorry to interject that but TX is the #1 state for pets being shot by cops.
    Producing horses with gentle minds & brilliant movement!
    www.whitfieldfarm.shutterfly.com



  17. #37
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    May. 21, 2008
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    Sonoma County, California
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    You gun slinger/castle defender types: Since you have weapons that give you the distinct possibility of ramping things up all the way to someone dying and perhaps you going to jail, how come you guys aren't connoisseurs of reasonable escalation and the art of de-escalation?
    Sometimes it's not possible. 20 years ago I experienced an event that changed my life when a man broke into my house and held me and my boyfriend hostage, a huge man who was very high on crack and powerful like a freight train. When you are dealing with an unreasonable or unstable person or someone who is on drugs and threatening your safety in your own home, there is no 'reasonable' approach, no 'art of de-escalation.'



  18. #38
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    You gun slinger/castle defender types: Since you have weapons that give you the distinct possibility of ramping things up all the way to someone dying and perhaps you going to jail, how come you guys aren't connoisseurs of reasonable escalation and the art of de-escalation?
    So in your world, a person who normally legally carries is causing people to escalate?


    I have to say, the condition of the car does matter.
    Though the comment that you can not assume what anyone is going to do is accurate, it is probably safer to assume (eek that word) that the guy wearing the 3 piece suit driving a nice car and leaves a coherent note on your door is less likely to be a problem than three hippy types whose note makes no sense even after it is explained.



  19. #39
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    Jan. 5, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    You gun slinger/castle defender types: Since you have weapons that give you the distinct possibility of ramping things up all the way to someone dying and perhaps you going to jail, how come you guys aren't connoisseurs of reasonable escalation and the art of de-escalation?

    I don't mean to criticize. It's a serious question. My dad, the gun dude in our family, was gung-ho about using a gun only as the very, very last resort. Are others not so serious? What did I miss?
    this post.

    Quote Originally Posted by Belg View Post
    Let me clarify this point. I'm not some gungho dude with a gun. The last thing I do is wave it around. But I absolutely make sure I've got it on me if I feel there is the potential for someone else to have one with less than decent motives. The last thing I ever want to have to do is pull the trigger with a living person between the dots... but I'd rather do that than say goodbye to my wife because I couldn't protect either of us.
    Nudging "Almost Heaven" a little closer still...
    http://www.wvhorsetrainer.com



  20. #40
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    Jul. 5, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscreeksh View Post
    GAD!! I'm not impressed with the law enforcement in Texas, judging from this account!! We are planning to relocate to NE Texas - 75 miles from Dallas. The sherriff's casual response to your call would have me worried!!
    In Texas they just give you time to shoot the suspect yourself. Since a high percentage of citizen are packin'
    The more perfect our happiness,
    the more nagging and wretched
    do our unsolved problems seem.
    ~ Gordon Grand


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