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  1. #161
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2007
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    North-Central IL
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    Interesting on the tomato gravy!
    Quarry Rat



  2. #162
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
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    3,932

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    Thanks so much! and yes I do all but ricotta with my cream, a dash goes in darn near everything. I do use it, but when its on sale I LOVE to stock up, but its annoying having quarts stashed all over the fridge.

    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    I know you weren't talking to me, but tomato gravy is awesome. It's a poor-person food extraordinaire. For that matter, everything at Hillbilly Housewife is poor people food extraordinaire:
    http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/tomatogravy.htm
    Oh wow! Thats like a tomato bisque type for-real gravy, lol!

    I am a transplant from the other end of my state (and I stick out like a sore thumb ). People here call tomato sauce or marinara "gravy". (real authentic gravy has meat in it, but its slang to call any red sauce gravy). I distinguish with "tomato gravy" as gravy still means *brown* to me but if you go to a diner and ask for a side of gravy, it'll be red.

    I'm finally getting the knack of the gravies, but pork roll will forever be Taylor Ham to me.

    I do like calling it gravy though, as it has a much more savory and rich connotation, which it is.... completely unlike the Prego crap I grew up on.
    Just because you’re afraid, doesn’t mean you’re in danger. Just because you feel alone, doesn’t mean nobody loves you. Just because you think you might fail, doesn’t mean you will.



  3. #163
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
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    2,888

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    I am going to try the tomato gravy, and would you please share your beef shins and turnip recipe..I love turnips!



  4. #164
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
    2,470

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    Quote Originally Posted by buck22 View Post
    Can you really freeze milk???? Like... a jug of milk??? What about cream?????? Does it separate when it defrosts?
    Milk freezes well. It takes a minimum of two days in the refrigerator to thaw a half gallon, three days for a gallon. Costco sells the box of three half-gallons, which are a nice size for a small family.

    And yes, you just put it in the freezer. the other day, I had a plastic gallon jug develop a tear in the seam and milk was dripping out, but that is the only time I've had that happen, and it could have been because I shook it up too hard with the big block of frozen milk in the middle when I was trying to get it to hurry up and thaw.



  5. #165
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mosey_2003 View Post
    Interesting on the tomato gravy!
    Tomato Gravy = Tomato Sauce.

    Ever watch "The Sopranos" or any Mafia movies? The "gravy" is mentioned in practically every food scene - lol!!



  6. #166
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    In my car, between work, home, and the barn!
    Posts
    359

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    Ditto the Costco suggestion! With a family of five and one on the way, we do almost all of our shopping at Costco. I find that I buy only what we need, too, because you don't have all the tempting extra stuff there. You want Oreos? There's only one kind - no Double Stuff, mint, extra chocolate, whatever. The produce is really good, and so is the meat - we've had two dinners this week of pulled pork sandwiches from the crock pot. A package of 12 huge rolls is $4.50, and pork shoulder roast is 1.99/lb. Toss that and an onion into the crock pot, add BBQ sauce (cheap!) later, and you've got some delicious sandwiches. Romaine is $3.99 for a bag of six - that's plenty for several salads.

    Good luck! I used to do all of our shopping at the "regular" grocery store and I found that it was really getting out of hand - I was spending incredible amounts of money on food we didn't really need.



  7. #167
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
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    3,932

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    Quote Originally Posted by tradewind View Post
    I am going to try the tomato gravy, and would you please share your beef shins and turnip recipe..I love turnips!
    Absolutely! Its one of my most favorite dishes

    2 large wax turnips
    4-6 nice meaty beef shins
    1.5-c beef or veggie broth
    flour for dredging
    olive oil
    salt (I use grey sea salt)
    pepper
    large pinch marjoram
    two large pinches fresh or dried parsley
    onion powder
    bay leaf
    small handful fresh thyme (4-8 full sprigs)
    few leaves of fresh rosemary
    1-2 cloves garlic, smashed or sliced thinly
    few pats of butter

    Optional
    wee splash of red wine, or good sherry
    one small sun dried tomato, sliced
    one small shallot, sliced thinly
    teaspoon of minced lemon zest


    Select beef shins that are nice and thick and meaty all the way around the bone. Do not accept those pathetic little crooked ones with an apologetic little nubbin of meat clinging to one side. Ask the butcher if no suitable ones are available.

    Use a large heavy pot with a tight fitting lid and a somewhat non stick finish. I use a large enameled cast iron dutch oven and it works a dream for this dish.

    I chop my peeled wax turnips into large bite sized chunks. Too large and they're ungainly to eat, too small and they'll fall apart and mash.

    I heat a splash or two of OO in the pot until its shimmering and then toss the turnips in with a large pinch of salt. I cook the turnips on high med/high stirring only once in a while to make sure they're not sticking. I cook until at least one side is a dark mottled brown. The turnips will not be cooked yet however. Root vegetables caramelize beautifully - turnips especially - they get nutty and rich and fragrant. Browning of the turnips is the key to this dish. It takes about 15-25 minutes depending on how large the turnips are.

    Meanwhile, I dredge my room temp shins in flour seasoned with salt, pepper and onion powder. Onion powder works a strange miracle on slow cook one pot dishes I find, often better than the real McCoy.

    When the turnips are sufficiently browned, I transfer them into a bowl and then deglaze the hot pot with a splash of broth making sure to get up all the brown bits with a wooden spoon. If you want to use wine or sherry, now is the time to splash that in as well.

    When the liquid is nearly reduced I splash a bit more OO and in go the shins. The pot is very hot (has been on med high this entire time) and I hope to get a nice dark crust on the shins. The flour will want to stick and burn, so don't be afraid to use more OO or even move the shins around and deglaze the pan if needed to keep the flour bits from burning, the shins must be babysat as the flour will blacken as soon as you turn your head.

