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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2007
    Posts
    3,159

    Default Barn footwear recommendations

    I'm looking for some footwear recommendations for day to day barn chores - stalls, trips to the manure pile - basic stuff.
    Currently wearing Ariat clogs, but they aren't providing the ankle support I need after last summer's express trip through the hay chute to land on my feet. I'd like something not horrificialy expensive, waterproof, and easy to taken on / put off (as in not requiring a boot pull). Would prefer something in the paddock boot height ideally.
    DOes such a beast exist?
    Thanks!
    De
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2012
    Location
    Coastal NC
    Posts
    1,015

    Default

    I wear "muck boots" a size larger than what I need. That way I can slip them on and off without having to pull. I have a bad ankle and leg with a rod and screws and these boots provide enough support for me.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Plainview, MN
    Posts
    3,578

    Default

    I buy Columbia brand hiking boots at Fleet Farm, but they are not waterproof. They cost about the same as the Ariat riding/hiking boots but seem to be made better.

    I also have Muck Boots, which are waterproof, but are too hot for me to wear except in the winter and do not offer as much foot and ankle support as hiking boots.

    I have worn expensive hiking boots as barn boots when i have found ones that fit on the clearance rack at REI.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    Dubarrys if you can invest - I cannot describe how much I am in love with these boots. I wore them walking all over Edinburgh (I lived ~2miles from my classes) when I was at uni, through a harsh winter and into the Spring. If I could have gotten away with wearing them in Paris, I so would've done. I just used thicker socks in the winter and thinner ones in warmer weather. Be warned though if you have a narrow calf - sizes run a bit wide. They are definitely waterproof too - I do take really good care of them though.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2005
    Posts
    1,218

    Default

    Blundstones! They will run you a bit up front, but they will last forever. I'm on like year 3-4 of mine and they are in great shape. I abuse them too, wear them in all weather (rain, snow, etc), bathing horses, mucking, riding, everything. I've never once cleaned them.

    Super comfy too. Last year I convinced my non-horsey SO to try some (I think men in Blundstones are very attractive, haha) and he loved them. He's also bought a 2nd pair of steel toed Blundstones for work, too.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,384

    Default

    Was looking for the exact same.... found a pair of Timberland hiking boots at the outlet store that are awesome. Super comfortably, waterproof, narrow enough for riding too. I can find the model name if you want.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,109

    Default

    I love Blundstones, but they are not waterproof and that drove me crazy. I have the Ariat Barnyard boots in the waterproof pull on version. I bought mine on sale for $65 so not bad if you can find a sale. I can pull mine off without a boot pull, but they are also just a little big on me (should have probably gone down a half size). And they are truly waterproof, which I love. I just hate wet feet!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 18, 2012
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Ariat just came out with a pull on paddock boot that is waterproof and has a rubber cap toe. The "Barnsley" is the name of the model, I believe.
    I have no idea how functional they are, but they sure look like they would fit the bill. The pull on aspect might be a problem for you, however.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2005
    Posts
    1,664

    Default

    Love my Blundstones but the rubber heel and sole are getting all chopped up and wondered if they are fixab le? I also like the Ariat barn boots-easy on and off and water proof.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2007
    Posts
    3,159

    Default

    Thanks for the great ideas!
    FG, whereabouts did you get yours (as in which outlet?) You and I live in the same neck of the woods in general, so it might be somewhere I can find easily. Was thinking of looking at Stagecoach, but not sure what they have. I'm not averse to wearing guys' boots because I have a pretty wide foot to boot.
    Thanks!
    Dee
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2008
    Location
    Central US
    Posts
    164

    Default

    They are expensive and don't shoot me for suggesting it, but a pair of Dubary boots will do the job. You can clean stalls, ride n them, walk all over the manure pile, hose them off and go to work (in a non barn world) and look good. I bought a pair last year. I do barn chores in them, rinse them off (they are leather), change my clothes into tight pants and a tunic and go to work and look as hot as I can look as a slightly over the hill 54 year old that I am can look. But MAN, I FEEL SMASHING IN THESE BOOTS. Worth. every. penny. And warm.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2008
    Location
    Central US
    Posts
    164

    Default

    Oh, and buy them at Equine Affaire and insist on getting the free champagne from the cute guy with the fake Irish accent....



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    Muck Boots -- the "Jobber" model is a short ankle height boot. You can replace the insoles if you need more arch support.

    They are $100 but I can't remember when I bought mine and they are still going strong. I got a matching pair of the tall boots this year. ("Tack" I think they're called.)
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2012
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    383

    Default Check out Red Wing boots

    In the non-horse world, Red Wing shoes are often considered among the best working boots. I would definitely look into them.

    Women's work boots: http://www.redwingshoes.com/footwear...age-1/maxnum-0

    I'm surprised anyone would recommend Muck boots for someone wanting ankle support as it's the reason I can't wear mine for extended periods of time. But I imagine they don't fit everyone the same way they fit me.
    Last edited by Twisted River; Sep. 19, 2012 at 11:44 PM.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2006
    Location
    Grand Junction, CO
    Posts
    1,776

    Default

    Personally, I wouldn't want to wear work boots to do barn chores. Real steal toes are SO heavy, and are freezing in winter. I have a pair of Double-H boots that are for all intents and purposes, paddock boots. The strange toe fringe is removable. They have held up SO well. They are three years old and the leather looks great. Because they are lace-up, they offer plenty of ankle support. And they weren't so expensive that I'm worried about ruining them.

    http://www.doublehboots.com/womens-c...n.asp?catid=66



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DeeThbd View Post
    Thanks for the great ideas!
    FG, whereabouts did you get yours (as in which outlet?) You and I live in the same neck of the woods in general, so it might be somewhere I can find easily. Was thinking of looking at Stagecoach, but not sure what they have. I'm not averse to wearing guys' boots because I have a pretty wide foot to boot.
    Thanks!
    Dee
    It is actually a man's boot. And I misremembered.. lol... I found it at DSW, not the Niagara Outlets. It is super comfy and seems really durable so far. It was on sale for around $50.

    I got tired of trying "horsey" brands (for well over $100) only to have them fall apart on me way too quick! The brands made for hiking/outdoor stuff are so much more durable IMO.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2012
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    383

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mayhew View Post
    Personally, I wouldn't want to wear work boots to do barn chores. Real steal toes are SO heavy, and are freezing in winter.
    I don't personally associate all "work boots" as having steel toes and being 5 lbs of heavy shoe. I define them as any shoe designed to be walked and stood in for 40 hours a week.

    I can't even begin to think of every single job that entails being on your feet for most to all of the time... But if paddock boots are the most comfortable, supportive, durable, best value shoes out there then everyone would wear them. My main point is just that I think you limit yourself greatly by only considering "equestrian" boots.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2012
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    383

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FlashGordon View Post

    I got tired of trying "horsey" brands (for well over $100) only to have them fall apart on me way too quick! The brands made for hiking/outdoor stuff are so much more durable IMO.
    AGREE!!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2006
    Location
    Grand Junction, CO
    Posts
    1,776

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Twisted River View Post
    I don't personally associate all "work boots" as having steel toes and being 5 lbs of heavy shoe. I define them as any shoe designed to be walked and stood in for 40 hours a week.
    I see. I guess I do associate them because the only job I've had that defined what sort of footwear we could have required safety boots. I was doing a sugar bush program at a conservation area and my toes FROZE.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2005
    Location
    Ojai, CA
    Posts
    1,085

    Default

    Not paddock boot height but I swear by Merrell mocs. The leather ones. Summer, winter, light rain (if it's pouring I grab real rubber boots). They look good (I keep other pairs in the closet for non-horse activities) with jeans and even with shorts. I wear them 365 days a year and can get two years (at least) out of a pair. For $100 (approx), that's not bad. And they're sturdy enough that if a horse should step on you, there's some protection. Much more so than paddock boots, for example. Since they're slip-ons, they're great to leave by the back door. LOVE THEM.
    R.I.P. Ollie (2007-2010) You were small in stature but huge in spirit. You will never be forgotten.

    Godspeed, Benjamin (1998-2014). A life well-lived. A horse well-loved.



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