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  1. #1
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    Default Another pony pricing question

    I am having a difficult time determining a reasonable price to market my pony. He is a smaller large at 5 yrs old 13.3-14.0. He is bred very well. He may or may not have the step for the regular larges but certainly has the scope. He has great movement on the flat and an awesome jump and has changes. He is still green and has not stepped into a show ring.
    What would you pay?

    If anyone could also give advice on how to determine if said pony will have the stride with out having to set the jumps at that height... what would you want to see as a buyer

    TIA



  2. #2
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    Default

    Pictures would help



  3. #3
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    Default

    I don't think I am capable of posting pictures and pony is currently being advertised so I do not want to violate any of the posting rules. I guess that the issues in question are his smaller size, green status (he is w,t,c and jumping small courses yet is ridden inconsistently) and ability to do the regulars. He jumps in the BEST form.



  4. #4
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    Probably 5k. Would be more if he for sure had the step for larges



  5. #5
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    I'd pay 10-15k depending JUST how promising this pony looked. If I tried it and it was as well bred as you say and I thought it would have the step for the larges, I'd be willing to muster up 15k for it.

    Why don't you set up some courses/lines that mimic the large division at an A/AA show and see how he does? It doesn't have to be elaborate, just set on the right distances (these can be easily found online), 3' vertical in, 3' rampy oxer out, a little fill if you can. See what happens!



  6. #6
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    Aug. 21, 2012
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    Hunter/jumper folks are so fixated on height its pathetic at times. Nothing says a 14.0 hand pony can't do the larges better than something 14.2. Unfortunately; that's the downfall with the height obsession. An inch or two isn't going to matter. With that being said, the 5,000 mark is about right. You could probably get a little more if he has the pedigree and the movement/jump. I'd start getting him out to at least some solid schooling shows. He's 5 years old and most people want a w,t,c and jumping pony to at least have done something by now. Even if it's just a hack and one o/f class. It'll help his marketability.If he's fancy; buyers may look past his lack of height.



  7. #7
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    I would say between 5 and 10K depending on conformation and movement.

    ETA you might want to lease him to a kid whom you know is a good rider and let her show him around while he's for sale to get him some show miles, and get him seen at the local shows



  8. #8
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    May. 28, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunterrider23 View Post
    Probably 5k. Would be more if he for sure had the step for larges
    At the very high end given the stated description. You can get ponies like this for free right now. I looked at one in that price range last weekend: same size, very fancy mover at trot and canter, very pretty but not flashy (no white), cute jump, W/T/C with the beginnings of lead change, far enough along for an experienced kid to finish with occasional pro rides, but no show miles, AND not enough step. In my view, not worth the time and dollars to finish at any price.
    "That is why you have a pony..." - Edgewood, 2011



  9. #9

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    As someone currently shopping for a large green, i think this is a difficult sell because of pony's size. I am no expert but, to me, if it is not going to be able to do the "division," I do not want to spend a lot of money and have to put in a lot of work on a green pony that is going to end up a fancy children's pony. As you describe it, I am thinking $5-$8k, but if you could get a video of it at a show doing even a 2' schooling division (i always prefer video with a child riding) & easily getting down the lines, I would raise that to $10-$12k.



  10. #10
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    All good opinions and advice. I think proving this pony can do the stride is the most important...



  11. #11
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    People like to think there is no legitimate reason for ponies to be as big as possible, but there is and it has little to do with the athletic abilities of a smaller pony. Trainers know size has little to do with who gets down the lines easiest, there are plenty of huge Childrens Ponies out there that didn't cut it in the division. The legitimate reason is that kids grow so darn fast. It doesn't make any sense to buy a 14h large, which the kid will likely look big on by the end of the year, when there's a 14.2h large of equal quality that will take much longer to outgrow. For this reason, OP, your pony will be a very difficult sell no matter how much training you put into him or how talented he is, and that is going to affect his value right now. I'd probably start at $10K and be thrilled if I got $7500 out of him.
    We don't have to agree on anything to be kind to one another
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by daisycutter87 View Post
    Hunter/jumper folks are so fixated on height its pathetic at times. Nothing says a 14.0 hand pony can't do the larges better than something 14.2. Unfortunately; that's the downfall with the height obsession.
    The difference that height makes (and body build generally) is in how long a growing teenage kid will present a "suitable" image on the pony -- not the underlying athletic capabilities of the pony. This particular pony sounds like it is at least a year away (2014 season) from the greens and two years away from the regulars. My kid will have "outgrown" the 14 hand horse long before its finished whereas she "might" eek out its regular year on a 14.2 one. Why should I invest in something she's not going to be able to really show. And other than the uber-talented flashy ones (particularly where they think they can get the smaller measure), the professionals aren't investing in them either.
    "That is why you have a pony..." - Edgewood, 2011



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dags View Post
    People like to think there is no legitimate reason for ponies to be as big as possible, but there is and it has little to do with the athletic abilities of a smaller pony. Trainers know size has little to do with who gets down the lines easiest, there are plenty of huge Childrens Ponies out there that didn't cut it in the division. The legitimate reason is that kids grow so darn fast. It doesn't make any sense to buy a 14h large, which the kid will likely look big on by the end of the year, when there's a 14.2h large of equal quality that will take much longer to outgrow.
    JINX!
    "That is why you have a pony..." - Edgewood, 2011



  14. #14
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    Get an exact measurement. A cold measure at 13.3 could be made to be 13.2 with some work (I say "could" because I have no idea if this pony is shod, etc). Now you say "13.3 - 14.0" so don't know exactly what that means, but yes, size is THAT important.

    I would agree in the range of $5-8K MAX as described and only if it's got the potential you mention.
    Unfortunately with a large, they will be competing against mostly top of the line larges in the division and the pony will likely be at a disadvantage. In addition, as stated, the kids will not have much time on it, which is why often that sized pony ends up a children's pony.



  15. #15
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    I agree with 5K mostly because the pony has NO show ring experience and is ridden inconsistently. His size would be a huge deterrant for someone looking for a division pony. It is not as crucial for a pony who does the children's to be quite as big. Also, most people looking for an A or AA rated large pony hunter aren't looking for something with no show experience whatsoever.

    If you want to increase your pony's value, get him out to some shows. Prove that he can jump around consistently and get his changes at a strange place over strange fences with a child. Once he is doing that, people will be more likely to seriously consider him.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bent Hickory View Post
    You can get ponies like this for free right now.
    I don't know where you live, but around here I don't often see anyone standing in front of Albertson's with a box full of free ponies, lol



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by OGSponymom View Post
    I don't know where you live, but around here I don't often see anyone standing in front of Albertson's with a box full of free ponies, lol
    Virginia. Plenty of breeders with dreams of $50K green ponies after that Pony Finals Auction four or five years ago (2007? 2008?), now with fields of four and five year olds but without funds or kids to bring them along or a market willing to pay a reasonable ROI. The really good ones may have been sold, but the ones with a "hole" (bad size, not pretty, average mover, average jump, spooky, no change) are still there and aren't moving. I've been offered my share of these for little to nothing.

    The horse market is still tough; the pony market is ruthless. I see more and more kids going from their smalls/mediums straight to horses (most likely, including mine).
    "That is why you have a pony..." - Edgewood, 2011



  18. #18
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    I guess I need to move to Virginia! Around here it's very rare to find a well-bred pony with good movement and conformation for under $2,500 (and more if they're really flashy) - not that that's expensive, but certainly not free! Put some show miles on them and the price only goes up. Of course size factors in, but it doesn't take them completely out of the market. I actually saw a large green pony with so so movement and a terrible jump go for $15,000 recently (sold as an "A show hunter" no less, good luck with that when your pony jumps like a cow), solely because of its color - but that's a story for another day.

    Bent Hickory - not trying to pick a fight or even say that you're wrong, I just think this is an issue of geography



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by OGSponymom View Post
    I guess I need to move to Virginia! Around here it's very rare to find a well-bred pony with good movement and conformation for under $2,500 (and more if they're really flashy) - not that that's expensive, but certainly not free! Put some show miles on them and the price only goes up. Of course size factors in, but it doesn't take them completely out of the market. I actually saw a large green pony with so so movement and a terrible jump go for $15,000 recently (sold as an "A show hunter" no less, good luck with that when your pony jumps like a cow), solely because of its color - but that's a story for another day.

    Bent Hickory - not trying to pick a fight or even say that you're wrong, I just think this is an issue of geography
    well don't forget, Virginia is the land of the pony breeders. There are always lots and lots of ponies for sale, and not enough kids to buy them, basic supply and demand in this area.



  20. #20
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    Indeed, I guess we should ask OP where she lives in order to more accurately answer her query.



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