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  1. #21
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    Sep. 28, 2001
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    Kentucky
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    So sorry to hear this! Is yours in the center of the eye? My vet said these are the hardest to heal.

    Please let me know how the vet appointment goes this week.



  2. #22
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    May. 5, 2009
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    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
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    2,732

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    My guys was in the center. His iris ended up prolapsing, hence the enucleation. My guy had a fungal infection. I can't remember his whole course of treatment but we did manage to save his remaining eye (which had not prolapsed.)
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  3. #23
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    Sep. 28, 2001
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    Kentucky
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    There is an old appy at the farm who just came in one day with his eye completely white. Vet said the lens luxated. She will have to remove the eye or put him down eventually. The weird thing is, he is not the least bit painful with it at this point. He has bad cataracts in the other eye so he is pretty much blind now.

    I've never seen so many eye issues in my life!



  4. #24
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    May. 28, 2011
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    35

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    Id be interested in how you proceed. I spent pretty much the entire last year treating my older guys eyes. First had a issue with the left eye that ending in a keratectomy. The day before he was cleared with that eye, he injured the other eye and another keratectomy. We spent from December until this week eye injury free but im sad to say he has another ulcer in the origional eye. Debriding done today and im hopeful it heals, otherwise we will be back to the vet school next week.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2009
    Location
    Fort Collins, Colorado
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    784

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    Have you considered acupuncture? I have seen it correct conditions that were unresponsive to traditional Western medicine.

    Check this out:

    "Ocular disorders such as difficult to heal corneal ulcers, chronic conjunctivitis, and eyelid muscle weakness may be helped by acupuncture treatment." It refers to dogs, but might be worth a shot?

    http://www.professorshouse.com/Pets/...ture-for-Dogs/

    Also:

    Cold Laser/Infra-red (IR) Stimulator

    These units can be useful in stimulating acupuncture points that are difficult to treat any other way. In the equine, this is most commonly seen in the treatment of points on the extremities (head, legs). Caution should be taken with the use of lasers as damage to the eye can occur. The use of Infrared Stimulators such as the CEFCO model can be safely used for eye conditions and is especially useful with corneal ulcers

    https://www.aaep.org/health_articles_view.php?id=314
    Nothing with horses is ever easy or cheap. And if it is, you're doing it wrong. They always rip out part of your soul when they leave. I guess that's how they find us later.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2010
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    All 'round Canadia
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    Quote Originally Posted by caryledee View Post
    Do you remember how long you treated it for, before the keratectomy? The vet was pretty positive that the keratectomy was going to be the answer but unfortunately there has been no change.

    Glad your horse got better! I think eye pain is the worst.
    It was around 3 weeks, I think. After every debridement it would kind of start healing, and then just...stop. Another debridement, again looked like it would start to close in, and again stall out. Rinse, repeat. Vet did cultures and nothing, but we ended up treating for both bacterial and fungal just in case - no improvement.

    But thankfully it healed rapidly after the keratectomy and stayed well. Of course since then her flymask is practically sutured to her money-sucking face until the snows come.



  7. #27
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    Sep. 26, 2012
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    47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelony View Post
    Id be interested in how you proceed. I spent pretty much the entire last year treating my older guys eyes. First had a issue with the left eye that ending in a keratectomy. The day before he was cleared with that eye, he injured the other eye and another keratectomy. We spent from December until this week eye injury free but im sad to say he has another ulcer in the origional eye. Debriding done today and im hopeful it heals, otherwise we will be back to the vet school next week.
    Sorry you are going through this too! I am not sure how to proceed! I have considered going to a vet school, though we have the best referral clinics here so I'm not sure if that would make sense. I am also unclear if these things are caused by injuries or if corneal disease can cause these ulcers alone.

    Have you taken your horse to a vet school for his other ulcers? Or does your regular vet usually treat him?



  8. #28
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    Sep. 26, 2012
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    47

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    Quote Originally Posted by twelvegates View Post
    Have you considered acupuncture? I have seen it correct conditions that were unresponsive to traditional Western medicine.

