The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst ... 45678 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 173
  1. #101
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2007
    Posts
    3,151

    Default

    Going to post a quick reply - sorry if I duplicate what others have said!
    If you have an Aldi grocery store near you, they are WAY cheaper for a lot of things. Boneless chicken breast ranges from 1.69 to 1.99 / lb. Eggs 1.50, butter 2.05, milk around $2 / gallon. These are HALF the price of what we pay over the border in Canada, so I make regular trips over to stock up. A lot of their canned goods are fairly priced, and they stand behind everything they sell with a great guarantee - double your money back if you aren't happy. They DO sell a lot of junk food, which unfortunately is quite good - we bought a bag of sweet potato chips yesterday since we were way past suppertime, and dang, they were GOOD!
    We also hit Walmart - they sell chicken leg quarters really cheap, I think 59c /lb and some of their house label canned suff is a good price.
    If I roast a chicken (or get the leg quarters), I save the bones, the trimmings from the carrots, onions and celery, and make soup stock out of it. Just cover it with water, bring it to a boil, and let it simmer for a couple of hours. Drain it, and discard all the solid stuff. That is basically free - it`s stuff that would normally go into the compost bin, but gets reused into some tasty dishes. No sodium added either!
    Soups are a good budget stretcher (using the above stock) - some of that leftover chicken, some lentils, or pasta, a bit of potato, carrot and celery - and it is GOOD.
    I find beef getting REALLY expesnive too...if I luck out and find it on sale, I buy extra and freeze it in 1 or 2 lb packages.
    Hope the ideas help - eating on a budget and eating healthy can be a real challenge!
    Dee
    ETA - and for desserts, things like homemade rice pudding and bread pudding are very affordable and VERY tasty!
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/



  2. #102
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    3,117

    Default

    I do have a crockpot!! Love it!!!

    The infamous $5 beef was at walmart needless to say that was a onetime buy...it's been lots of chicken and fish since then!

    And for LMH and Mosey and Co, I DO want healthy. But I also want AFFORDABLE and realistic. I know that's going to mean compromising on some health/quality of food. Maybe I should re-title "healthy-ish and kind of affordable".
    Tin Roof Living- Custom Wreaths & Home Décor
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/TinRoofLiving?ref=ss_profile
    PM me to receive a COTH discount!



  3. #103
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,494

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by talkofthetown View Post
    But GOOD LORD is it expensive!!!!

    Around here, even at the cheapo stores, a pound of ground beef is almost $5. One meal and that's gone. Fish is expensive, fresh produce is expensive, don't even say the word organic....everything's expensive! I try to go by sale flyers and coupons, but is there some older, wiser, motherly trick to getting decent food that's not going to take my entire paycheck? Maybe some food or recipe faves that I didn't realize were healthy, and are a fraction of the cost??

    Thanks!!
    Sam's Club 80% lean ground beef $2.88 a pound.
    Get a Sam's club membership and a freezer.

    http://www.samsclub.com/sams/shop/pr...questid=449066
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  4. #104
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    4,343

    Default

    It's all relative. The other day I had wild caught salmon for hubby, grass fed beef for me, veggies, sweet potato fries. The whole cost of the meal was under $10.

    Breakdown- 1 lb of salmon- $9.99 (so $3.50 for his portion)
    1 lb grass fed, organic beef- $5.50 so about $2 for my portion
    $1 for one sweet potato cut into fries
    $2.99 for organic greens cooked down.

    So $9.50 plus probably $1.00 in condiments (home made aioli with garlic). $10.50.

    Compared to eating out, much cheaper. I spend about $100 a week on food for 2 of us, and eat mainly meat, veg and fruits. When I ate lunch out, I spent $50 a week on that alone.

    For shopping for produce, I buy what is cheap and what I won't waste.



  5. #105
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2011
    Posts
    1,085

    Default

    Jeez, definitely didn't mean to open up a can of worms with my Dollar Store comment.