    I cook them hot and fast adding OO or deglazing as needed until they have a thick nice dark crust on each end and on the round side as well if they're thick pieces. The marrow and bone should be browning nicely too.

    If I'm dong more than 4 shins I work in two batches. Each batch takes about 15-20 minutes to fully brown the meat.

    When the meat is browned I remove it from the pot (usually just set it on top of the turnips) and then do some serious deglazing. I splash in about a half cup of broth and make sure I get up every single bit with my wooden spoon. As soon as the broth starts simmering, I toss in the garlic. This would be the time to add the shallot and/or sun dried tomato if using.

    At this point in the bottom of the pot is a pool of the most heavenly, fragrant, meaty turnipy shimmery velvety reduction, almost syrup consistency (yes do lick the spoon its pure nirvana!!). I turn down the heat to medium and onto this pool I put my handful of thyme, rosemary and bay leaf. I place the meat back on top of this and over the top sprinkle half my parsley and marjoram and another large pinch of salt and few cracks of pepper. On top of this I dump the turnips, making sure to get all the juice accumulated in the bowl. Over this I sprinkle my remaining parsley and marjoram.

    Then I pour in the remnants of the beef broth. Should be enough liquid left to come most the way up of but not completely cover the shins. You want them sitting deep but not submerged. I put a piece of tin foil over the pot and then the lid for an extra tight seal.

    The dish now needs 1.5-3 hours to cook low and slow, depending on how many shins are in there. This can be done on the lowest flame on the range, or in the preheated oven at 300.

    20 minutes before its ready I open the lid and toss my butter pats over the top to give a little extra creamy goodness to the turnips. If you're using the grated lemon zest this is the time to sprinkle it in.

    When done, the meat should be so tender you can barely get it out of the pot, and the turnips should be cooked to perfection. Most if not all of the marrow should have melted away and you'll have the most delightful rich velvety gravy left over. The flour should have thickened it to the consistency of warm syrup, but if you prefer thicker just simmer it on the stove for a few minutes with the lid off and it will thicken right up.

    About the optional ingredients:

    I make this dish a lot, I love it. What I love most about it is the incredibly nutty and delicious flavor of the caramelized turnips against the rich deep robust beefiness of the shin meat. I have not found another cut of meat that is quite this delightful in this useage, perhaps its the marrow. It is one of those perfect pairings of flavors.

    Problem I run into with this dish is I get too fancy with it Even though the flavors are strong and robust, this meal quickly turns into "beef stew with turnips" if you add too much other than the basics. The main flavor should be the all the roasting. Even garlic I keep minimal.

    So, through trial and error, I have learned if I feel the urge for onion, choose a small shallot. If I feel the need for more depth of flavor, a few slices of sun dried tomato, or splash of red wine or sherry highlights the beef beautifully. Just a small bit of either will do.

    I do add a teaspoon of minced lemon zest if I have a lemon on hand. Not to add a lemon flavor, but a small bit of zest wakes up the rest of the flavors and makes them brighter I've found.

    This meal goes great with cooked greens and a hearty drink like a nice dark Dunkle.

    So glad you asked for this, I really love this meal and am thrilled to share. enjoy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Just because you’re afraid, doesn’t mean you’re in danger. Just because you feel alone, doesn’t mean nobody loves you. Just because you think you might fail, doesn’t mean you will.



  8. #168
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
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    2,888

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    Thank You So Much Buck22..I am going to make this next week!



  9. #169
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2007
    Location
    North-Central IL
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    3,155

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Tomato Gravy = Tomato Sauce.

    Ever watch "The Sopranos" or any Mafia movies? The "gravy" is mentioned in practically every food scene - lol!!
    Ahhh, I gotcha. No, never have watched The Sopranos or mafia movies
    Quarry Rat



  10. #170
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2007
    Posts
    3,150

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    OK,this is kind of off and on topic for this thread...
    Does anybody know where I can find equivalencies for American and Canadian beef cuts (and pork possibly?) I see some tasty sounding recipes on sites such as allrecipes.com but would love a quick reference to know what we call the cut up here.
    Thanks!
    Dee
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/



  11. #171
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2002
    Posts
    355

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    This is a great recipe blog which breaks down the prices on every recipe and has suggestions for how to stock your kitchen.

    http://budgetbytes.blogspot.com/

    Stop eating meat or cut waaaaaaay down. If you're serious about saving money (and eating healthier provided you're not replacing it with huge amounts of sugar and simple carbs) it's now a delicacy, if anything.

    Also, a plug for Aldi: if there's an Aldi near you they are amazing on prices of staples like milk, eggs, cheese, yoghurt, baking stuff, pasta, vegetables (fresh or frozen). They are cheap anyway and on top of that have incredible sales on fresh fruits & veg, and they are the same or better quality you'll find in a "normal" supermarket. The only problem is that their selection is limited to basics. Plus, they're owned by the same company which owns Trader Joe's and Tesco, and they carry extremely good German chocolate as well as some Trader Joe's items repackaged with Aldi brand names for less $.



  12. #172
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,470

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    Dee...I'm pretty sure Canada and USA have the same names for beef cuts. Except maybe what we call round I think is called hip up there.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  13. #173
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2004
    Location
    Upper Peninsula, Michigan
    Posts
    2,037

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    I believe that "healthy" is a whole food diet. Specifically, paleo or primal.

    Here is a great guide to shopping on a budget with regards to whole foods:
    http://whole9life.com/2011/01/paleo-...grocery-store/

    And a great PDF on what veggies are worth buying organic and which arent.

    http://whole9life.com/wp-content/upl...oduce-2012.pdf



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