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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2011
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    Island of Heart Surrounded by the Sea of Intuition
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    Default Shoes? Why?

    ok so I am not a farrier or expert in horses hooves by an means, I am not a barefoot only type either. But I am currently horse shopping and seems all the horses I have looked at have shoes.

    When I bought my horse (OTTB) he had shoes on all 4 feet and at his 1st farrier appointment I was prepared to pay for shoes and the farrier decided it would be best to leave them off and see how it went! Well I left them off and the 8 months I had him at that farm he was great with no shoes (although we did not do much jumping maybe 4-5 cross rails once or twice a week)

    I moved him to a new barn and his front feet started to chip so we put shoes on the front to help with that issue. I was doing a little more jumping (just 2ft stuff still only 2-3 times a week)

    My trainer mentioned putting back shoes on see if it would help with lead changes but I never really saw the need to worry about flying changes with what I was doing so I never put back shoes on.

    Soooooo why do we put shoes on horses? Was it originally to protect the feet from chipping on harder surfaces? Seems like the farm I am at now immediately puts shoes on the horses when they come in. Does it really help with jumping, balance, flying changes?

    For instance a 4yr old TB came in with ok feet ( a little soft from standing in mud where he was before but no chipping or cracks) Horse is in very light work. Ridden maybe 2-3 times a week, working on straightness, bending, barely any jumping. Originally had only fronts on but within a month put all fours on and not he has to wear bell boots b/c he moves differently and may clip himsel


    Please don't make this into a PRO or CON Barefoot discussion!!!
    The Love for a Horse is just as Complicated as the Love for another Human being, If you have never Loved a Horse you will Never Understand!!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy4aOTTB View Post

    Please don't make this into a PRO or CON Barefoot discussion!!!

    But that is what it is.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
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    20,405

    Default

    Because Parelli said that was the best way to rollkur your horse before you send it to slaughter. That should cover it!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 3, 2012
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    60

    Default

    For me, it's all about protection. Where we run our cattle is VERY rocky - very sharp, very abrasive lava rocks. They'll peel the hoof right off a horse if that horse doesn't have shoes - even the mustang, and she's got about the best feet I've ever seen on a horse. If we're gathering and a bunch-quitter heads for the trees, I've got to be able to take off after it without worrying that my horse is going to shred his feet in the process.

    That being said, I'm definitely a fan of barefoot horses, if being barefoot is right for that horse. Not every horse is barefoot capable, unfortunately. Genetics and what the horse is used for play a HUGE part.
    Life is short. Ride your best horse first.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2011
    Location
    Southern WI
    Posts
    311

    Default

    Everything depends on what the horse needs at that time in their life and what the footing demands. It should never be a blanket "all horses need to be bare" or "all horses need to wear X shoes". Most of my horses are barefoot. One wears natural balance shoes + 2 degree wedge + frog support pad because of her CHPS. One of my mom's horses wore shoes because the footing she was riding him on caused his hooves to wear to the point they became almost deformed. My trail horse is barefoot, but should the need arise I would not hesitate to shoe him if that is what he needed for the terrain. Shoes can help with traction, and give a horse some more confidence to do more advanced maneuvers, but I've not heard it help with something as specific as flying changes, unless the problem was too little traction or a specific instability in the limb.

    Also, if a horse had no problems interfering, but now is, it sounds like there is something amiss in that horse's shoeing.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2012
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    1,961

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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Because Parelli said that was the best way to rollkur your horse before you send it to slaughter. That should cover it!
    ROFL!!!! You evil, girl!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,447

    Default

    3 reasons for shoes -

    1. Traction
    2. Wear Protection
    3. Therapeutic



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Posts
    1,152

    Default

    Mine has been barefoot, had fronts only, had hinds only and has had all 4 at various times in his life.

    But to answer your question, yes! I think there are barns that just slap shoes on everything that comes through the door with little regard to whether or not the horse needs them. I've been pressured to have mine shod when he was barefoot and certainly didn't need shoes given his hoof condition and work.

    Can't tell you why. Maybe the farrier gives them a kickback.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
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    1,191

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    3 reasons for shoes -

    1. Traction
    2. Wear Protection
    3. Therapeutic
    This is why mine end up shod - although, usually its traction, therapeutic and then wear protection - given that mine rarely work on a sand arena and I have grass paddocks and verges for riding.

    I start young horses under saddle and in harness barefoot. They stay that way until they need shoes because they are footsore on stones / roads or, usually because they need the extra traction towards the end of their first season competing.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2006
    Location
    B.C. Canada
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    Default

    I'm pretty sure you answered your own question when you said..
    My horses feet started chipping so I put shoes on him..

    Well there ya go.

    If your horse needs shoes, put em on dammit!

    ** this message is brought to you by the letter A , a person who has all barefoot horses! and the number 8.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California
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    4,684

    Default

    My horse was barefoot for 2 years, then needed shoes for a couple of years and is now successfully eventing barefoot at Novice and Training.

    I'm not pro or anti anything hoof wise, I think it all depends on what the horse needs.

