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  1. #601
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    Quote Originally Posted by goneriding24 View Post
    I went back to reread the rescues FB page, it seems they do need help now. Due to a family illness, they are seriously in the hole. $35K for DR's horses and only 10% covered by donations and the other money was paid for by the rescue owner. Only now she can't do it anymore.

    So, she is asking for more donations. She seems to be pretty open at this point. Can donations go to her to repay her for what she has personally put out or is it only supposed to go for future work done on the horses? I'm not clear on this. Or does it matter?

    She does have some horses, don't know which ones, up for adoption soon.
    I suppose the money would have to be put toward paying the bills....'in the hole' usually means there is a tap at the feed store, the vet, the farrier...or the bank has a say so....

    So I suppose yes. 35k is a year's income!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  2. #602
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    Also, who decides when a horse is ready to go to a new home? Do they have to be a certain weight, judging on height and build, for example? Or maybe some fat put on and hooves cleaned up so horse can walk in a normal manner? Or how much training is put into them, such as starting u/s? I've never given much thought to this.

    When I bought horses from the auction for resale, I had them started fattening up, got their hooves in decent shape, gave shots, checked out their personality and whether they were saddle broke (and how far along) and then resold them. I sure didn't keep them for months and months. This rescue stuff is a bit different than my game plan but I've bought some mighty poor horses and got them back into the game a lot quicker than a lot of these rescues do.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #603
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    Quote Originally Posted by goneriding24 View Post
    I.

    Can donations go to her to repay her for what she has personally put out or is it only supposed to go for future work done on the horses? I'm not clear on this. Or does it matter?

    She does have some horses, don't know which ones, up for adoption soon.
    It depends on how the money she put in was considered: was it a donation that she will be claiming on her tax return as a charitable contribution, or was it always considered a "loan", to be repaid when the entity had funds to do so?

    Technically, if it was considered a loan, it should be in the BOD minutes, as they would have to approve it (the loan). But many small non-profits don't always dot their "i"s and cross their "t"s.

    One could make a restricted donation for the current and future expenses, I would presume, which would should the non-profit from using it for past bills.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #604
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    One think I don't understand is the griping about taking all the horses in this instance, but on the Sporthorse Breeding forum, people are complaining that in the case of JB because they didn't take all of her horses.

    In JB's case, the reasons they should have taken all, not just the underweight, injured ones are bad fencing, horses kept out all the time without adequate shelter, rough/bad feet, likely (but not proven) not being fed adequately, unknown how much feed is on hand and if proper vet care is being undertaken, etc.

    But those same issues are at hand with CC, and it is considered by some unjust to take all and not those that are actively suffering badly.

    So which is it; take only those in dire straights and wait for the others to get worse, or take them all since the person has documentably shown to be unwilling or unable to care for all?

    Or is it a case of "good guy/bad guy"? Most already thought JB was "bad", so she doesn't deserve any horses, but CC was "good" (thought by many at the time) so they should have just been decent and lightened her load by only taking the worst cases to help her out?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #605
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    Feb. 20, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by goneriding24 View Post
    Also, who decides when a horse is ready to go to a new home? Do they have to be a certain weight, judging on height and build, for example? Or maybe some fat put on and hooves cleaned up so horse can walk in a normal manner? Or how much training is put into them, such as starting u/s? I've never given much thought to this.
    I would imagine it depends on the home. A rescue might have a network of foster homes that can handle rehab on severely underweight horses. For the rest, probably case by case with home checking, references, etc. I don't see why someone couldn't adopt a too-thin-to-ride horse, as long as they actually didn't ride it until it was well. The rescue would have to do its due diligence and follow-ups.

    At a minimum for successful adoption they should be evaluated for u/s work. It's one thing to knowingly adopts a horse with issues, or that isn't started, or that's only pasture-sound; but quite another to get such a critter by surprise when you wanted a relatively simple riding prospect.

    Ideally they would be somewhat trained, but "ideally" will be hard to come by when the rescue is already that much in the hole.



