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  1. #1
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    Default Blog on crest vs. auto release

    Ran into this interesting blog, seems there are several points of merit. The photos are interesting as well.

    Never been a fan of the lay up the neck jumping, the author states that the crest release is born of laziness in not developing proper balance, allowing riders to advance in height without a proper foundation.

    Counterpoints?

    http://glenshee.blogspot.com/2009/01...as-ruined.html



  2. #2
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    Default


    It must be true. I read it on the internet.



  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ravencrest_Camp View Post
    It must be true. I read it on the internet.
    If you disagree (or agree), I am interested in the how/why.



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Misanthrope View Post
    If you disagree (or agree), I am interested in the how/why.
    Spend -- literally -- 30 seconds searching the forum and you'd find enough to keep you buys reading for a week.

    Then get back to us.



  5. #5
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    Nov. 22, 2010
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    Default

    While I didn't admittedly read that whole blog post, I skimmed it and found that it took a bit of a harsh perspective on the crest release. In every picture that they used to portray a crest release, they also used a rider with poor lower leg position and a very low upper body but (in my opinion, incorrectly) attributed all of the error in the photo to the rider's hand position.

    I think a well-done crest release is a much better option than a poorly done auto-release. Here are some pictures of GOOD crest releases that the author of that blog might want to consider:

    http://ridemagazine.com/sites/defaul...nd_saphire.jpg

    http://www.floridahorse.com/2008Jax/...MWard11808.jpg

    http://www1.pictures.gi.zimbio.com/O...rYITE-cDIl.jpg

    http://cdn.newsday.com/polopoly_fs/1..._600/image.jpg

    i mean it can't be too horrible if those people are all using it...can it?

    just my .02.



  6. #6
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Default

    Is this your blog? Why not just say so?



  7. #7
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    Jan. 25, 2011
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    Default

    I personally dislike most "extreme" views on anything to do with riding, such as those in the blog post OP linked to.

    Why?

    Because I think that different methods and styles of riding are all tools. Just like a good toolbox has more than one kind of screwdriver, I think riders need to have more than one way of riding in their "toolbox." (that applies for more than just releases, but I'll stick with releases) I know how to properly execute the basic releases (long, short, automatic, crest) and utilize them all regularly. I would never eliminate one from my toolbox because I felt like one would do a better job 100% of the time than having four options to go to.

    The properly done crest release has its place as does the properly automatic.

    As I said, that's just my opinion. Off my soapbox now.
    I've heard there's more to life than an FEI tent and hotel rooms, so I'm trying it.



  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    Is this your blog? Why not just say so?
    Because if you have to post your own blogs on a forum, people might not realize it contains fresh new never-before-seen insight. It's much better if a stranger posts it and implies the same.

    Oh wait...



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by LochNessD View Post
    Because if you have to post your own blogs on a forum, people might not realize it contains fresh new never-before-seen insight. It's much better if a stranger posts it and implies the same.

    Oh wait...
    LOL!



  10. #10
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    Mar. 22, 2005
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    I'm with GingerJumper. That's pretty normal, though

    I think different releases have their places. I happen to use the crest release far more often than the automatic release for a variety of reasons, but it's my personal preference (and my horse's preference!).



  11. #11
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    Jan. 9, 2012
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    Default

    Considering this blog post appears to be from several years ago, I'd guess it's probably not the OP's. If it was someone looking to drive traffic, there are much newer posts they could have linked to.



  12. #12
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    Aug. 31, 2011
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    I learned to ride in the 70s and came back to riding after I had my kids. I discovered this blog some time ago and bookmarked it because I liked it. It helped me figure out what was bothering me about the riders I was watching at the local shows. I do think riders who use the current style can be very skillful, but I think they are at a disadvantage because their stirrups are too long and they tend to "stand" in their stirrups and drape themselves forward. The crest release is just one of the characteristics of this style of riding.

    Quote Originally Posted by goodlife View Post
    While I didn't admittedly read that whole blog post, I skimmed it and found that it took a bit of a harsh perspective on the crest release. In every picture that they used to portray a crest release, they also used a rider with poor lower leg position and a very low upper body but (in my opinion, incorrectly) attributed all of the error in the photo to the rider's hand position.

    Not true. You are correct that the riders show poor position, but the blog author does not blame this on their release alone. She mentions specifically that the modern riders in the pictures she uses all ride with too-long stirrups, pivot off the knee, and drape themselves on the horse's neck in order to get their weight out of the saddle.

    I think a well-done crest release is a much better option than a poorly done auto-release. Here are some pictures of GOOD crest releases that the author of that blog might want to consider:

    http://ridemagazine.com/sites/defaul...nd_saphire.jpg

    http://www.floridahorse.com/2008Jax/...MWard11808.jpg

    http://www1.pictures.gi.zimbio.com/O...rYITE-cDIl.jpg

    http://cdn.newsday.com/polopoly_fs/1..._600/image.jpg

    True--the pictures you use are all characteristic of excellent riding. However, note that these are all highly-skilled jumper riders, none of whom is riding with too-long stirrups. The blog author specifically mentions hunter and equitation riders as most likely to be guilty of the faults she mentions. I can't believe she would have any issue with Beezie Madden.

    i mean it can't be too horrible if those people are all using it...can it?

    just my .02.
    I agree that the blog author is a bit harsh against the crest release, and I don't want to incite a flame war. But she makes some valid points, and the pictures of Kathy Kusner are sublime.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by supershorty628 View Post
    I'm with GingerJumper. That's pretty normal, though

    I think different releases have their places. I happen to use the crest release far more often than the automatic release for a variety of reasons, but it's my personal preference (and my horse's preference!).
    Great minds and all that

    Horse preference is also super important, which you mentioned. Not all horses like an auto release, no matter how perfectly executed it is! Different horses like different things, no way around it. There is no one size fits all in ANYTHING when it comes to horses.
    I've heard there's more to life than an FEI tent and hotel rooms, so I'm trying it.



  14. #14
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    I thought it was interesting that the author of the blog didn't post any pictures of herself doing an automatic release... if it's so awsome you'd think she'd want to show how much better she rides now that she's using it... also the picture of the novice rider using one is just scarey, since that horse looks like it is about to flip over.



  15. #15
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    Sep. 15, 2002
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    I think this was a well written article explaining (with excellent photos) exactly what a crest vs automatic release really is. Having just come back into the hunter world after 35 years and and having never been taught this "new" type of riding I simply could not master this touching the neck thing when I started back over fences. Never, NEVER was I ever permitted to do such a thing when I was riding back then. It was considered a mortal sin to touch your horses neck anywhere over a jump. If you did not have enough balance to ride without doing so you simply did not jump until you did.

    When my current and well known trainer told me in no uncertain terms that I simply could not show in the hunter ring without using this crest release thing I thought to myself how sad is it that a beginner technique over fences has become the norm and those of us that still perfer to use the more shall I say advanced? method would be penalized in the show ring. Well I simply could not force myself to do it, my trainer threw a hissy fit because I refused to relearn to do it the "proper" way and we have since parted ways. I will continue to do it the old fashioned way and will have to wait to hear what the new hunter judges will think.



  16. #16
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    There is a huge difference, though, between attempting to do any sort of release with stirrups that are too long and doing a proper one with stirrups at the appropriate length. All of the pictures in that blog show a crest release with excessively long stirrups.

    I don't like to use other people's pictures without their permission, so I'm using a few of mine. I don't use the automatic release on my horse, nor do I think it's the second coming of sliced bread that a lot of people think it is. It's a tool and it has its place, just like anything else in riding, but the high and mighty attitude that some people get about it is, frankly, kind of strange.

    Stirrups properly adjusted, decent sized fence, crest release: https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...90547378_n.jpg

    Again (not as good of an angle, sorry): https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...7_372866_n.jpg

    And I can do an auto release (https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphot...917_4029_n.jpg) but I choose not to.

    There is nothing about a properly done crest release that makes you unbalanced or too far out of the saddle. With that being said, I'm not sure that the hunter ring is the best place to look for pictures of classic equitation, regardless of release.



  17. #17
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    I never ceases to amaze me how much mental energy some people waste by getting upset about things other people do that has absolutely no bearing or effect on them personally.



  18. #18
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    That was a really weird perspective, that crest releases allow bad riders to become top level competitors (the whole cheating theme--odd . . . ), or that they completely derail your balance. IMO it is reversed--if you lose your leg you fall on the horse's neck. But there is no reason why a properly executed release would make you lose your lower body.

    I event, which may teach things a little differently, but in general there the release has to do with the fence/combination, the terrain, how your horse is going (too bold, going to be long/short), what you need for the next fence.

    But defining the ride by the hand position seems awfully myopic.



  19. #19
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    Aug. 12, 2001
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    Both releases can lead to awful habits when not taught from the grass root up.

    We have a trainer in this area infamous for telling her beginner to mid-level riders "THROW YOUR HANDS TO HIS EARS". (we all have one) If it was one rider who tends to smack the horse in the mouth o/f, I could understand. But it is literally each and every one. Then what you get is the lovely hurled-upper-body and snatch back affect. It's an atrocity...

    I feel a big fault with the crest release is limited adjustment over the fence. In the lower level hunters, this may not be such a necessity. While progressing to high caliber hunter classes, jumpers or XC style riding o/f, it' a vital skill needed. And if you're an older rider, we all know how difficult it is adjusting our bodies to a new skill. I think this is how the crest release is viewed as a crutch, limiting a riders' ability to advance in their jumping.
    "Truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it and ignorance may deride it, but, in the end, there it is." Sir Winston Churchhill



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmmyByNature View Post
    I never ceases to amaze me how much mental energy some people waste by getting upset about things other people do that has absolutely no bearing or effect on them personally.
    Eh, we all do it. On this forum, for instance, I have been astonished more than once by how much energy people spend on the question of whether or not one should ride in a black saddle, a green jacket, a breast plate, or rust breeches. I belong to a baseball forum, too, and people absolutely agonize over team decisions they have no control over. Why do they do it when it "has absolutely no bearing or effect on them personally"? I'm not sure, but it sure is human nature.

    In this case, I think it's partly a matter of people who are older feeling that things have changed for the worse (which may or may not be true) and partly general concern for the state of the sport. I teach at a university, and we all worry constantly over the state of education, students today, administrative and state attitudes, etc.--many of which don't "affect us personally" but which cause us concern for the future.



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