    Personally, I think a lot of casual riders shoe when they don't need to, but it's usually because when they bought the horse it had shoes so they think it's the way to go. It's up to the owner to suggest no shoes, I don't think most farriers will if they can get away with it. Barefoot trims cost me $60, full shoes had me paying $180. My farrier believes barefoot is best, but I was the one who wanted to pull shoes, not him, but considering this is how he makes his living, I don't blame him!
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2008
    Location
    Delaware Valley
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    Default

    Why shoes? Because every horse is different, and every horse deserves to be pain free and move at its best, whether what's with four shoes, two shoes, glue-on shoes, barefoot, or whatever I've done just about everything. My older horse is barefoot. In the past she's had just fronts at times and hinds also at other times. My youngster has front shoes and will get hind shoes when/if she needs them. I've never been at a barn that just "slaps" on shoes on every horse.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    36,321

    Default

    Same reason I put shoes on *my* feet when necessary: it's easier to ambulate, my feet hurt less, I'm not as likely to injure my feet, and they help me to do what I need to do. And when the conditions are right I take them OFF.

    Rocket science it ain't, but it sure does get to resembling religion sometimes. Shoot, you can even get arguments from some dogmatics that HUMANS shouldn't wear shoes. I figure whatever floats one's individual boat is fine, but using shoes when they seem necessary and not using them when they don't sure seems logical to me.
    Click here before you buy.



  14. #14
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    Feb. 8, 2008
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    Delaware Valley
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Shoot, you can even get arguments from some dogmatics that HUMANS shouldn't wear shoes.
    I run, and lately I've been hearing I'm a bad runner because I don't wear minimalist running shoes



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
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    Default

    When I said many barns slap shoes on everything, I'm talking about show barns. Probably should have added that in my original comment. I've boarded at a pleasure barn and they could have cared less about whether or not my horse had shoes. Moved him to a show barn (and then another) and all of a sudden, he needed shoes.

    Mine has only worn shoes for therapeutic reasons or for traction showing on grass.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2009
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    1,999

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BensMama View Post
    For me, it's all about protection. Where we run our cattle is VERY rocky - very sharp, very abrasive lava rocks. They'll peel the hoof right off a horse if that horse doesn't have shoes - even the mustang, and she's got about the best feet I've ever seen on a horse. If we're gathering and a bunch-quitter heads for the trees, I've got to be able to take off after it without worrying that my horse is going to shred his feet in the process.

    That being said, I'm definitely a fan of barefoot horses, if being barefoot is right for that horse. Not every horse is barefoot capable, unfortunately. Genetics and what the horse is used for play a HUGE part.
    What type of shoes do you use? Pads?

    The rocks we have in east TN are generally large (certainly taller than a horse shoe) and sharp, so I don't understand how a standard horse shoe would protect anything but hoof wall.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2011
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    Island of Heart Surrounded by the Sea of Intuition
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    Default

    [QUOTE]3 reasons for shoes -

    1. Traction
    2. Wear Protection
    3. Therapeutic/QUOTE]

    I think this is exactly what I was looking for!
    The Love for a Horse is just as Complicated as the Love for another Human being, If you have never Loved a Horse you will Never Understand!!!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    9,459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katyb View Post
    What type of shoes do you use? Pads?

    The rocks we have in east TN are generally large (certainly taller than a horse shoe) and sharp, so I don't understand how a standard horse shoe would protect anything but hoof wall.
    True enough, but protection of the hoof wall IS a Very Good Idea.

    Adding traction, so that "slipping" is reduced, is also a Good Thing.

    But, the end of the day, the horse will tell you if shoes are a good idea or not. I've got two right now that are shod at all times, including foaling and lactating. Most of the rest are shod at least partially when in work. But a couple are not. I pay attention to the horse and then do what's appropriate.

    As for the OP,

    Fee, Fi, Fo, Foal
    I smell the stench of the slithy Troll
    And the fate of Trolls, as we all know
    Is when we all shout loudly, together, GO!!!!!!!

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    24,669

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    Exactly what Tom Bloomer said.

    Shoes vs barefoot never ever needs to be a hugely contentious subject. The decision is determined on a horse by horse basis and adding in the demands on each animals' feet.

    I've had barefoot, shod front only, shod all around and shod on and off. And sometimes that all on the same horse!

    My first horse had feet like iron. Rocks, gravel, even ice...nothing slowed her down. Farrier cursed rasping her feet, said they wore out his file, LOL! She was barefoot often.

    Except show season. (back then we had seasons, showing stopped in winter) Then she was shod all around. Why? Had nothing to do with wear or chipping...had everything to do with safety and traction. Can't use studs on a bare foot. And I did show her barefoot for part of one season. Having a horse slide, fall and land on you sucks for both rider and horse.

    But she could be shod and 100% that day and in fall the shoes were pulled and she was 100% that day too.

    My current horses...one wears shoes up front only. Tried barefoot with him...he stays ouchy-ish. So why make him uncomfy? Other horse barefoot all the time. He doesn't have a tough schedule...if we move to that we'll evaluate from there if he needs shoes or not.

    So shoes or not depends (or should) solely on each particular horse and what each horse is doing/needs. Shoes or not should never depend on riders' dogma. And no, not every horse can make the transition to barefoot.

    Hoof care should always be evaluated and not done by beliefs. Nobody cares what the owners' beliefs are or what they read...care for that hoof at that time for valid reasons only.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2005
    Location
    Southern California - Hemet
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    Default

    I tried having my mare barefoot, but her front hooves persisted in chipping no matter what we were doing. Her back hooves are fine, so she has front shoes only.

    Different cases for different horses and different situations.



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