  6. #606
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    I wonder why some of the pictures are in black and white as well.
    I'm not sticking up for CCH but I wonder about this other rescue as well.
    Not everything is quite adding up.

    Quote Originally Posted by texan View Post
    From what i have read on another web site, there is more to this story than you all know. Out of over 20 horses only 5 were in poor shape. I wont go into why as there is no excuse. However, the bigger concern now is the rescue, who did no intake pictures, and turned down offers from other rescues for help. This particular rescue is suspect at best, along with why and how the horses were seized. This rescue repeatedly shows the same 5 horses for shock value and conveniently does not include pictures of the other horses. The other horses just so you all know were in good shape with the feet done.
    This rescue now has 100 horses, people did line up to take them and the rescue ignores them. I understand the concern now is, that because the majority of them are well bred mares, the thought is the rescue is using them for breeding. The only thing i will say, and i am not excusing the lady at all for the 5 horses, ABSOLUTELY NO EXCUSE, but the seizure was not legal in anyway shape or form. This is just what i have read on another forum, along with court documents that were posted there.
    I did see some pictures of the other horses and they were NOT skin and bone by anyway shape or form.
    Most people that knew the lady felt the herd should have been split up between all the rescues that wanted to help, as the rescue that has them is crying for hay.



  7. #607
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    I don't know how to quote a quote or if it works or not...but, anywho, that's why I asked earlier if someone can tell by the markings on the horses if they are the same horses or not. I'm not good with Paints, as I wrote, too much jumble of color!

    Just a feeling but after reading the FB page, these horses may be in the fire from the pan...no real info on my side, just a niggle, unless some horses are adopted out, as the rescue owner has stated.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!



  8. #608
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    Jan. 18, 2002
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    canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by JGHIRETIRE View Post
    I wonder why some of the pictures are in black and white as well.
    I'm not sticking up for CCH but I wonder about this other rescue as well.
    Not everything is quite adding up.
    As far as i can tell, this is not a registered rescue. No correct documentation was done at the time of intake. Apparently mares and stallions were placed in holding pens together, and when someone questioned the rescue if they were going to have the mares checked, the rescue said it wasn't their prime concern. You would think that should have been priority, as its not a difficult thing to do, as the vet was checking them anyway. I will say that on the other board, the concern was always the horses. Friends of the rescue were saying that everyone was sticking up for CCH, but that was not the case at all. They questioned whether a one man operation/rescue could actually handle all the horses, and they could not understand why other rescues were not allowed to help. Now this rescue is crying for money because they are in debt. Seems to me maybe they should have thought about that before they set up a rescue. That is what i have a problem with. Any damn fool can hang up a shingle and say they are a rescue, without going through the proper steps and procedures. Its like opening a business with no business plan. Sorry i just dont buy it. I hope for the horses sake they havent ended up in a worse place than they were in, i guess only time will tell.
    www.tayvalleyfarm.com
    My other home.



  9. #609
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    A thought, if only five out of twenty were poor shape, how did this come to $35K in expenses since last September? THAT doesn't add up.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #610
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    Quote Originally Posted by goneriding24 View Post
    A thought, if only five out of twenty were poor shape, how did this come to $35K in expenses since last September? THAT doesn't add up.
    It depends if the money only went to CCH's horses. Wasn't there other horses that were on the property before the seizure?



  11. #611
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    Quote Originally Posted by goneriding24 View Post
    Also, who decides when a horse is ready to go to a new home? Do they have to be a certain weight, judging on height and build, for example? Or maybe some fat put on and hooves cleaned up so horse can walk in a normal manner? Or how much training is put into them, such as starting u/s? I've never given much thought to this.
    A well-run rescue should have a policy on this. Our guys don't go up for adoption until they're at (or close to) a good weight, had vaccinations, coggins, teeth checked (and floated if needed) and we've evaluated them. HOWEVER if a foster home wants to adopt a horse while the horse is still in rehab., we give them a greatly discounted adoption fee and let them (sometimes we waive the adoption fee and the adopter is responsible for all vet work). If someone comes along, gets approved, and wants to adopt a horse before rehab is complete, we normally let them (there are exceptions). I would rather move the horses on out and then be able to help more than to hang onto them forever.

