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  1. #1
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    Mar. 8, 2016
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    Default Jobs to afford the equestrian inclined lifestyle

    What jobs, in your experience, have you found support the equestrian inclined lifestyle?
    The delicate balance of money and adequate riding time?
    The flexibility (work from home or off hours) to show and ride in actual daylight, at least sometimes.

    Interested to see what everyone has to say!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2011
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    2,961

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    Any career can as long as you are well established and later in your career. These days I see people jumping in and buying horses when they have no retirement or any savings of any kind.

    So my advice is get a good job, build up a career and savings and then think about horses.
    A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Apr. 15, 2008
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    government lawyer
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Gravity works, and the laws of physics are a bitch.

    Member: Rabid Garden Snail Clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Jul. 21, 2006
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    South Carolina
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    Honest to God, this is why I went to law school. And it worked, too. Although first I had to spend three years in law school (having zero time to ride until my third year) and then five years working for other lawyers (and having limited time to ride). But now I have my own solo practice and the time and money to achieve my (admittedly modest) horse-related goals.
    I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2014
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    469

    Default

    I think there are a lot of options!

    In general, being a talented professional contributor rather than a manager or owner will allow for more flexibility (this how I can sometimes take off early when it's a beautiful day, but my DH never does).

    At places I've boarded, there have been a variety of professions represented including: engineer (multiple), physician assistant, nurse manager, specialty nurse, faculty member, accountant, writer, biochemist....You get the idea.



  6. #6
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    Mar. 8, 2016
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    Default

    FitToBeTied, that would work well if I weren't already 'saddled' with a horse, so to speak

    I'm in accounting now, first year and affording the horse is a stretch, but it's happening. I don't think accounting is where I want to spend my career though, so I'm interested in some other career paths. I don't expect to make six figures in 2 years or only work 30 hour weeks or anything like that. I'm ready to work long and hard, but I have to know that what I'm working towards is worth it, if that makes sense.

    What I'm interested in are careers where it is the rule, not the exception that in 3-5 years you are making a decent living and have the opportunity to work remotely or create your own schedule so riding time isn't terribly compromised.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2003
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,549

    Default

    I think its all relative to who your employer is, where you live, who you want to train with, and cost of board.

    I work as a Business Analyst for Fortune 500 company. I can comfortably keep one horse on full board in my area and as for the time to ride, when I was going through the hiring process flexible hours was a question of mine and I confirmed if I could work between the hours of 7:30 and 4 which gives me plenty of time to ride and have free weekends. Of course some days I work later, but I am able to get to the barn 5-6 days a week for the most part if I wanted to.

    The employers I have had over the last 10 years since graduating have been really good about work/life balance.
    Calm & Collected, 13, OTTB
    Forrest Gump (Catasauqua) , 17, OTTB
    Little Bit Indian, 29, TB
    Owner of Spur of the Moment, Custom made spur straps! Find us on Facebook



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2015
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    81

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    This is why I went to engineering school.

    I work as a Solution Designer in private IT company on the east coast. I don't make 6 figures, but I'm not far from it. And I make more than enough to support one or two horses and show, as well as pay my mortgage, eat well, drive cars that are paid for, and save for my kid's education.

    That said, we don't keep up with the joneses, hubby and I don't go on fancy vacations (we go camping), we drive cars we can afford, and our house is modest.

    But that's the way we like it.



  9. #9
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    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    Conventionally, find a job that pays enough to allow you to lead the lifestyle you would like to become accustomed to. If it involved horses, all the better, but scarce.

    And cut your cloth to fit your style. Somehow, cutting out 'lifestyle' is worth it just to have a horse, and lifestyle becomes unimportant.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
    Location
    Southeast US
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    A scientist with a non-profit research organization. All the perks of academia with none of the drawbacks.

    Early in my career, I couldn't have afforded a fancy horse boarded at a fancy stable that hit the A circuit, but even then, if I hadn't had children to support, I could have afforded a nice horse boarded at a comfortable stable and made the rounds on the local show circuit with a once-a-year weekend at HITS Ocala.
    "Facts are meaningless. You can use facts to prove anything
    that's even remotely true."

    Homer Simpson



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor'sOrders View Post
    FitToBeTied, that would work well if I weren't already 'saddled' with a horse, so to speak

    I'm in accounting now, first year and affording the horse is a stretch, but it's happening. I don't think accounting is where I want to spend my career though, so I'm interested in some other career paths. I don't expect to make six figures in 2 years or only work 30 hour weeks or anything like that. I'm ready to work long and hard, but I have to know that what I'm working towards is worth it, if that makes sense.

    What I'm interested in are careers where it is the rule, not the exception that in 3-5 years you are making a decent living and have the opportunity to work remotely or create your own schedule so riding time isn't terribly compromised.
    You can have a great flexible career in accounting. A friend did the big accounting thing, got her CPA and now has her own accounting/consulting practice and has had it for 25 years. She lives part time on her sailboat.

    I'll add to my earlier advice. Sell the horse you are saddled with. You are in your first year out of college and can't afford it. If you tell me you are paying all your bills without credit card debt and putting away 10% into savings/investments then I'll retract my comment to sell the horse. I've seen so many college graduates screw themselves financially by not doing any savings in pursuit of the fancy car, horse, etc.

    Even though you are an accountant you should understand the time value of money (friends joke: accountants know the cost of everything and the value of nothing). That 5k you spend this year on the horse would be worth approx 38,000 in 25 years if you invested it.
    A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    May. 28, 2002
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    It took me until I was in my 30's before I could afford to ride at the level I wanted to. You do have to "pay your dues" so to speak. Hard work never hurt anyone. I was able to show two horses on the AA circuit for a number of years. I had an understanding SO too. But I had no kids. I could NEVER have done what I did if I had kids - time and money. You have to pick and chose your priorities.


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  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
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    Sure to get kicked out of the Bible Belt soon.....
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    Marry rich.

    Being serious- what type of "equestrian lifestyle" do you desire?
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
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    6,456

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    I'm a software consultant.

    Work full time from home with flexible hours.

    Have one horse on full board with lessons twice weekly.

    Have a young horse not quite ready for prime time boarded out west.

    Plenty of money left over for shows/clinics/etc. Own a modest home and drive a modest Honda. My truck is 15 years old.

    I'm married and my husband makes around what I do, but I fully support my horse and expenses on my own.
    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterPony
    you can shackle your pony to a lawn chair at the show...so long as its in a conservative color.



  15. #15
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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  16. #16
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    Sep. 11, 2011
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    It's not how much you make, its how you make choices and how many commitments you have.

    I set up things so I can ride every evening, work from home two days a week, and can go out directly after work. By changing where I work I saved 1-2 hrs commuting, and 150/dollars by not paying for parking and (more) fuel.

    I keep my (living) costs low so I can pay for a nice barn. I am very targeted with my weekly lessons, and show very strategically.

    Sure, you need a certain standard of income and education but after that people get sort of stuck with too many commitments that they can't ride.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2013
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    169

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    I'm an attorney still early in my career. I make a decent amount of money in an area with a low cost of living and am getting by. I had come into a bit of some unexpected money and that's how I ended up with the nice horse I have now. I could have invested it but at the time I chose to invest in my mental and emotional health and got the horse and don't regret it a bit.

    I have to pinch pennies to really do the horse thing the way I want to, like showing and taking lessons, although I am looking at a fairly rapid increase in my salary over the next 5 years so I know by the time I hit my 30s I'll be in a much better place to pay all the bills, including the horse ones, and be comfortable.



  18. #18
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    Mar. 8, 2016
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    Lots of options to think about and research here, thank you!
    FitToBeTied, maybe I'm thinking of throwing in the accounting towel too early. I'm not sure if I dislike the profession or just the company I'm with.

    I agree with the wisdom of selling the horse. As is though, it would be giving away at this point I think. We're working through some farrier issues, NQR soundness, etc. It's easy to see where a horse like this one (NQR at the moment, not a beginner, or even timid amateur horse, middle aged TB, hasn't had a proven career in 4 years) could end up in an ugly situation.

    I'm not doing terribly. Just not where I want to be. This is more a 'I can't afford monthly body work and massage' than 'I'm struggling to come up with board' issue.

    monalisa, I'm totally fine with paying my dues. Right now I feel like I'm paying my dues in the wrong profession though and if there is anything I HATE it is wasted time. I am worried I'll wake up in 3 years and realize I've gone no where and have to start over, again paying my dues in a new profession.

    Pennywell Bay, in my mind, I don't think the equestrian lifestyle I desire is over the top. I was lucky to have shown a ton as a junior and don't really want to live that life again. I like bringing the younger, green ones along and would be happy having one 'competition' horse and a green bean, or riding others green beans. However, I don't want to worry about vet bills. If it needs doing, I want to have it done, no crunching numbers to see if I can afford it or not then giving the OK like I'm doing now.



  19. #19
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    Mar. 8, 2016
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    For the lawyers out there, I've wanted to pursue being a lawyer since I was in elementary school, but I hear so much about how law school is a huge waste of money and we have a massive over saturation of lawyers. In fact, almost any career I've been interested in, I've been told they aren't lucrative enough to support horses (lawyer, vet, statistician, professor). As an insider in the legal field, is that really true or just something Business Insider and the like enjoy writing articles about?



  20. #20
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    Mar. 8, 2016
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    Also, where are you all finding these doctors and rich men to marry?? I live in LA, so surely it shouldn't be too difficult right? Hah



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