    I realize it isn't as healthy as buying organic, but as another poster stated, we have to operate within our own financial constraints. I eat plenty of things from the Dollar Store (and no, I'm not talking about Little Debbie cakes and soda). I'm 5'4", 120 lbs and the doc says I'm a healthy gal!

    A couple of posters mentioned Aldi...can't believe I forgot to mention that! SO and I had our first trip there a couple of weeks ago. Awesome prices. A couple of tips though: bring a quarter for a shopping cart. We didn't know about this, didn't have any change and ended up only buying as much as our arms could carry. My second tip is to bring your own shopping bags. No bags at Aldi! SO and I definitely looked like Aldi newbies but, now we know!
    "A horse gallops with his lungs, perseveres with his heart, and wins with his character." - Tesio



  6. #106
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2003
    Location
    St. Louis, MO USA
    Posts
    951

    Default

    There are bags at Aldi, you just have to buy them if you don't bring your own.
    My new mantra - \"Life is too short not to eat ice cream.\"
    ReRiders Clique



  7. #107
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    I have to say that I'm always surprised at all of the folks who are fans of Aldi. Yours must definitely be much better managed than ours.

    The Culpeper, VA, Aldi opened up a few years ago, & we've visited twice without purchasing one thing.

    The whole place reminds me of a government-surplus food warehouse. Actually, worse than that. Huge wooden pallets stacked with "fake" brand-name foods made to look like their pricier counterparts. Containers & names made to look & sound like the real thing; just a hair's breath away from fraud. The "meat" department? Both times we were there it was empty except for a few packages of beef & 5-POUND packages of Oscar Meyer bologna - lol!!!! The "fresh" produce was in cardboard boxes stacked on pallets right out in the middle of the store - no refrigeration. Millions of fruit flies were having a major festival. It gave me the creeps & shivers. I'd never dream of shopping there & don't know how anyone else can, especially since there's a Super Walmart directly across the street that carries name-brand groceries & meat/poultry along with fruit-fly-free produce at extremely comparable - if not lower - prices.

    Go figure.

    As for grocery shopping at "dollar stores"? Just be extra-diligent in checking expiration dates. Dollar Stores are well known for buying expired foodstuffs.



  8. #108
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
    Posts
    6,901

    Default

    I would suggest that you don't just take what other's say as facts at face value, no matter who they are, but do your own research
    yeah, go straight to the source- look on Pubmed for actual scientific studies about healthy and not so healthy diets. If you just Google and/or ask people what they think you'll get all kinds of answers, most of them dead wrong. The standard US-type high-fat high-carb diet is clearly an unhealthy diet. The low-fat/high carb diets are proving to be less healthy than had been hoped for, and many of the lower-meat/ "whole grains"/ vegetarian type diets fall into this kind of "well, not as healthy as hoped" category of diet. The current evidence seems to be pointing towards strong support of low-carb/ anti-inflammatory type diets as being the most healthy- South beach and Mediterranean style diets are both strongly supported as being very healthy.

    You can also actually read studies comparing the nutritional value of organic produce vs. non-organic produce, or free-range eggs vs. factory eggs, and decide if the price difference is worth it to you, so you can go off facts rather than someone's distorted opinions.



  9. #109
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,292

    Default

    Without reading pages (especially as it's Wednesday and I'm paranoid they're going to close Off Topic!) make stuff that stretches. As said on page one, a pound of ground beef shouldn't be gone in one meal.

    Organic is not automatically healthier. Just more expensive. Vegetables and fruits are vegetables and fruits. What will get you is taste, which means don't buy out of season, tropical, or anything that had to be shipped a long way.

    Canned is cheaper than fresh or frozen and if you buy water-pack, no added sugar (and buy low-sodium.) It also keeps a LONG time. I love canned tomatoes because I can make a sauce out of anything.

    Avoid anything calling for processed or packets. Baking cakes from a box isn't baking (and wastes money-you actually DON'T have to add anything but water, they just put the eggs and oil on there because people didn't believe it was baking.) It's not a "recipe" if you just dump a packet of salad dressing mix on the chicken. It's cheaper in the long run to buy flour, salt, etc. that keeps and can be used in multiple recipes.