    And a lot of times, I can get them rehabbed and up for adoption in 2-3 months. There are exceptions (especially if I'm really busy and don't have a lot of time to work with one/evaluate him/her). Older horses and those who haven't been handled before sometimes take longer to rehab.
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #612
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirljenn View Post
    A well-run rescue should have a policy on this. Our guys don't go up for adoption until they're at (or close to) a good weight, had vaccinations, coggins, teeth checked (and floated if needed) and we've evaluated them. HOWEVER if a foster home wants to adopt a horse while the horse is still in rehab., we give them a greatly discounted adoption fee and let them (sometimes we waive the adoption fee and the adopter is responsible for all vet work). If someone comes along, gets approved, and wants to adopt a horse before rehab is complete, we normally let them (there are exceptions). I would rather move the horses on out and then be able to help more than to hang onto them forever.

    And a lot of times, I can get them rehabbed and up for adoption in 2-3 months. There are exceptions (especially if I'm really busy and don't have a lot of time to work with one/evaluate him/her). Older horses and those who haven't been handled before sometimes take longer to rehab.
    Now, you're explanation makes more sense to me, not to mention money-wise.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!



  13. #613
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shine View Post
    It depends if the money only went to CCH's horses. Wasn't there other horses that were on the property before the seizure?
    From what I've read, yes, there were. I need to reread, I thought she meant $35K for CC's horses only. Maybe she meant the whole set-up.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!



  14. #614
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    Quote Originally Posted by goneriding24 View Post
    Now, you're explanation makes more sense to me, not to mention money-wise.
    Thanks. We used to not do it that way - I was worried that we needed to rehab. them completely so that people knew what they were getting, didn't have to worry about rehabbing, etc. And I might not want a novice to take on a rehab. case and might steer that person to something a little more appropriate. But if we have someone with experience who can rehab. and is willing to take a chance on the horse, then I would rather move him/her (and do follow-ups) and open a spot for another needy critter.
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com



  15. #615
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    Aug. 5, 2007
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    From their internet site
    http://nnequinerescue.com/


    NNER was founded in early 2012 as a public, non-profit horse rescue ~ prior to that, NNER had been operating as a private rescue, for 14 years, under the care of xxx…

    At NNER, we consider the ULTIMATE rescue success story to be one in which a horse is removed from a bad situation, successfully treated and rehabilitated, and then adopted into the right and perfect forever home for that horse…


    From their forms page EIN:

    Assigning an EIN does not grant tax-exempt status to non-profit organizations.
    Publication 557, Tax Exempt Status for Your Organization, has details on the
    application process, as well as information on returns you may need to file. To apply
    for formal recognition of tax-exempt status, most organizations will need to complete
    either Form 1023, Application for Recognition of Exemption Under Section 501(c)(3) of
    the Internal Revenue Code, or Form 1024, Application for Recognition of Exemption
    Under Section 501(a). Submit the completed form, all applicable attachments, and the
    required user fee to: xxx


    Significantly missing is their Adoption form. If you are not on Facebook, how do you even begin to find a way to qualify?

    This is like listing a horse for sale and refusing to follow through in any way with potential buyers…you aren’t truly trying to sell the horse.

    No adopted horses posted, no available horses posted, no in rehab horses.

    The only thing working is the donate information.



    ++

    As of September 20, 2012
    http://www.kolotv.com/home/headlines...170596096.html

    A horse rescue operation out of Wells, Nevada is hoping to gain custody of 31 horses seized from a Churchill County property two weeks ago. Wednesday, the Justice of the Peace in Fallon ruled the Northeastern Nevada Equine rescue can take the horses, if it pays for the vet bills and board. ...


    For anyone not on facebook, there is no way to find, let alone submit an adoption application, nor any way to find out which, if any, horses are available.

    In less than 12 months this rescue is heading toward non-viability or worse.


    I was under the impression there were upwards of 70 horses at the rescue, but have not seen documentation.

