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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    875

    Default

    I've also heard that no matter you choice for tack make sure you have a reason for it. He may not like it but if you have a *legitimate* reason and not an excuse for using it he can take it.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2005
    Posts
    1,218

    Default

    Side note: Did anybody notice the spelling for this clinic on his website? Just took a peek and it says "Onterio" - hehe.

    I will be bookmarking this in case I can ever find a way to convince him to come further east... though I'm thinking I may just have to hope he goes somewhere in New England and make the trek down.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,451

    Default

    He will not care about brown boots and helmet.

    He will want you to come with spurs and a crop...WEAR YOUR Spurs. if he decides you dont need them, he will take them off. NEVER have I seen him take a stick away, spurs, yes. I see him in every clinic make everyone have spurs on to start...sometimes the rider only makes it 10 mins with the spurs then he has them taken off.

    No need to braid. just a nicely pulled mane that lays down flat.

    CLEAN horse, CLEAN tack, CLEAN rider, CLEAN boots.

    Listen, listen, listen. try, try, try.

    Do the above and you will be golden. He only gets really irritated if he has to repeat himself. Also, watch the others, if someone does it right, or is complimented- copy them. if someone does it wrong, DONT DO THAT!
    "If you are nervous you arent focused-if you are focused, there is no room for nerves!"




  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    234

    Default

    Have a great time. I was supposed to ride in this clinic also but my horse got injured a few weeks ago and will not be ridable by then. So, disappointed but still going to audit.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2000
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    15,086

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bhrunner06 View Post
    CLEAN horse, CLEAN tack, CLEAN rider, CLEAN boots.

    Listen, listen, listen. try, try, try.

    Do the above and you will be golden. He only gets really irritated if he has to repeat himself. Also, watch the others, if someone does it right, or is complimented- copy them. if someone does it wrong, DONT DO THAT!
    Words to live by in many situations!



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2007
    Location
    Northern Va
    Posts
    639

    Default

    Nothing to add that is different from what everyone else said, just wanted to wish you luck! I rode in his clinic in Virginia today and it was a great experience. I took my green 5 year old mare and we ha a blast - even with a ton of mistakes, I felt like we both learned a lot.
    "A canter is the cure for every evil."



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2010
    Posts
    566

    Default

    No need to braid. I can't imagine brown boots/helmet being an issue, just make sure there is no "bling" anywhere on you.

    I would wear a small spur (or he will tell you to put one on) and carry a stick. I'd go with a plain leather girth. unless it would really make your horse unhappy. He will comment on anything else.

    Stick with plain Fillis stirrups if you can. And no happy mouth bit.

    Make sure everything is extremely clean and have a friend wipe the bottom of your boots after you get on.

    And listen carefully to everything he says, and watch the other riders, and try to do everything that you are told. He is not an ogre. Most snide comments that I have seen him make seemed more tongue in cheek than anything. You should learn a lot and have a great time!



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2011
    Location
    Its not nowhere, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    3,969

    Default

    Possibly a stupid thought, and really more of a question to those in the know, but I haven't seen (I don't think) anyone mention matching your spur strap to your boot. If you are wearing brown boots, shouldn't you have brown spur straps?
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,451

    Default

    Rustbreeches... Yes- they should match.
    "If you are nervous you arent focused-if you are focused, there is no room for nerves!"




  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2008
    Location
    at work and the barn...middle of nowhere PA
    Posts
    247

    Default

    Just wanted to chime in bc I just got home from his clinic in MD, and I really think it was the best one I have ever been to (and I've been to a lot). The groups were fantastic this year, which certainly helped, but he was friendly yet tough, he worked hard to remember your name and information about your horse as well as who your instructor is. There were a lot of pros, which is awesome, I always love seeing professionals who work to improve themselves.

    Notes:
    He wore brown tall boots
    He forgot to put a helmet on once, but put it on immediately after realizing
    He lives off of V8 and coca cola
    He will love your horse if it is forward and bold, and especially if it's a TB (there were quite a few at this clinic and they did fantastically)
    If you really listen, he will praise you, no matter your skill level
    Plain stirrups! Bendy ones are worse than black
    If you hold a horse while he mounts, hold the reins near the bit, but not the bit
    He doesn't care about boots/polos/martingales unless they are illfitted or dirty
    Don't let your horse sniff him when he comes to adjust you
    He has a good sense of humor (really!)
    He knows he's funny

    That's all I can think of right now, but you will love it, he's the best for a reason.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31

    Default

    One tiny detail that just popped into my head.

    If your horse requires a breastplate and a martingale, use both, NOT a martingale attachment on the breastplate.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
    Posts
    2,931

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MyGiantPony View Post
    One tiny detail that just popped into my head.

    If your horse requires a breastplate and a martingale, use both, NOT a martingale attachment on the breastplate.
    What's his reasoning for this?
    .
    .
    .



  13. #33

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
    What's his reasoning for this?
    The attachments can't be adjusted to function properly. I happen to agree.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2012
    Posts
    75

    Default

    Here's a quick article my 14yr old daughter wrote after riding with GM the first time in 2010 (includes comments on listening, spurs, and more):


    If you are a rider, you have undoubtedly heard of the infamous George Morris. From his reputation as one of the most well-known teachers of hunt-seat equitation, to his many books and the high-profile equitation championships that he has judged around the world, his name alone brings fear to the modern English rider.
    George Morris’s famously harsh teaching style has left many a rider shaking in their boots, and even the toughest of them have been knocked down by his words. After getting the opportunity to ride with him in December 2010, I proudly present you with a list of the Top 10 Do’s and Don’ts for Riding with George Morris:
    • Dress well: No matter what, you are putting on a show when you are riding. As many have read in his articles and books, he believes that attire should be neat, clean, and always using classic, practical tack. Much like Pony Club, he believes that you don’t have to have the most expensive equipment out there, so long as it is clean, well cared for, and it is what works best for you and your mount.
    • SUFFER!!!!! As he told us at the clinic, “I don’t care that it’s cold, I don’t care that you have been sitting here for hours, and I don’t care that you are hungry! If you love something, you will do whatever you can to learn more and better yourself. That is what I have been doing my entire life! It doesn’t matter if I am too hot, or too cold, or too hungry, I keep going, because I love it.”
    • Always listen: Even when he and his assistant are riding horses, always be listening and watching. One of the highlights of the clinic was watching him get on the different horses, and seeing them improve over the short time that he rode. It was incredible to see him, at his age (72), get on a new horse and ride them for a short amount of time, riding them better than their owner. He would often quiz people, asking them what they had learned, and questioning them about why he was doing something. Thinking on your feet was a good attribute.
    • Don’t take shortcuts: He believed that riding is about true horsemanship, and you can’t just take the easier route to get there. That means that you can’t just use a different saddle to make your position perfect, you can’t just get a horse on the bit using draw reins, or achieve your goal by tricks. No contraption can replace good riding, and sometimes you have to work from the ground up. True horsemanship is the only way to get what you want from horses, you have to do it using the basics, and it is a lifelong pursuit.
    • Watch others ride: The biggest part of the clinic was learning from other’s mistakes. If another girl got six strides in the five-stride line, then you had better not make the same error. If a rider dared to repeat a mistake, his favorite line was “She’s not really very bright, is she?” But you might be praised for making sure that you didn’t make the same mistake. “That’s a thinker!” He exclaimed after watching one girl correct the mistakes that were made earlier. He didn’t get mad if you made one mistake, but you needed to fix it fast, and not repeat the same thing.
    • Have and not need, not the other way around: This is one of the famous quotes of George Morris. Always use a running martingale, just in case your horse throws its head, always wear spurs, and always carry a crop. Although I was riding a horse described as “steer-able dynamite,” I was required to wear spurs and give my horse a stick off the ground at the Liverpool, just like everyone else.
    • Use progression of the aids: The principle that was followed at the clinic was that if you want a horse to go forward, you use the simple progression of the aids. First, you use your calf. Then, you can use your spur to ask if they don’t listen. Then your voice with a quiet cluck. If that doesn’t work it’s time to “stroke” them with your stick, just as it sounds, not smacking them with it, but just touching them with the end. Then, if they still aren’t listening or going forward from your leg, smack them! The theory is that if you have a hot horse, you can stop after putting your leg on, but if you have a lazy horse, you can wake them up while asking them as nicely as possible.
    • Use metal Fillis stirrup irons: Don’t bother with the hinged stirrups or the black stirrups, because “They don’t support you properly. The hinged stirrups give where you need them most, and the black ones are too light, and so they fly around instead of weighting your heel and leg.” He told one girl using black stirrups: “You don’t do yourself any favors using those, and you need all the favors you can get when you ride.”
    • Don’t be weak: One rider he berated for being too kind to her horse. “I want you to treat that horse the way that you treat your husband when he didn’t buy you the earrings that you wanted for your birthday! Don’t be afraid to tell him to listen to you!” He also spoke about horses being animals that thrive on discipline. “We aren’t being cruel, or mean, because we aren’t acting out of emotion, but we correct them when they make mistakes.” When she finished the clinic, he teased her, “I want you to go home and treat your husband the same way that you treat that horse of yours!”
    • Keep Learning: “Look at how old I am, and I still read books, talk to people, and continue my education! I don’t sit around and say that I know everything because I’m old and famous. Why would you people get to sit around and stop learning either?” He told the audience. “I learn different ways to do things every day, and I keep my brain open so that I can take them in. That’s what makes me different from other horse people.”