  10. #110
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post

    You can also actually read studies comparing the nutritional value of organic produce vs. non-organic produce, or free-range eggs vs. factory eggs, and decide if the price difference is worth it to you, so you can go off facts rather than someone's distorted opinions.
    Speaking of which, today I read this article on the topic of the (non)benefits of organic: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/04/sc...r=2&ref=health

    Not a surprise to me as a farm girl, but my foodie friends seem somehow surprised.



  11. #111
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,292

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fordtraktor View Post
    Speaking of which, today I read this article on the topic of the (non)benefits of organic: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/04/sc...r=2&ref=health

    Not a surprise to me as a farm girl, but my foodie friends seem somehow surprised.
    Considering that, if anything, my neighbor's "non-organic" eggs (from chickens who eat whatever he feeds them and whatever bugs they catch wandering around) taste if anything BETTER than the expensive organic/omega-enhanced/super-nutritious eggs from the grocery store, I'm not especially surprised.

    And he only charges $2/dozen....



  12. #112
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,478

    Default

    I do have a crockpot!! Love it!!!
    Well there's a huge help right there, Talkofthetown!

    I've had crockpots forever...but have to admit they became 10x more useful after I bought a big crockpot cookbook. I tended to have 2-3 recipes I made in the crockpot before that cookbook. Now I can use it probably 300 days in a row with different meals, LOL!

    I was amazed at how many different, inexpensive, delicious things I could make in that! However, instead of buying a book you can get all the recipes you want free online now. Seriously, spend a little time surfing the net for crockpot recipes. Bookmark to favorites the ones you like.

    Then make a meal list for the week. Go over each recipe, mark down the ingredients you don't have on your shopping list. Try to match up sales meats with recipes if possible. It takes a few weeks before you get into an easy groove and can start cutting your shopping costs *way* down.

    Many folks assume healthy home made foods are a lot more expensive. They're not. Especially if you know how to cook and don't mind doing it or have the time to do it.

    My husband and I eat a Mediterranean style diet (mostly healthy fats, dark greens, non-starchy veggies, chicken, fish and smaller amounts of beef) and I can feed us on a MUCH lower budget than the folks at the grocery store buying all those craptastic, carb-filled convenience foods.

    I also own a smoker...but I'm a sucker for smoked anything. Oh, and I grill year round. It doesn't have to be summer to grill. I just clean the snow off of the grill and shovel a short path to it after a storm and grill meals too. Grilled meats, fish and veggies always taste better.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  13. #113
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,096

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fordtraktor View Post
    Speaking of which, today I read this article on the topic of the (non)benefits of organic: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/04/sc...r=2&ref=health

    Not a surprise to me as a farm girl, but my foodie friends seem somehow surprised.
    If I posted that, everyone would be on me like a free range rooster on a June bug.



  14. #114
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    30,895

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    If I posted that, everyone would be on me like a free range rooster on a June bug.
    but we all know Big Ag brainwashed you!


    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  15. #115
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2009
    Location
    NC piedmont
    Posts
    2,123

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    The whole place reminds me of a government-surplus food warehouse. Actually, worse than that. Huge wooden pallets stacked with "fake" brand-name foods made to look like their pricier counterparts. Containers & names made to look & sound like the real thing; just a hair's breath away from fraud.
    If the nutrition is the same and it tastes good, why spend extra for a name on the box? That seems pretty snobby to me...

    BUT actually, many of the "fake" brand names at Aldi are the real thing. The company buys a run of, say Cheerios, from the manufacturer and has it packaged in generic packaging. Because they aren't selling the name they can sell the exact same product, made by the exact same manufacturer, for less. Of course, that still won't appeal to some brand snobs because their pantry won't look like they spend twice as much on their food than we poor souls...

