The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2005
    Posts
    1,591

    Default

    At a small schooling show a guy had a stallion standing in an out of the way corner and the horse was very well behaved, but the guy kept calling out "this si a stallion, stand back, he is a stallion"! Yawn, how boring that you are impressed that you have a stallion at the end of your reins!
    Stallion owners are the ones who are responsible for the behavior of their horse and if they or the horse can't handle the pressure of a show they shouldn't be there. I am not a big fan of stallions feeling that many are better off as geldings but I admire a well trained and handled one.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    10,995

    Default

    I show a mare and my friend I travel with shows a stallion. We always purchase a tack stall to put between the mare and the stallion and he needs an end stall with a solid back because he will be a giant pain in the ass in his stall if there is a mare behind him. I suspect this is mostly him as her last stallion could be tied at a trailer next to a mare and wouldn't make a peep. On the end of a lead rope or under saddle you'd never know.

    We only had an issue once, even after marking the "stallion" box on entries he was stabled in the middle of a set of stalls with open wire and a mare behind him. To make matters worse the mare thought he would be a suitable father for her babies so he stayed tied until we could move.

    The only issue about showing a stallion is the worry of falling off and having him loose!
    Last edited by enjoytheride; Sep. 19, 2012 at 04:37 PM.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2008
    Location
    Half past the point of oblivion
    Posts
    924

    Default

    One great advantage to breed shows is that generally those stallions have been showing since they were weanlings; they never get the idea that they are special or that any type of misbehavior is acceptable because they are stallions. Some of the pearl-clutching that goes on at other shows, oh my.

    Great advice all around here. Be smart about stabling when it comes time for that, be aware for subtle changes in his behavior so you can redirect his attention before he gets excited, and never ignore or excuse anything that you would correct in a gelding.

    Have fun and god luck
    Holy crap, how does Darwin keep missing you? ~Lauruffian



  4. #24
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
    Posts
    1,719

    Default

    My guy's a gelding at this point, but was intact the first year I had him. We did all kinds of schooling shows and clinics. I always made sure the clinician was okay with a green stallion being in the group, promising to excuse myself if he started acting like a fool. None had a problem with it. I expected impeccable manners regardless of what was going on around him. I held him to a higher standard BECAUSE he was a stallion. I expected him to walk calmly through a crowd. I never took him anywhere he needed to be stabled (always just did local one day stuff), but it wouldn't have been an issue.

    His stall at home was in the middle of the barn. He had a gelding next to him and two mares behind him. That's just how the stall openings worked out when we moved in. His field was next to the mares field. He just learned to get over himself. The only real concession I made for his stallion-ness at home was I had a sign on his door asking people not to hand feed him treats because he was mouthy. If they wanted to give him an apple or cookie to please just put it in his feed bin (we had sane, reasonable boarders who wouldn't feed anything inappropriate).

    One memorable clinic, we were standing around the clinician in a horseshoe holding our horses getting instructions for the next exercise (am session was ground work, pm was mounted versions of the ground work). My guy was dozing with a leg cocked and his nose resting against my arm. The mare in heat next to us was losing her marbles and the mare owner was *really mad* the clinician asked her to leave the arena to reinstall the mare's brain. She kept insisting it was my stallion's fault. Really? The one taking a nap here while your mare dances around screaming and peeing at him?

    In any event, when out, I expect the stallion owner to have their horse under control, same as if it was a mare or gelding. Being a stallion isn't an excuse for poor behavior. I expect the traditional yellow ribbon in the tail. Beyond that, I expect the stallion to have manners and to behave like any other horse out there.

    If I am handling/riding a mare in heat and I *know* that X horse is a stallion. I'll stay out of their way as much as possible as a courtesy, but I expect both of the horses to mind their manners and stick to their jobs.

    Then again, I come from the Arab and stock horse worlds where stallions are normal and everyone just expects them to behave and do their jobs.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2011
    Posts
    81

    Default

    I campaigned a stallion for many years. Not the kind you would mistake for a gelding. If he wasn't 100 percent focused and well behaved under saddle and in hand I'd have gelded in a heart beat. Being an all boy type we did accommodate him in the stable, end stall, tack stall and portable electric wire came out if he took a dislike or too much of an interest in adjacent horses. That said, it became necessary to geld late in life and former stud muffin is much happier now that he can enjoy the company of his own kind without the hormonal issues.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2008
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    242

    Default

    I haven't shown with many stallions (or if I have, I haven't noticed - my mares are well behaved and I have never noticed a horse that was "obviously" acting like a stallion - this is how it should be!), but I routinely clinic with one. The first time his owner joined the clinics, my very young, green mare was just coming into season and was well behaved but understandably nervous when the stallion's rider allowed him to follow her very closely (although he didn't make any overt moves towards us). I asked her to give my mare a little more space. After that, we never had a problem and I have ridden with this stallion on other mares, or watched him in other groups and at recognized events, and there has never been an issue and you would typically have no idea he is an active, breeding stallion!

    So, I would suggest giving other horses a wider berth that you might with a mare or gelding, especially at a schooling show with other young, green, possibly in season horses (to make life easier for both you and them). Other than that, I wouldn't expect an announcement unless the horse got loose, but a ribbon in the tail might be a nice gesture (although most people probably wouldn't know what it meant...but they might ask and provide you with an educational opportunity!).

    Good luck and have fun with your boy!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2007
    Posts
    159

    Default

    I rode and showed a stallion for the first time a few years ago. He was an older gentleman and had been impeccably trained to behave himself. The only precautions we took were to check in with whoever was stabled on the other side of our barn and let them know which stall the stallion was in. I tried to make sure he was opposite a gelding rather than a mare (which the other competitors appreciated.)

