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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2005
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    488

    Default indoor riding arena question

    what is a good medium sized indoor riding arena? after im done with college in 3 months and get my career on the way im going to be putting up a horse barn with an apartment in the loft and an indoor arena.

    But I dont know what size of an arena, I have rode in many different ones but they have all been really really big and probably out of my budget or really small. What would be a good medium sized arena that a couple people could ride in at the same time, enough room to ride ground poles and do a little jumping? thanks for any help or suggestions
    ride like you have never ate the dirt



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2012
    Posts
    29

    Default Indoor Arena size

    I am also in the midwest, and I hope to put up an indoor arena in the next few years. I've been paying more attention to arena sizes that I ride in. I think you'd want to go with a width between 66'-72' and a length of 132'-156'. This would give you enough room for multiple people to be in the indoor at the same time and you can definitely do some jumping.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2011
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    83

    Default

    I'm putting up an indoor this fall and after a lot of research i decided to go with 70 x 150.... 60 x 120 is small and i've seen people make it work but if you want multiple people and jumping it'd be worth it in the long run to make it a little wider and longer. At the end of the day the price difference isn't that big compared to the extra space you'd be getting!! You can always make an indoor longer later down the road but not wider. Good luck!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
    Location
    Gum Tree PA
    Posts
    2,144

    Default

    Our out side ring is 90 X 200 and that feels a bit short and tight with several horses at the same time. As LeapOfFaith said it does not cost that much more to go bigger especially longer. However once you go over 80’ wide the cost does go up quite a bit.

    I posted a detail price quote for an 80X200 that I got last spring for this area of PA. A search should bring you to it if interested



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
    Posts
    7,752

    Default

    Mine is 76x135 and has been ample for several riders/horses (including some BIG guys..), dressage clinics, etc. Built it in 1993 (Morton) It is 17' high.

    It was originally going to be 150' long, but I couldn't justify how much more it would cost for an extra 15'.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    25,023

    Default

    Do a LOT of shopping and price quotes for all types of indoor buildings.

    Size, width, materials, roof type, amount of windows/doors, types of windows and doors, topography of site, site prep, drainage, grading, utilities and location in the USA all can have a really significant impact on cost. As will time.

    Large indoor building shopping is almost a full time job, LOL! I had them priced out here (CT) about 8-9 years ago. Very basic site prep, delivery, materials and construction ranged between $85k to $125k. However there are very few places in CT where you only need "basic site prep" and the added site prep for us would have almost doubled the cost of the building.

    And now less than a decade later and the price of steel and fuel being HUGELY higher...has put an indoor price up there with beach house in The Hamptons.

    So do a LOT of shopping and drive to area barns that have them and ask for info, contractors, if they like/dislike theirs, etc. I found doing that here invaluable. And pretty much everyone liked showing off their indoors and chatting about them.

    Of course everything here in coastal New England is overpriced and overtaxed. May be better costs where ever you are. Because even a covered 60' round pen here starts around $60k and goes up from there.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
    Posts
    2,673

    Default

    Around 70 x 140 is the nice medium size. Size wise, width is the thing that will drive the cost up fast. You can add length much cheaper
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,374

    Default

    We have a tiny indoor & it really is a pain. It gets crowded with just a few horses & trying to do a dressage test is kind of ridiculous with a big horse.

    I would suggest getting the biggest size you can afford, b/c you will be living with what you get for a long time.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
    Posts
    7,752

    Default

    Ditto. I had settled on 76' wide so I never knew what it could cost to make wider. Adding 15' in length, though, astounded me at the extra cost. So I stuck with 135 and have been very happy even in a commercial schooling operation.

    Definitely shop around and visit others' indoors...but never, ever cut on the quality of the materials or construction (also find out about "snow load" specs). You want the thing to be standing 30 years from now..

    But luck and happy shopping!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hippolyta View Post
    We have a tiny indoor & it really is a pain. It gets crowded with just a few horses & trying to do a dressage test is kind of ridiculous with a big horse.
    When you say tiny how tiny is it??

    I am lucky enough to be looking at the possibility of having a covered riding area put on the farm here, all for little me, well I will have to share with farm machinery some of the time, but I'm wondering how much space I need to claim as 100% mine, just an individual rider doing flat work, but have a 17hh horse
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2011
    Posts
    334

    Default

    A barn I boarded at had a 120' long x 80'? wide arena that had a storage area set up at the end--so it was likely only 110' usable length. They manged to jump a 2-jump line in there. First barn I ever boarded at, we figured the indoor was 50x100. It didn't seem too small, though there were never more than 3 horses in there at once. I'd thought I could deal with 50x90 if I couldn't afford to go any bigger once I got my own place.
    Then I got into dressage...so 60' wide is definitely minimum now, and 70-72' would be sweet. Things like doing leg yields also make a longer arena desirable. You have to decide for yourself, is the indoor only for the worst weather or is it where you will ride most of the time? Are you fine jumping a few jumps in the center of the ring, or do you want to be able to set a triple combination? I think my I-haven't-won-the-lottery-yet "dream" arena would be 72x160. (Post-lottery win, I think that would go to 80x200, maybe.) I'm sure I could live with a 60x120 too, though--just having my own place would be awesome!

    Speaking of tiny, I have seen real estate ads for properties with 36x100 and 50x50 indoor arenas.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2003
    Location
    Brentwood, NH
    Posts
    1,083

    Default

    36x100 would probably be for saddleseat. They only ride on a straight line, as far as I can tell. I went to farrier school down south, and many barns just had a wide aisle that they rode in, straight up and down the aisle. If you want to do dressage you want 70 feet wide minimum. I like 70 by 160 as the smallest for a decent course of fences. That was the size of my indoor years ago and we could run combined tests in it, a small dressage arena and a course of stadium fences after. We even left room at one end for spectators.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2003
    Location
    Brentwood, NH
    Posts
    1,083

    Default

    36x100 would probably be for saddleseat. They only ride on a straight line, as far as I can tell. I went to farrier school down south, and many barns just had a wide aisle that they rode in, straight up and down the aisle. If you want to do dressage you want 70 feet wide minimum. I like 70 by 160 as the smallest for a decent course of fences. That was the size of my indoor years ago and we could run combined tests in it, a small dressage arena and a course of stadium fences after. We even left room at one end for spectators.



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