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  1. #1
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    Aug. 10, 2010
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    Default Anyone with men with hypothyroidism?

    DH and I have known each other for 6 years. He's in his mid thirties and has a family history of diabetes and thyroid issues. Since we started dating, he's gained probably around 40 pounds. He is a tall guy, but athletic and works out regularly. Admittedly, part of that weight gain could be attributed to my love of cooking with butter but in the last two years and especially the last year I've really made an effort to use less fat, olive oil only, low sodium, whole grains, lean mean, green veggies... you get the picture. He is tired almost all the time. He can come home from work and take an hour nap and still be ready to go to bed at 9pm. The wierdest thing to me is when he hasn't gotten enough water or he's really tired, his speech will start to slurr a little bit. Like it sounds like he's drank a 6 pack but I know he hasn't had a drop to drink. He has asked his GP about the possibility that he might have a thyroid condition twice and the doc just said he needs to eat more protein and drink more water and the weight is nothing to worry about. I think he needs to get a second opinion and ask to be referred to a specialist. His mom and sis both have hypothroidism. I know the condition is more prevalent in women which is why I think his GP might be dismissing it. Anyone have experience with men with similar symptoms?
    Me: In a long-winded explanation of who GM is and why he is Important to the Sport
    Mr EmJ: So what you're saying is GM is so Important he could get Chik-Fil-A on Sunday?



  2. #2
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    Jul. 23, 2003
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    itty bitty town, GA
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    My husband has been an insulin dependent diabetic for over 30 years now. About 12 years ago, he started having very similar symptoms as your husband. His internist did check his thyroid but the results were inconclusive. Time drug on and my husband's conditions worsened significantly. He developed hand tremors and violent sick stomachs. He became so ill that he couldn't work. He went to several doctors, all of which kept making adjustments to his insulin. Finally he went to an endocrinologist who did another thyroid check and his thyroid was so bad that it was eventually decided that he would need to take the radiation pill that pretty well kills off a thyroid. His recovery was not instantaneous. He still needed to be on thyroid meds for the rest of his life which need adjustment here and there. But he did recover after about a year. If any of his doctors had bothered to do a follow up test, the results might not have come back inconclusive and he wouldn't have lost a year of his life from being so ill.

    So...don't let your DH get to the point mine did. Given his family history, he should go well beyond a GP and see an internist at least. GP's are great for certain illnesses and I love mine, but when you start talking about metabolic and thyroid issues, you need someone who specializes in it.
    Susan N.

    Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.



  3. #3
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    Nov. 8, 2005
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    NC
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    Default

    Yes. I have Hashimoto's which is controlled perfectly with levoxyl.

    My symptoms which came on suddenly a dozen years or so ago, sounded similar with respect to fatigue, though I had no discernible weight gain at the time.

    The trick is that hypothyroid conditions tend to be undertreated. The normal range for the TSH assay hasn't been updated by some reference labs (e.g., Labcorp) to reflect revised recommendations by the American Academy of Clinical Endocrinologists almost a decade ago. Many FP's seem to rely on the reference lab printouts, and therefore regard as normal patients who are hypothyroid and may even have frank symptoms. Relying solely and uncritically on a number is always a bad idea, in my opinion.

    It took a few months to get the dosage optimized and the reasonable practice is to err on the underside and increase the thyroxine supplementing meds as needed to resolve the symptoms and bring the TSH value down to somewhere between 1 and 3 units. (It started at 6 when first tested, I was told to 'wait and see' by my former doc but after 7 weeks I had waited and seen enough. By then it was 10.) I've had to tweak it since, generally very slightly upward every couple of years.

    Thanks for reminding me. Forgot to take my tablet today. :-)
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein



  4. #4
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    Aug. 10, 2010
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    Default

    bluedejavu, he also has stomach issues.... I think he is in agreement that he needs to ask for a second opinion... now to just nag him until he calls the doctor to set up the appointment (kidding)

    Thank you both for your responses!!
    Me: In a long-winded explanation of who GM is and why he is Important to the Sport
    Mr EmJ: So what you're saying is GM is so Important he could get Chik-Fil-A on Sunday?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2007
    Location
    Jasper, GA
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    2,148

    Default

    Any doc who says protein is the issue is not up to speed, so to speak. Americans rarely are protein deficiant, in fact most get too much!

    Time for not just a second opinion but a new doc!
    Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IZPHDzgX3s



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
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    Default

    Insist his doc test for it (and ALL the thyroid tests, not just the basic one-- I forget the names but there's basically a "simple" and an "in-depth" version).

    My husband had similar symptoms-- tired all the time (as in, could sleep 10+ hours a night, plus naps, and STILL nod off while driving), cold all the time, 40-lb weight gain in 6 months, dry skin, etc. His first family doc said it was sleep apnea and sent him to a sleep lab; he did indeed have sleep apnea, but the symptoms persisted despite using a CPAP. Then his speech started to get slurred, like he was drunk all the time, and I said, "enough is enough, this is getting checked NOW."

    Finally he switched doctors and I went with him to the first appointment so I could put my foot down (as hubby isn't good at that sort of thing; he tends to shut his mouth and agree to whatever the doctor says). Doc ran the appropriate blood work, and when I accompanied him back for his follow-up a few days later, his doc's first comment was, "I don't know how you're even up walking with levels this bad."

    He is now maintained effectively on generic synthroid, which costs $10 for a 90-day supply, and he goes back in 2x/year to have his levels checked. The weight isn't coming off very easily, but all the other symptoms have gone away.
    *friend of bar.ka

    "Evidently, I am an unrepentant b*tch, possible trouble maker, and all around super villian"



  7. #7
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Chapel Hill, NC
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    Default

    I also agree he needs to see an endocrinologist. I am hypothyroid due to Hashimoto's as well and the symptoms are similar. GI issues can also be thyroid related OR as I found out in my case, due to Celiac (they are highly correlated diseases)--a great number of folks with any auto-immune disease will also be gluten intolerant. Gluten is a big one for GI issues and sluggishness as well.

    Don't take no for an answer. You think something is wrong, so if his doc won't take him seriously it's time for a new doc.
    From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.



  8. #8
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    Jul. 23, 2003
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    itty bitty town, GA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EmJ628 View Post
    bluedejavu, he also has stomach issues.... I think he is in agreement that he needs to ask for a second opinion... now to just nag him until he calls the doctor to set up the appointment (kidding)

    Thank you both for your responses!!
    At least he's not in denial like some men are bad about doing. He definitely shouldn't waste too much time having another evaluation (by a different doc).
    Susan N.

    Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.



  9. #9
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    Feb. 4, 2004
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    Default

    My grandfather was diagnosed at about 40 and I believe fully managed on synthroid.



  10. #10
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    Nov. 8, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by bludejavu View Post
    At least he's not in denial like some men are bad about doing.
    It's pretty difficult for anyone to remain in denial when you're so tired at night that your face is at risk of splatting into the food atop your plate.
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
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    Default

    My dad's hypothyroid and so am I. Funny thing is we're the skinny ones in the family. Hypothyroidism can cause a wide range of symptoms.

    OP your husband definitely needs to get checked out!



  12. #12
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    My suggestion is that he be VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY aggressive with his doctors.

    VERY.

    Otherwise the poor guy is going to be dismissed and shuttled from doctor to doctor; probably for years.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  13. #13
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    Feb. 17, 2000
    Location
    Berlin, CT
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    Default

    Is he by chance having any memory issues? A lot of the symptoms you are mentioning are very similar to Primary Hyperparathyroidism. NOT a problem with the thyroid but a problem with one of the 4 parathyroid glands that reside behind the thyroid itself.

    The parathyroid glands control the level of calcium in the body. What happens is an andenoma forms on one of the glands and causes it to put out to much parathyroid hormone which causes the body to think it needs more calcium even if it doesn't. High calcium causes major havoc with the system!

    Some of the symptoms are:

    Brain Fog/memory issues ( I swear I was starting early alzheimers!!!)
    headaches
    stomache issues/heartburn
    kidney stones.
    extreme fatigue!!!
    weight gain
    cardiac issues

    www.parathyroid.com is a great site to get more info.

    also www.parathyroid-forum.co.uk
    "You are under arrest for operating your mouth under the influence of
    ignorance!" Officer Beck



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