    Overall, the clinic was a great experience, and it was amazing to ride with someone with so much knowledge and experience to share. I rode with him for two hours a day Friday through Sunday, and watched the other two groups at the clinics ride for another four hours a day, so it was many hours of trying to absorb thousands of important concepts that he’s acquired over a lifetime. In those hours I discovered that George Morris is more than his Olympic medals (silver & gold), more than the chef d’equipe of the US Olympic Show Jumping team, and much more than a fearsome teacher -- he is an amazing horseman who is willing to demonstrate and teach to all who are passionate about the pursuit of true horsemanship.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    4,716

    Default

    You must be proud of your daughter.

    Well considered and well written!



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2000
    Location
    Brantford, Ontario
    Posts
    3,073

    Default

    Thank you so much for all the suggestions! I sincerely appreciate the input and am making notes as I read the thread.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2011
    Location
    Its not nowhere, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    3,969

    Default

    So in the midst of my envy/jealousy/awe of attending a GM clinic, I can't help but observe that it takes more prep work than being presented at the British court, or meeting the Pope.

    Would still love to do it!!
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2000
    Location
    Brantford, Ontario
    Posts
    3,073

    Default

    rustbreeches - It's really not that bad. It won't be a ton of extra work to turn my horse and I out to his standards, I don't think. It's more that I don't want to waste valuable learning time by inciting a lecture on something that I could easily take care of ahead of time (like the spurs, which I will be wearing!).



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2004
    Location
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    1,096

    Thumbs up EXCELLENT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by eaconlee View Post
    Here's a quick article my 14yr old daughter wrote after riding with GM the first time in 2010 (includes comments on listening, spurs, and more):


    If you are a rider, you have undoubtedly heard of the infamous George Morris. From his reputation as one of the most well-known teachers of hunt-seat equitation, to his many books and the high-profile equitation championships that he has judged around the world, his name alone brings fear to the modern English rider.
    George Morris’s famously harsh teaching style has left many a rider shaking in their boots, and even the toughest of them have been knocked down by his words. After getting the opportunity to ride with him in December 2010, I proudly present you with a list of the Top 10 Do’s and Don’ts for Riding with George Morris:
    • Dress well: No matter what, you are putting on a show when you are riding. As many have read in his articles and books, he believes that attire should be neat, clean, and always using classic, practical tack. Much like Pony Club, he believes that you don’t have to have the most expensive equipment out there, so long as it is clean, well cared for, and it is what works best for you and your mount.
    • SUFFER!!!!! As he told us at the clinic, “I don’t care that it’s cold, I don’t care that you have been sitting here for hours, and I don’t care that you are hungry! If you love something, you will do whatever you can to learn more and better yourself. That is what I have been doing my entire life! It doesn’t matter if I am too hot, or too cold, or too hungry, I keep going, because I love it.”
    • Always listen: Even when he and his assistant are riding horses, always be listening and watching. One of the highlights of the clinic was watching him get on the different horses, and seeing them improve over the short time that he rode. It was incredible to see him, at his age (72), get on a new horse and ride them for a short amount of time, riding them better than their owner. He would often quiz people, asking them what they had learned, and questioning them about why he was doing something. Thinking on your feet was a good attribute.
    • Don’t take shortcuts: He believed that riding is about true horsemanship, and you can’t just take the easier route to get there. That means that you can’t just use a different saddle to make your position perfect, you can’t just get a horse on the bit using draw reins, or achieve your goal by tricks. No contraption can replace good riding, and sometimes you have to work from the ground up. True horsemanship is the only way to get what you want from horses, you have to do it using the basics, and it is a lifelong pursuit.
    • Watch others ride: The biggest part of the clinic was learning from other’s mistakes. If another girl got six strides in the five-stride line, then you had better not make the same error. If a rider dared to repeat a mistake, his favorite line was “She’s not really very bright, is she?” But you might be praised for making sure that you didn’t make the same mistake. “That’s a thinker!” He exclaimed after watching one girl correct the mistakes that were made earlier. He didn’t get mad if you made one mistake, but you needed to fix it fast, and not repeat the same thing.
    • Have and not need, not the other way around: This is one of the famous quotes of George Morris. Always use a running martingale, just in case your horse throws its head, always wear spurs, and always carry a crop. Although I was riding a horse described as “steer-able dynamite,” I was required to wear spurs and give my horse a stick off the ground at the Liverpool, just like everyone else.
    • Use progression of the aids: The principle that was followed at the clinic was that if you want a horse to go forward, you use the simple progression of the aids. First, you use your calf. Then, you can use your spur to ask if they don’t listen. Then your voice with a quiet cluck. If that doesn’t work it’s time to “stroke” them with your stick, just as it sounds, not smacking them with it, but just touching them with the end. Then, if they still aren’t listening or going forward from your leg, smack them! The theory is that if you have a hot horse, you can stop after putting your leg on, but if you have a lazy horse, you can wake them up while asking them as nicely as possible.
    • Use metal Fillis stirrup irons: Don’t bother with the hinged stirrups or the black stirrups, because “They don’t support you properly. The hinged stirrups give where you need them most, and the black ones are too light, and so they fly around instead of weighting your heel and leg.” He told one girl using black stirrups: “You don’t do yourself any favors using those, and you need all the favors you can get when you ride.”
    • Don’t be weak: One rider he berated for being too kind to her horse. “I want you to treat that horse the way that you treat your husband when he didn’t buy you the earrings that you wanted for your birthday! Don’t be afraid to tell him to listen to you!” He also spoke about horses being animals that thrive on discipline. “We aren’t being cruel, or mean, because we aren’t acting out of emotion, but we correct them when they make mistakes.” When she finished the clinic, he teased her, “I want you to go home and treat your husband the same way that you treat that horse of yours!”
    • Keep Learning: “Look at how old I am, and I still read books, talk to people, and continue my education! I don’t sit around and say that I know everything because I’m old and famous. Why would you people get to sit around and stop learning either?” He told the audience. “I learn different ways to do things every day, and I keep my brain open so that I can take them in. That’s what makes me different from other horse people.”

    Overall, the clinic was a great experience, and it was amazing to ride with someone with so much knowledge and experience to share. I rode with him for two hours a day Friday through Sunday, and watched the other two groups at the clinics ride for another four hours a day, so it was many hours of trying to absorb thousands of important concepts that he’s acquired over a lifetime. In those hours I discovered that George Morris is more than his Olympic medals (silver & gold), more than the chef d’equipe of the US Olympic Show Jumping team, and much more than a fearsome teacher -- he is an amazing horseman who is willing to demonstrate and teach to all who are passionate about the pursuit of true horsemanship.
    very well done!!!! I LOVED the husband/ear rings LOL!! and can JUST hear him saying that
    Aefvue Farm Ft.Lauderdale



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Location
    The Part of TN in the Wrong Time Zone
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    So why exactly does he hate happy mouth and rubber bits?



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