    Check this out:

    "Ocular disorders such as difficult to heal corneal ulcers, chronic conjunctivitis, and eyelid muscle weakness may be helped by acupuncture treatment." It refers to dogs, but might be worth a shot?

    http://www.professorshouse.com/Pets/...ture-for-Dogs/

    Also:

    Cold Laser/Infra-red (IR) Stimulator

    These units can be useful in stimulating acupuncture points that are difficult to treat any other way. In the equine, this is most commonly seen in the treatment of points on the extremities (head, legs). Caution should be taken with the use of lasers as damage to the eye can occur. The use of Infrared Stimulators such as the CEFCO model can be safely used for eye conditions and is especially useful with corneal ulcers

    https://www.aaep.org/health_articles_view.php?id=314
    Interesting! The vet I am currently using is an acupuncturist so I will have to ask her if she has tried this yet. Thanks for the suggestion!



  9. #29
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    Sep. 26, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coanteen View Post
    It was around 3 weeks, I think. After every debridement it would kind of start healing, and then just...stop. Another debridement, again looked like it would start to close in, and again stall out. Rinse, repeat. Vet did cultures and nothing, but we ended up treating for both bacterial and fungal just in case - no improvement.

    But thankfully it healed rapidly after the keratectomy and stayed well. Of course since then her flymask is practically sutured to her money-sucking face until the snows come.
    Yep, that is exactly what my guy has done for 3 months now. Heal, stall, regress. It's so depressing. He is one of the prettiest moving horses I've had...he is like perfect other than this issue. I am about to pull my hair out.

    Money sucking face....



  10. #30
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2011
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    35

    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by caryledee1 View Post
    Sorry you are going through this too! I am not sure how to proceed! I have considered going to a vet school, though we have the best referral clinics here so I'm not sure if that would make sense. I am also unclear if these things are caused by injuries or if corneal disease can cause these ulcers alone.

    Have you taken your horse to a vet school for his other ulcers? Or does your regular vet usually treat him?
    I have done both, Started with the vet, then i was in Florida for the winter so we saw a specialist there, came back home and continued with the vet until we finally went to NC State. This time around the vet has been out twice however if it doesnt improve by next week i will go back to the vet school. My regret from last year was not getting the Keratectomy sooner. You will spend more $ by multiple vet check ups then the surgery and the eye healed much faster after the surgery. I to am pretty much out of funds and really dont know what to do. I feel like there is something in his system that is causing these or at the least not allowing his eye to heal as normal horses do. I pray that he gets better and i dont have to make any decisions to give up



  11. #31
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    Sep. 28, 2001
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    Kentucky
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelony View Post
    I have done both, Started with the vet, then i was in Florida for the winter so we saw a specialist there, came back home and continued with the vet until we finally went to NC State. This time around the vet has been out twice however if it doesnt improve by next week i will go back to the vet school. My regret from last year was not getting the Keratectomy sooner. You will spend more $ by multiple vet check ups then the surgery and the eye healed much faster after the surgery. I to am pretty much out of funds and really dont know what to do. I feel like there is something in his system that is causing these or at the least not allowing his eye to heal as normal horses do. I pray that he gets better and i dont have to make any decisions to give up
    I agree. I had my guy tested for PPID because that can cause frequent corneal ulcers. It was a long shot, but I had to rule it out.

    It is so hard to know what to do! My guy's second ulcer healed in a week with no special treatment. So I was really hoping at first that this one would go the same way, but no such luck.

    I was thinking today that if it comes down to it, I should donate him to a university instead of euthanizing him. Maybe someone could learn something from his condition and help future horses.



  12. #32
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    May. 28, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by caryledee View Post
    I agree. I had my guy tested for PPID because that can cause frequent corneal ulcers. It was a long shot, but I had to rule it out.

    It is so hard to know what to do! My guy's second ulcer healed in a week with no special treatment. So I was really hoping at first that this one would go the same way, but no such luck.

    I was thinking today that if it comes down to it, I should donate him to a university instead of euthanizing him. Maybe someone could learn something from his condition and help future horses.
    Im sorry your going thru this, our stories are similar. I should have mentioned that we discussed PPID also and since it was last fall, we could not reliably test for it so i started Peroglide anyway. Until last week, i thought it helped although I am not sure now. Its interesting that your guy's second Ulcer healed well, thats alittle hope.... I wish I could give you advice on how to proceed !



  13. #33
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    Is there any uveitis? If uveitis is making him scratch and causing the ulcers, treating the uveitis might prevent more ulcers. A friend's horse had a cyclosporin implant last week. Hopefully, that will prevent him from having more uveitis and ulcers.



  14. #34
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    Sep. 26, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelony View Post
    Im sorry your going thru this, our stories are similar. I should have mentioned that we discussed PPID also and since it was last fall, we could not reliably test for it so i started Peroglide anyway. Until last week, i thought it helped although I am not sure now. Its interesting that your guy's second Ulcer healed well, thats alittle hope.... I wish I could give you advice on how to proceed !
    Thanks! Apparently there is a new test at Cornell that they can do in the fall. My guy is young and doesn't look anything like a PPID horse would look, but it was worth it to test for it anyway, IMO. At least now I know. The new vet has told me that if we can get this ulcer cleared up, we can try keeping him on serum all the time and that might keep the ulcers at bay.



  15. #35
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    Sep. 26, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKB View Post
    Is there any uveitis? If uveitis is making him scratch and causing the ulcers, treating the uveitis might prevent more ulcers. A friend's horse had a cyclosporin implant last week. Hopefully, that will prevent him from having more uveitis and ulcers.
    There is uveitis secondary to the ulcers. My thought in the beginning was that he had ERU, but the uveitis only happens after an ulcer starts.

    Hope your friend's horse improves!



  16. #36
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    You might email the ophthalmologist/uveitis guru at NC State to see if there is anything they have to offer or suggest. Your vet can talk with them if they have ideas.



  17. #37
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    Sep. 28, 2005
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    My horse had an indolent ulcer 6 years ago. First signs of an ulcer in July and finally had conjunctival flap surgery in March! In between the first signs and surgery we did everything! Meds thru a lavage system every 2 hours for so long it was crazy, the optho installed a contact lens and it seemed like that was helping it heal. He went from October to the end of Feb. with the eye looking great and no stain uptake then one day the entire cornea seem to slough off! The surgery finally healed the ulcer and it has been great ever since. He never had an issue with the scar, which is quite large, he seems to see just fine. Last Sept. his "good" eye became swollen and an very small ulcer developed-it became fungal and after 10 weeks of pain and suffering for both of us we had to remove his eye. He is so happy now and is ridden at least 4/5 times a week and he even jumps still It is amazing how comfortable he is with just the one eye(with a scar).
    Have the doctors discussed the flap surgery? Another horse in our barn had to have the same surgery and he healed quite nicely. It gives the ulcer a direct blood supply to facilitate healing.
    It is so hard to deal with eye problems, you know they are in such terrible pain and discomfort. Good Luck and I hope this resolves soon.



  18. #38
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    Nov. 26, 2001
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    Nashville, TN USA
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    Just been treating 1 for a week now and am already wore out and horse really hates me now.



  19. #39
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    Sep. 28, 2001
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    Kentucky
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    Quote Originally Posted by nashfad View Post
    Just been treating 1 for a week now and am already wore out and horse really hates me now.
    I'm sorry. I have been really lucky that my horse is very tolerant of the treatments. Do you give him treats before and after? That is what I started doing in the beginning and it seemed to improve his attitude when he got grumpy. If he wasn't so good about it, I would have to have a lavage put in.



  20. #40
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    Sep. 28, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacqui View Post
    My horse had an indolent ulcer 6 years ago. First signs of an ulcer in July and finally had conjunctival flap surgery in March! In between the first signs and surgery we did everything! Meds thru a lavage system every 2 hours for so long it was crazy, the optho installed a contact lens and it seemed like that was helping it heal. He went from October to the end of Feb. with the eye looking great and no stain uptake then one day the entire cornea seem to slough off! The surgery finally healed the ulcer and it has been great ever since. He never had an issue with the scar, which is quite large, he seems to see just fine. Last Sept. his "good" eye became swollen and an very small ulcer developed-it became fungal and after 10 weeks of pain and suffering for both of us we had to remove his eye. He is so happy now and is ridden at least 4/5 times a week and he even jumps still It is amazing how comfortable he is with just the one eye(with a scar).
    Have the doctors discussed the flap surgery? Another horse in our barn had to have the same surgery and he healed quite nicely. It gives the ulcer a direct blood supply to facilitate healing.
    It is so hard to deal with eye problems, you know they are in such terrible pain and discomfort. Good Luck and I hope this resolves soon.
    Yes, I remember reading your story last year! You certainly have been through a lot. I am glad your boy is doing well now. So the remaining eye has been okay? Do you do anything special to take care of it and make sure he doesn't get any more ulcers?

    I've heard of conjuctival flap surgery; the vets haven't told me we should try something like that yet though. Do you remember what the cost was for it?



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