    As for the produce...ever buy at a farm stand or farmer's market? Not refrigerated there, and that's, IMO, the best place to buy. Not to mention, produce is grown outside. In the SUN. Produce is refrigerated at grocery stores to make it last longer so they don't need to have it shipped in daily. And our local farmer's market also has a few flies....the horror! But I wash my produce before I eat it, and it hasn't killed me, so...

    Anyone have tips on finding and/or stretching healthier cuts of meat? 80% ground beef at $2.99 is a good price, but I don't like it; I like 93%. I cannot stand chicken thighs or legs, either, not even cut up in things.



  16. #116
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Folks - crockpots are great. But they have absolutely ZERO bearing on whether or not you're eating "healthy".



  17. #117
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HenryisBlaisin' View Post
    If the nutrition is the same and it tastes good, why spend extra for a name on the box? That seems pretty snobby to me...

    BUT actually, many of the "fake" brand names at Aldi are the real thing. The company buys a run of, say Cheerios, from the manufacturer and has it packaged in generic packaging. Because they aren't selling the name they can sell the exact same product, made by the exact same manufacturer, for less. Of course, that still won't appeal to some brand snobs because their pantry won't look like they spend twice as much on their food than we poor souls...

    As for the produce...ever buy at a farm stand or farmer's market? Not refrigerated there, and that's, IMO, the best place to buy. Not to mention, produce is grown outside. In the SUN. Produce is refrigerated at grocery stores to make it last longer so they don't need to have it shipped in daily. And our local farmer's market also has a few flies....the horror! But I wash my produce before I eat it, and it hasn't killed me, so...

    Anyone have tips on finding and/or stretching healthier cuts of meat? 80% ground beef at $2.99 is a good price, but I don't like it; I like 93%. I cannot stand chicken thighs or legs, either, not even cut up in things.
    Uh - the processed food crap sold at Aldi's may be the same as the processed food crap sold at regular stores under brand names, but it's still processed food crap that looks even crappier under "fake" packaging/names.

    As for the produce, I shop twice weekly at local farmers markets. Strangely enough - no swarms of fruit flies. Nor are there any at any of the local grocery stores - Walmart included. Go figure.

    And folks - Aldi might be "affordable", but there's nothing about it that's "healthy".



  18. #118
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    If I posted that, everyone would be on me like a free range rooster on a June bug.
    Bluey, it's in the NEW YORK TIMES!!! If the NYT feels like they have to publish an article like this the conspiracy theorists might as well just give up.

    Anyway, Aldi and Trader Joe's are the same company marketed to different sectors. Just keep that in mind if you love one and hate the other.



  19. #119
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fordtraktor View Post
    Anyway, Aldi and Trader Joe's are the same company marketed to different sectors. Just keep that in mind if you love one and hate the other.
    Yes - I'm completely aware of that, & am SEVERELY disappointed that the company chose to install the cheap & creepy Aldi's here in Culpeper instead of a Trader Joe's. Like we're some sort of hillbilly cousin or something.

    The company may be the same, but the store setup & quality between the two are definitely NOT. What skeezes me is that Trader Joe prices are, frankly, just as inexpensive as the Aldi crap. What a shame that Aldi feels some sort of bizarre need to dumb down to a welfare-like environment. They should have just stuck to Trader Joe's - inexpensive prices, quality food, & not making folks feel like they're on the dole.



  20. #120
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2007
    Location
    North-Central IL
    Posts
    3,207

    Default

    Our local Aldi has always been clean and rather well-stocked I didn't think to mention it because I didn't realize it was a national chain.
    Quarry Rat



Similar Threads

  1. Healthy Food to Bring to Horse Show for Lunch
    By ParadoxFarm in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: Oct. 12, 2011, 03:57 PM
  2. Crunchy cat food that doesn't support "healthy weight"?
    By red mares in forum The Menagerie
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Oct. 3, 2011, 03:08 PM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last Post: Dec. 10, 2010, 03:57 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Dec. 9, 2010, 11:07 PM
  5. Replies: 25
    Last Post: Mar. 13, 2010, 09:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •