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  1. #1

    Default horses skills before jumping?

    What skills do you think a horse needs before jumping? I waws talking to a friend about this and I can honestly say I have never thought about it before. If I think the horse can jump, I start jumping it... But I'd love to hear other people's thoughts on this, I feel like it could be really interesting.

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2012
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    Default

    The horse should be at least 4 years old, calm, forward, and straight in the ring and preferably out on trails if you have access to them for conditioning. He or she should be fit enough for a lesson of 45 min. duration at mostly trot and canter without getting terribly tired, stocked-up, etc. . . . and above all should respond automatically to your aids for transitions both up and down. Ability to lengthen and shorten over ground-pole exercises a plus!

    Make sure YOUR skills are right up there too--green on green equals black and blue!

    Good Luck!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2000
    Location
    Pawlet, VT US
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    I think you should be able to steer and regulate speed before you jump.
    madeline
    * What you release is what you teach * Don't be distracted by unwanted behavior* Whoever waits the longest is the teacher. Van Hargis



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
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    Given they are at least 4 years old, have respect of the aids, good steering, and can maintain straightness, I say go for it. You can teach a horse A LOT with cavalleti, and help the horse figure himself out with gymnastics.



  5. #5
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    Oct. 21, 2009
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    South Central: Zone 7
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    It should be able to do a training level dressage test. This means, walk, trot, canter with decent transitions (walk to trot, trot to canter, canter to trot). They need to be able to canter and trot a large circle and keep an even pace. Lead changes are not needed but it should be able to pick up either lead.

    The biggest indicator for me is the quality of the canter. Is it balanced? Is it an even pace? Does the horse engage its hind end and lift through its back? If yes, then jump. If no, then go back to the flat work.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
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    13,322

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    I usually introduce the concept if they can more or less w/t/c, turn reliably, and have a well installed "go" and "stop" button. I usually have a good feeling for when they are capable of getting the concept, but by no means are some ready to perform a dressage test! I like to keep their life interesting, and I do that by getting them out of the ring ASAP and by letting them jump baby jumps without making flatwork a huge thing. I want life to be fun and usually introducing new puzzles is what makes it fun for them.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2012
    Location
    Taft, TN
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    289

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    They should be at least 4, although I have popped a few three and a half year olds plus over tiny (think maybe 12") crossrails, just to keep things interesting. They need to be able to walk, trot, and canter on a circle, not just straight lines (this is a balance thing), steer reliably and be able to maintain straightness through groundpoles. Well-installed go and stop buttons are a big plus! Most of mine have been doing groundpole/cavaletti work as a minimum at the trot and occasionally at the canter before ever seeing a jump.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2004
    Location
    Souderton, PA
    Posts
    3,376

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    Under saddle?

    Steering and forward is all I worry about.

    I like my greenies to know FROM THE GET-GO, if I point you at an obstacle you are to go over it.

    Now, jumps are kept very low at this point...as in they can be walked over without fuss if need be. I believe they should be added in at random during a school to enforce the "go forward/over, but either way it's No Big Deal"
    My CANTER cutie Chip and IHSA shows!
    http://www.youtube.com/kheit86



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    5,500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by To the MAX View Post
    Under saddle?

    Steering and forward is all I worry about.

    I like my greenies to know FROM THE GET-GO, if I point you at an obstacle you are to go over it.

    Now, jumps are kept very low at this point...as in they can be walked over without fuss if need be. I believe they should be added in at random during a school to enforce the "go forward/over, but either way it's No Big Deal"
    I agree with all of this.

    I like to start them over little jumps during the breaking process.....so early in their 3 year old year. With my last guy he jumped in a clinic setting at 3yr 3mo of age after 60ish days under saddle, then got tossed out to pasture for the winter to grow up some more. The first jump he saw definitely came before we had anything more than rudimentary steering and very, very little ability to regulate speed (beyond go/not go).
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,488

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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    I usually introduce the concept if they can more or less w/t/c, turn reliably, and have a well installed "go" and "stop" button. I usually have a good feeling for when they are capable of getting the concept, but by no means are some ready to perform a dressage test! I like to keep their life interesting, and I do that by getting them out of the ring ASAP and by letting them jump baby jumps without making flatwork a huge thing. I want life to be fun and usually introducing new puzzles is what makes it fun for them.
    Quote Originally Posted by PNWjumper View Post
    I agree with all of this.

    I like to start them over little jumps during the breaking process.....so early in their 3 year old year. With my last guy he jumped in a clinic setting at 3yr 3mo of age after 60ish days under saddle, then got tossed out to pasture for the winter to grow up some more. The first jump he saw definitely came before we had anything more than rudimentary steering and very, very little ability to regulate speed (beyond go/not go).
    Yes. Little jumps helps them to understand steering, going forward, staying between the rider's legs, etc. It also helps to make things interesting for their baby brains.

    15 days undersaddle http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83NylIQOY8o Sold 3 days later.



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