    The other thing I had to watch quite carefully for was other riders allowing their horses to get too close while I was standing and waiting outside the ring. I would always try to find a shady spot where we had a decent amount of room away from other horses. Often other competitors would come up and stand right next to us (which was ok). What wasn't ok was when they would stop paying attention to their horse allow them to sniff noses with mine. He was pretty well behaved, but if that was allowed to continue it would push him over the edge to snorting or getting a little upset. I don't appreciate it when people do that when I'm on a gelding, but I felt that it was a bit too much to ask of a stallion.

    So... whenever people came up to stand beside me I would quietly and politely inform them that this horse was a very well-behaved stallion. That usually gave them enough notice that they remained a little more aware of what their horse was doing.


    We often showed at a facility that was also a breeding farm. I only had one time where he was in "stallion mode" for some reason. I let my trainer warm him up that day and get his mind back on the job at hand.

    Other than that, I found that showing a stallion was just like showing any other horse. Stay aware and know what he needs to stay comfortable.

    Oh... an no need for a show-wide announcement... unless he's running loose through the property. If you do your job right, no one should know he's a stallion



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2004
    Location
    The Redneck Riviera
    Posts
    3,844

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dazednconfused View Post
    Are you guys really that princessy about stallions at shows? REALLY? I can't help but laugh, admittedly. I now manage a jumper/eventer farm, but before that did Arabs, and I would say a quarter of the horses shown at the average arab show are stallions (too many, probably, but that's a discussion for another day), and none of them wore yellow ribbons, had Vicks on their noses, or required an announcement.

    The onus is on the rider/handler of the stallion to make him behave, and you really shouldn't know he is a stallion unless you look. If he is doing anything that could potentially harm someone else, he doesn't belong at a show and needs to be better socialized.

    I do agree some stalls will need some better reinforcement, and better planning for the safety and peace and quiet with regards to where you put him (and you may have to talk to show management about that with your entries, or your neighbors if you can't get a stall against a wall or corner stall.)
    This! I don't ride my stallion, but I do handle him at shows (grazing, hosing off, hand walking etc), and my trainer rides him at Events, schooling jumper shows, and dressage shows. In fact he rides several stallions at all of the above.

    We (myself and the trainer) really expect the boys to be behaved. yes, you do have to be more aware that you have a stallion at the end of the line, and don't purposefully put yourself in a dangerous situation, but otherwise I treat my stallion the same way I treat all of my horses. He is walked around the show grounds in a halter and regular lead (no chain), he is ridden in the warm up and stands quietly at the in gate - even around mares. If he can't behave then he has no business out and about.

    I can always tell the stallions that have not been socialized well - they are the ones that are not very well behaved at shows (and generally at home too). At home (and at shows) the boys are typically stalled next to one another (even in the tents), although we do ask to be away from mares of course. And at home the stalls have bars between so they can touch noses and be horses.

    When managed well, stallions are not generally fire breathing dragons.
    Emerald Acres standing the ATA Approved Stallion, Tatendrang. Visit us at our Facebook Farm Page as well!



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2011
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ccoronios View Post
    Dazed - LOL -



    And I've never really seen outrageous behavior as the norm at tracks, either, where colts and fillies cohabitate, as it were.


    Carol
    Really?! I certainly have, lol



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2008
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    542

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WombatCA View Post
    The other thing I had to watch quite carefully for was other riders allowing their horses to get too close while I was standing and waiting outside the ring. I would always try to find a shady spot where we had a decent amount of room away from other horses. Often other competitors would come up and stand right next to us (which was ok). What wasn't ok was when they would stop paying attention to their horse allow them to sniff noses with mine. He was pretty well behaved, but if that was allowed to continue it would push him over the edge to snorting or getting a little upset. I don't appreciate it when people do that when I'm on a gelding, but I felt that it was a bit too much to ask of a stallion.

    So... whenever people came up to stand beside me I would quietly and politely inform them that this horse was a very well-behaved stallion. That usually gave them enough notice that they remained a little more aware of what their horse was doing.
    Along similar lines - when showing my stallion, I would always make sure that I had a second set of hands at the wash rack. Sometimes I would have to politely let those next to me know that he was indeed a stallion, but that was usually to the individual that had casually thrown the lead over the neck while scrubbing the hind legs
    Alison/Mikali Farms
    www.mikalifarms.com



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
    Posts
    2,911

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crown Royal View Post
    I also just didn't know if mare riders prefer to know that a stallion will be close by at a schooling show venue, mostly because there are a lot of green horses and green riders. I certainly agree that stallions should always behave just as mannerly, or more, than geldings and should know the difference between breeding time and riding time.
    What I would prefer, and really is ideal, is a stallion that does not live in an isolated situation at home. If the stallion has a 'bachelor band,' other males/geldings, that he goes out with, (and, whoa nelly, there's nothing like preggo mare to teach 'em how to behave!!), then the show atmosphere should be no more trying just because the horse is a stallion.

    It is not 'stallion' that is the issue. It is isolation.

    Keeping the animal in a lifestyle that allows him no contact with other horses, then trying to cope with his lack of socialization +hormones+ stimulating venue.

    Ideally, do not isolate the horse and then take him someplace where his lack of general social stimulation could cause a huge problem for other people.



Similar Threads

  1. Junior Rider Showing Stallion
    By piaffequeen in forum Dressage
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Apr. 19, 2012, 12:08 PM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: May. 20, 2010, 02:57 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: Apr. 16, 2010, 10:04 PM
  4. Tips for showing a stallion on the line
    By Bravestrom in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Aug. 29, 2009, 09:56 AM
  5. Replies: 56
    Last Post: Dec. 1, 2008, 12:23 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness