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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
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    Earlysville, Virginia
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    3,278

    Default Are bees attracted to bot eggs?

    Today, I went to catch my mare from the field. Noticed she had a large, cripsy, smooshed bug stuck on the inside of her leg, right where the bot eggs are (were). I also noticed there was a bee that would NOT leave the area around her legs. Just hovered there.

    Bee followed and stayed by her legs for the whole walk to the barn, and stayed back there while I was taking care of the horses. The bee seemed very attracted to the area on her legs that had bot eggs, but would also hover over other areas occasionally(always her legs though).

    It looked like a sweat bee, but fatter, and his body looked curved, like he was aiming his stinger, but he never did. I finally grew a pair and fly sprayed the heck out of him. He left for a few minutes then CAME BACK. He was seriously determined. I ended up removing the bot eggs, fly spraying well, and applying some swat.

    Considering I had a BAD reaction last time I was stung, I wasn't going to go after the bee. I'm home alone for a month while SO is out of town, and no one would have found my bee stung body for days.

    So are bees attracted to bot eggs?! It was so strange.

    ETA: Mare also had large and small hives on her stomach, which made me think that she had been stung earlier today.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    13,169

    Default

    I suspect what you thought was a bee was an adult botfly.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 12, 2004
    Location
    No. VA
    Posts
    683

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    I suspect what you thought was a bee was an adult botfly.
    I too think that to be the case!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
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    Default

    OH MY GOSH, EW.

    I don't know why i'm so grossed out, but I have NEVER seen an adult bot fly.

    Now to google....
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,546

    Default

    Yep....they are cleverly disguised as bee's. A bot in bee's clothing .



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    4,164

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hundredacres View Post
    Yep....they are cleverly disguised as bee's. A bot in bee's clothing .


    I remember seeing those all the time in the early 70's and the little yellow eggs on the horses legs.

    I wonder if due to today's meds is why I haven't seen them since then.
    "Don't saw on your horses mouth it's not a piece of wood" ~ GM



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    16,260

    Default

    It was probably an adult bot laying eggs - they do look alike and it bothers the horses while they buzz around. We have had barely any bots since the use of ivermectin became standard -- maybe with fecals instead of regular worming they will return ?
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    6,650

    Default

    We have bots here, but I think the cattle ranch next door might have something to do with it. Never noticed bots very often until we had neighbors that moo'ed.
    APPSOLUTE CHOCKLATE - Photo by Kathy Colman



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    It was probably an adult bot laying eggs - they do look alike and it bothers the horses while they buzz around. We have had barely any bots since the use of ivermectin became standard -- maybe with fecals instead of regular worming they will return ?
    We do fecals, and generally twice yearly worming (dependant on the fecal) and use Equimax and Quest Plus. Is this adequate?

    The horses are on 150 ish acres, and I thought that might decrease the chance for worms, but I can always learn something!
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    269

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AliCat518 View Post
    Today, I went to catch my mare from the field. Noticed she had a large, cripsy, smooshed bug stuck on the inside of her leg, right where the bot eggs are (were). I also noticed there was a bee that would NOT leave the area around her legs. Just hovered there.

    Bee followed and stayed by her legs for the whole walk to the barn, and stayed back there while I was taking care of the horses. The bee seemed very attracted to the area on her legs that had bot eggs, but would also hover over other areas occasionally(always her legs though).

    It looked like a sweat bee, but fatter, and his body looked curved, like he was aiming his stinger, but he never did. I finally grew a pair and fly sprayed the heck out of him. He left for a few minutes then CAME BACK. He was seriously determined. I ended up removing the bot eggs, fly spraying well, and applying some swat.

    Considering I had a BAD reaction last time I was stung, I wasn't going to go after the bee. I'm home alone for a month while SO is out of town, and no one would have found my bee stung body for days.

    So are bees attracted to bot eggs?! It was so strange.

    ETA: Mare also had large and small hives on her stomach, which made me think that she had been stung earlier today.
    I know that some bees (yellow jackets) are attracted to proud flesh - did she have any wounds? I've seen them INSIDE of open oozy wounds before. But adult bot flys can look like a bee too... like a muted/fuzzy bumble (and I think there are lots of kinds so possibly look like other bees as well - those are the only kind I've personally seen).
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,347

    Default

    Wow! I learned something really interesting here LOL.

    I googled "botfly" because I too have never seen one, and learned that cuterebra are a variety of botfly. NEAT!!!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
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    3,278

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Judysmom View Post
    Wow! I learned something really interesting here LOL.

    I googled "botfly" because I too have never seen one, and learned that cuterebra are a variety of botfly. NEAT!!!

    Oh goodness, now I had to google cuterebra, and i'm grossed out again.

    I'm surprised that im so disgusted by these things. But EW. Those eggs turn into BEE LOOKIN THINGS? bleh. no thank you. I will kill them from now on.


    Im so surprised ive never seen one before.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    6,077

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AliCat518 View Post
    Oh goodness, now I had to google cuterebra, and i'm grossed out again.

    I'm surprised that im so disgusted by these things. But EW. Those eggs turn into BEE LOOKIN THINGS? bleh. no thank you. I will kill them from now on.


    Im so surprised ive never seen one before.
    Those eggs are ingested and develop to third stage larve that then attach near the margo plicatus in the stomach. They will eventually get pooped out pupate and turn into an adult. Ivermectin products take care of them.

    So if you see eggs, take them off your horse if you don't already.
    I love cats, I love every single cat....
    So anyway I am a cat lover
    And I love to run.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    9,003

    Default

    I saw a bot fly two years ago for the first time in ages. I got all nostalgic about it before I swatted it. I remember scraping all those eggs off every week before showmanship class......

    Ever since my grandfather's dairy herd was sold, I haven't seen a green headed horse fly either. The fly population sure has changed around here.
    Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you're stupid and you made a bad decision.



  15. #15
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    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
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    Default

    I definitely scrape them off. They've just shown up in the past day or two. I will be checking religiously now, and killing any of the adults. Yuck. Give me a horse fly any day.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Saw my first bot eggs in SIX YEARS the other day. Dammit! I'm so hoping that the horse brought them home with him from the other barn, because in scraping them off immediately I really hope I can continue to forget that they exist.
    Click here before you buy.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
    Posts
    5,840

    Default

    Same here DW. Did a doubletake when I saw them the other day. Bring on the ivermectin...



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
    Location
    Ontario
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    8,850

    Default

    We have them too, but not as many as other years. I scrape them.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    591

    Default

    Check for the eggs regularly and scrape them off as soon as you see them because ...

    When the horse rubs/licks his legs, the eggs get into his mouth and hatch and BURROW INTO THE HORSE'S TONGUE! They live there for three weeks then emerge and get swallowed. In the GI tract, they attach themselves to the lining of the wall (many gross pictures on google e.g. this one) and live there for ten or so months.

    Then they drop off, get poo-ed out and burrow into the ground and form a pupae. After a month or so a bot fly hatches out and flys around looking for a horse to lay eggs on.

    I reckon they have the coolest/grossest life cycle of all the internal parasites. It's the tongue thing that does it for me.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
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    Default

    ughhhh I knew better than to click that link while eating my peach. Bleh.

    So does Quest Plus take care of bots? Or do I need Ivermectin? I just did Quest on Sept 1.

    I scraped off eggs yesterday and will be looking again today. Hope that adult bot is gone.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



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