    I sincerely hope someone shows them how to get their horses adopted out or fostered ASAP: this is a serious hole in their business plan.



  16. #616
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    Quote Originally Posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    From their internet site
    http://nnequinerescue.com/


    NNER was founded in early 2012 as a public, non-profit horse rescue ~ prior to that, NNER had been operating as a private rescue, for 14 years, under the care of xxx…

    At NNER, we consider the ULTIMATE rescue success story to be one in which a horse is removed from a bad situation, successfully treated and rehabilitated, and then adopted into the right and perfect forever home for that horse…


    From their forms page EIN:

    Assigning an EIN does not grant tax-exempt status to non-profit organizations.
    Publication 557, Tax Exempt Status for Your Organization, has details on the
    application process, as well as information on returns you may need to file. To apply
    for formal recognition of tax-exempt status, most organizations will need to complete
    either Form 1023, Application for Recognition of Exemption Under Section 501(c)(3) of
    the Internal Revenue Code, or Form 1024, Application for Recognition of Exemption
    Under Section 501(a). Submit the completed form, all applicable attachments, and the
    required user fee to: xxx


    Significantly missing is their Adoption form. If you are not on Facebook, how do you even begin to find a way to qualify?

    This is like listing a horse for sale and refusing to follow through in any way with potential buyers…you aren’t truly trying to sell the horse.

    No adopted horses posted, no available horses posted, no in rehab horses.

    The only thing working is the donate information.



    ++

    As of September 20, 2012
    http://www.kolotv.com/home/headlines...170596096.html

    A horse rescue operation out of Wells, Nevada is hoping to gain custody of 31 horses seized from a Churchill County property two weeks ago. Wednesday, the Justice of the Peace in Fallon ruled the Northeastern Nevada Equine rescue can take the horses, if it pays for the vet bills and board. ...


    For anyone not on facebook, there is no way to find, let alone submit an adoption application, nor any way to find out which, if any, horses are available.

    In less than 12 months this rescue is heading toward non-viability or worse.


    I was under the impression there were upwards of 70 horses at the rescue, but have not seen documentation.

    I sincerely hope someone shows them how to get their horses adopted out or fostered ASAP: this is a serious hole in their business plan.
    I'm not sure that's accurate re: the 70 horses at their rescue and the suggestion that they do not foster out horses:

    The biggest majority of NNER’s rescue horses are located at the main rescue in Wells, NV., but we also have a fantastic foster program in place. Through our foster home program, horses that need more individualized care and attention are able to receive it.
    [my bold]
    from
    http://nnequinerescue.com/About/


    There's also this, from that page, which answers the 'when do they adopt out' question clearly:

    Once a horse is brought into NNER, it is evaluated by our veterinarians and farriers, and then given the treatment that is deemed appropriate for that individual horse. Some horses will require longer and more extensive rehabilitation than others, and NNER will see to it that the needs of each and every animal in our care are met accordingly.
    NNER also works with some of the local trainers when evaluating a horse for their level of training and recommended skill level of the future owner/rider. We have also had some of these trainers start some of our young horses under saddle in an effort to increase their adoption potential.



  17. #617
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    Oct. 11, 2007
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    AF, the above may be true but there is absolutely no proof of it! Most "good" rescues put their success stories out there, list adoptable horses, "pending" horses, have information about how to adopt etc. right off the homepage. Plus getting a good fostering program going in less than a year? In this economy?????

    NNER doesn't really sound like they *want* to adopt out any horses.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  18. #618
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    Aug. 5, 2007
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    Perhaps someone on facebook can offer their adoption form
    or find out the information on horses available
    or provide a link for someone who may want to pursue adopting.



  19. #619
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    Oct. 26, 2010
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    As of yesterday, I didn't look today, they had, what, three horses up for adoption. I didn't look for any forms, just glanced through the page.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!



  20. #620
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    Aug. 5, 2007
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    Since obviously I cannot verify numbers, do they say how many horses they are caring for altogether?

    How many they have adopted or fostered out since they started last year?

    Were the 3 from the Sept. group?

    Again, what are their adopter criteria?


    Thank you.



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