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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
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    Default Weighing horse feeds

    I am going to get a bit more scientific in the management of my mare's diet, as we try to get some pounds on her. I've set up an account at FeedXL, and part of what they ask about diet is how much of everything your horse is eating. And of course her feed is measured out in scoops, and FeedXL correctly wants to know weights.

    Any good tips on a cheap way and uncomplicated to weigh feed at the barn? (IE, I don't want to acquire an expensive scale, if possible)
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  2. #2
    Lori B is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Default

    Would something like this work?

    http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh...weighing+scale

    with the food to be weighed measured into a lightweight plastic grocery bag?
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  3. #3
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    Mar. 3, 2007
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    North-Central IL
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    Default

    I use a large food scale, think I found it for $10 or less at Farm & Fleet, any general type store should have them (Wal-Mart, Target, etc.) and zero it out with the bucket on it, then pour feed in.
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    That's got to be expensive, how much oil can you press out of a chipmunk?



  4. #4
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    Default

    Put a measured amount in a lightweight plastic bag (i.e. the type you put produce in) and weigh it at the supermarket.

    For old-school pellets & sweet feed, 1 quart is approximately equal to 1 lb.

    I'm sure this doesn't hold true for many of the new formulations.
    "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince


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  5. #5
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Default

    At thrift shops, and second hand stores you can frequently find old kitchen scales. They may be battered but are usually sturdy and accurate. sorta like this but homelier

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/LA-Weight-Lo...item1c2ac694de
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
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    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
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    Default

    Take a few 1 gallon plastic freezer bag to the barn. Dump a scoop in 1 bag, squeeze out air, seal. Dump a 1/2 scoop in a 2nd bag, squeeze out air.

    Take both bags home (assuming you have a scale) and weigh them.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies


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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    Default

    You can get a fish scale at Walmart, I have this one, it was $5.00 adn goes up to 50 lbs:
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Berkley-Sc...-Tape/16637411

    I hang a bucket on the scale, then set it to "0" lbs. Then, whatever I add to it, the weight of that feed is what the scale shows.

    Then I can use that amount and fill the scoop, so I know for next time just how much of the scoop I need of that feed to equal say, 2 lbs for example.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Pacific Northwest
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    Default

    I use the same scale that I weigh hay with - the American Weigh fish scale referenced above. If you have a kitchen or postal scale, that works too. I slip mine into a plastic zip bag to keep clean if I take it to the barn. All are pretty cheap and I find a scale useful for a lot of things (baking especially, other cooking, weighing packages to mail, etc.). A lightweight luggage scale from Target or similar would be super cheap and work for feed, just isn't durable enough for me and weighing hay, cold weather, etc.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2011
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    Default

    More horse owners and barn managers should weigh their feed. It's amazing how many still think a quart of feed equals one pound.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
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    Default

    Also, depending on what feed you are using, you may be able to find the pounds per quart online from the manufacturer or retailer. If you buy your feed at Southern States (Triple Crown, Legends, or Southern States brands), for example, they have a chart here: http://www.southernstates.com/docs/e...asurements.pdf

    Blue Seal also has a chart here: http://www.blueseal.com/equine/index.php



  11. #11
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    Mar. 4, 2007
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    Western Washington
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    Default

    Plastic garbage bag with the built-in tie-off handle and a fish scale works well for weighing hay, cubes, any concentrate.

    Easier than setting the tare weight on the scale.



  12. #12
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    Jul. 23, 2003
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    itty bitty town, GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Effie1221 View Post
    More horse owners and barn managers should weigh their feed. It's amazing how many still think a quart of feed equals one pound.
    I adamantly agree! When I got my little kitchen scale off ebay to use in the barn, I was so surprised at the variation in weights. I can't imagine ever going back to the guessing game.
    Susan N.

    Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.



  13. #13
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Default

    A kitchen scale is cheap and very handy to have for all kinds of things.

    If you are not willing to buy one, measure out and put in baggies like someone else mentioned and carry the baggies to your local grocery store and drop the baggie on one of the scales in the produce department.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
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    Middle USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mosey_2003 View Post
    I use a large food scale, think I found it for $10 or less at Farm & Fleet, any general type store should have them (Wal-Mart, Target, etc.) and zero it out with the bucket on it, then pour feed in.

    I second this. I use one and just fill a coffee can ( or whatever) and it is easy. Just remember to place your container on first and zero it out.



  15. #15
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    For grain for a horse we were rehabbing out of a bad situation and needed several meals a day, we used a plain Walmart kitchen scale, those with a transparent salad bow looking top.
    It didn't cost but a few dollars and you could weight the grain in the bowl or take it off and weight your full scoop right on the round platform, after first weighing the scoop empty.

    Still works fine after all these years.



  16. #16
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    May. 7, 2004
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    Linden, CA
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    Default

    I have one of those hanging scales. Put the bucket on, zero it, dump the feed in, weigh it, yay.

    This is waaaaaay fancier than mine, and it's less than $13.

    http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh.../dp/B0012TDR9E
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    No matter what level of showing you're doing, you are required to have pants on.


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  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2005
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    Rochester, NY
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    Default

    I just bought one of those cheap, small food scales at the local grocery store to weigh my horses grain in. Can really only fit just over a pound of grain, but my horses at home don't get a lot and it really doesn't take a long time to measure out a few pounds.
    <3 Vinnie <3
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    Jackie's Punt ("Bailey") My Finger Lakes Finest Thoroughbred



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2014
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    1

    Default

    I am also looking for a new scale to measure the Diets but don't know any company that offering really cheap rates for their food scales. My old scale have some faults that's why i am going to buy a new one with cheap rates and multiple features.
    Last edited by Edwin; Jan. 29, 2014 at 01:29 AM.



  19. #19
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    Apr. 13, 2008
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    NY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by retrofit View Post
    Put a measured amount in a lightweight plastic bag (i.e. the type you put produce in) and weigh it at the supermarket.

    For old-school pellets & sweet feed, 1 quart is approximately equal to 1 lb.

    I'm sure this doesn't hold true for many of the new formulations.
    This is what I do! PSA: feed like Ultium, Omolene 500, etc, are by weight heavier than their same volume cousins like BS Sentinel, Strider, etc.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2007
    Location
    NC
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    Default

    Hanging scales make a lot of sense for weighing hay bags, flakes, etc, but a shipping scale with a platform with remote display* usually has a much larger capacity and design that makes it much more useful for hard feeds and everything else, even hay bales and just general use. I use the h*ll out of mine for all sorts of things. $40 bucks will get you this 200 pounder at Sam's Club and I'm sure Costco, etc, has similar options.

    http://www.samsclub.com/sams/shippin...prod7590375.ip

    If you feel like searching through the 5 million scales like this on ebay, you can score one even cheaper and look for larger platforms, capacities, etc, at similar bargain prices. Probably some good deals on Amazon, too. But you can get a lot for your money if you don't sorting through results on ebay; some are from USA sellers, others from China or other international places. Good deals and usually only take a week or two extra time to arrive, but harder to return if defective, etc. If you go the Sam's Club or similar big box store option, at least you know you can take it back to them, fast and without a hassle, if it doesn't work out.

    *The key is the remote, detached display so you can put bulky items on the scale and actually see what it says! Very awkward or even impossible to read the display when it is down there on the scale itself and totally covered by the big bucket, box, hay bale, whatever.



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