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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California
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    4,209

    Cool Vent: First time horse owner = clueless = Poor Horse!!

    First time horse owner brings her new horse to a huge pasture with 8 other horses, one of which is mine, who moved in earlier this month.

    There is a small pen in the pasture in which the new horse can go while the resident horses get to know it. I had my horse in there for about 5 hours and after careful monitoring, felt comfortable letting her out and her transition was seamless.

    Last Sunday, new horse owner comes with her 17 year old retired jumper who she bought for hacking and trail rides. She puts the horse in the pen, and leaves for dinner without seeing how her horse or the herd are interacting with each other.

    Returns after a couple of hours to find her horse at the front of the pasture, big bite wound on her side and 3-legged lame. Leg is swollen. She has the vet come out and is told to wrap, ice and stall rest for swelling as well as give bute. Five days later, poor horse is still 3-legged lame and new owner is learning first aid techniques, wrapping and trying to figure out best way to ice. Doesn't really ask for help and seems unwilling to accept suggestions from more experienced people.

    They did not ultrasound, x-ray or anything to determine what type of injury it may be.

    Turns out she did not vet check the horse, so she has no idea what prior injuries horse may have had in it's long career as a jumper. She called the previous owner, and that owner had also not vet checked, so is of no help.

    I feel badly for the girl, its her first horse and she has no idea if and when she will ever be able to ride, because she has no idea what type of injury she is dealing with!

    Moving from pasture to stall is going to cost her $400 more a month, and she is trying not to have a big vet bill. I feel so sorry for the mare as she is a sweetheart. I feel badly she is with a clueless owner who is trying not to spend to much money and can only jingle the horse recovers and does not have to be euthanized.

    I know I'm preaching to the choir, but why do clueless people buy horses? (Rhetorical question)

    Just had to get this off my chest. Ugh.
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,329

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    Just more lacking horsemanship. If there were more educated people (ethical?) the sellers would have performed a PPE on the prospective buyer and realized they had no mentor.

    I'm just shocked this noob had the sense to see horse was lame and hired a vet.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2011
    Location
    Lisbon, Portugal
    Posts
    1,451

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    Not to steal your thread but it's not only clueless owners who do this sort of thing. The owner of the horse I'm leasing who is also the BO did this last week and I found my horse with several cuts and bite marks when i arrived to get him ready for my lesson. WTF?? He is WAY more experienced than me and yet he put a horse in a small pasture with 2 other horses for the first time unsupervised?? Luckily there were no serious injuries, just some nasty cuts an bites. If thins had been worse and we needed a vet i would have been tempted to tell him since he din't bother to tell anything before putting the horse in the pasture with 2 more geldings he should be the one paying the vet bill alone.

    Back to the OP, I suppose the clueless owner will have to learn about horse care the hard way. I just hope the horse isn't the one to pay the price.
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that to be a problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by DottieHQ View Post
    You're just jealous because you lack my extensive koalafications.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,525

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    It's not a matter of clueless people buying horses (we're not all clueless, are we?)...it's just a matter of new owners being clueless. Best thing to do is reach out and help her. I'm sorry she didn't have a barn owner or new barn mate tell her the best way to introduce her horse to the herd.

    I never had to take a test before buying my first horse - I had to learn a lot of lessons the hard way. Come to think of it, I'm still learning .

    Hope the horse is okay.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Posts
    2,310

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    Give the woman a break. She just bought a horse and has to deal with a lot more than expected. (oh, I forgot we are supposed to plan for the absolute worst when buying a horse, and not enjoy the moment) Besides that it sounds like the other boarders might be a bit condescending or unknowingly hostile.

    Glad to know some folks knew everything when they bought their first horse.

    Me, I had a good education and still didn't know jack.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California
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    4,209

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sansena View Post
    Just more lacking horsemanship. If there were more educated people (ethical?) the sellers would have performed a PPE on the prospective buyer and realized they had no mentor.

    I'm just shocked this noob had the sense to see horse was lame and hired a vet.
    She did have a friend with her so at least she had some support. I can see if someone is in a hurry to sell a horse they may believe that if the buyer is a decent rider, they must also know basic horse care.

    Quote Originally Posted by hundredacres View Post
    It's not a matter of clueless people buying horses (we're not all clueless, are we?)...it's just a matter of new owners being clueless. Best thing to do is reach out and help her. I'm sorry she didn't have a barn owner or new barn mate tell her the best way to introduce her horse to the herd.

    I never had to take a test before buying my first horse - I had to learn a lot of lessons the hard way. Come to think of it, I'm still learning .

    Hope the horse is okay.
    The barn management very clearly explains how to handle introducing a new horse to the herd. The friend who was with her used to have a horse in that pasture and there were also people there she could have asked if she had any reservations.

    Quote Originally Posted by red mares View Post
    Give the woman a break. She just bought a horse and has to deal with a lot more than expected. (oh, I forgot we are supposed to plan for the absolute worst when buying a horse, and not enjoy the moment) Besides that it sounds like the other boarders might be a bit condescending or unknowingly hostile.

    Glad to know some folks knew everything when they bought their first horse.

    Me, I had a good education and still didn't know jack.
    My goodness, it sure didn't take long for a snarky post to come along. Then again, this is COTH...

    None of the other boarders have been even a little bit condescending or hostile. Everyone has been really supportive. I offered to loan her my ice horse ice boots to help with the icing, but she wanted to "borrow" ice packs from work and figure out how to get them to stay on with wraps. She isn't asking for help from more experienced people and isn't too open to offers of help.

    I don't claim to have known everything when I was a new horse owner, but at least I had the common sense to figure out which other owners I could lean on for support.

    She chose not to follow suggestions of other boarders and monitor her horse because she felt because the horse was older it would not have any issues.

    I feel badly for her and even more so for the horse.
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
    Posts
    1,262

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    What does a PPE (or lack of one) have to do with this lameness which is obviously the result of a incident that just happened? You could have a perfect bill of health on day- and a broken leg dangling the next...

    "OMG my horse jumped a fence and just got hit by a semi!"... (snark) "Well that will show you to not get a PPE."



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Posts
    2,310

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    Quote Originally Posted by jenm View Post
    My goodness, it sure didn't take long for a snarky post to come along. Then again, this is COTH...
    I took the OP's initial post as snarky and condscending to someone who is dealing with quite a bit as newbee. I hoped that she and her barnmates were nicer than her initial post, but based on how & what was posted, I wouldn't have been inclined to ask the OP for help either.

    I thought the snark about the (ethical) sellers was uncalled for. That seller found a non-jumping home for a retired horse, isn't that what they are supposed to do? Oh, they just took a check from someone who was going to decent (again assuming) boarding barn instead of getting deep into the buyer's business like some over zealous rescue.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
    Posts
    904

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    Don't most barn owners oversee the introduction of a new horse? That's been my experience. I've never been at a barn where the owner was left to do this on their own. Horse owner moves horse in, barn owner figures out where it may fit and introduces over a fence, whatever and supervises.

    Seriously, is this the norm? I don't think I'd keep my horse at a barn that ran this way. New horse/owner show up and are expected to introduce the horse to MY horse's herd, knowing nothing about the 'personalities' of the horses, etc.?

    I think I've only been present once when my horse was introduced to a new turnout situation. Granted, I haven't moved that many times...



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2009
    Posts
    800

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    I also feel for the new owner, giving another positive thought against all this negative. Thank goodness that the retired jumper found a home and wasn't shipped to auction, I mean slaughter and beat up in the trailer by stallions

    Quote Originally Posted by red mares View Post
    Give the woman a break. She just bought a horse and has to deal with a lot more than expected. (oh, I forgot we are supposed to plan for the absolute worst when buying a horse, and not enjoy the moment) Besides that it sounds like the other boarders might be a bit condescending or unknowingly hostile.

    Glad to know some folks knew everything when they bought their first horse.

    Me, I had a good education and still didn't know jack.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    5,039

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    The other day I was trying to get up on my horse to ride bareback. So there I was trying to swing a leg over, getting stuck, horse swinging his butt away from the step up, etc. All I could think was, wow, somebody somewhere is paying attention to this and I will likely end up the butt of someone's snark on YouTube or a forum somewhere.

    Then I thought; know what? Karma's a bitch. If anyone is going to get a kick out of outing me trying with little grace to get on my horse, sooner or later that person will be in a situation feeling exposed, conspicuous, and not at all graceful, and worried that someone, somewhere, witnessing his ineptitude will post some snarky video or discussion thread to that effect.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2012
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA
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    12

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    I am pretty new to these forums and really only got on to ask a lot of questions about my new barn and had some barn renovation questions but this "NEW POST" got me interested; so I read them all.

    There will always be two types of people, ones that want to vent and those that hate them for doing it. But there are always two sides to every story too. I do have to say, right out of the starting gate, that even though I too love to vent and I actually think it is healthy to some degree... I would not be posting rants/raves and venting on a public forum unless it is all 100% anonymous. You never know who is watching and although your intentions may be totally honest and positive in nature not every one will see it that way, period. It could get back to the person you said this about and you may never even know what hit you. I have been blindsided like this on Facebook and it was out of people assuming my comments meant something and that it was about them and in reality... it wasn't at all. I just want to try and save you trouble down the road because stuff like this usually always ends badly and not the way you expected or intended it to.

    In regards to the OP though, I feel your frustration but at the same time just place yourself in her shoes as she is probably overwhelmed and never got the opportunity to really enjoy her horse at all, not to mention, her first real horse! I would have been devastated! Just try and be as supportive as possible even though she is being distant and not wanting any advice or help. Who knows, maybe she feels stupid and ignorant for letting this happen and now everyone knows she didn't do a PPE either. I would say give both her and the horse a little time, no matter how frustrating it may be. Its super hard to make new friends at a new barn but even harder to make them in the midst of chaos! She doesn't know all of you at all and is just putting up walls to protect herself. If you just keep being polite and not forcing your opinions on her... she may just come around.

    In regards to a PPE... I would have never done one either on a retired horse especially if the owner was very honest and clear about the horse and its use/history. Granted, it depends on how much I was paying for the horse and my impression of the current owners. Why would the seller do a PPE FOR a prospective owner, I have NEVER heard of that?! It is the sole obligation of the buyer to setup and pay for a PPE with a reputable vet of their choosing (I would know this as I am a vet student). There is ALWAYS a risk in horses even with a PPE and that should not dictate why you decide to purchase. There are even things that could crop up in a PPE that would not raise a flag or deter someone from a purchase if all they were going to do was light trail ride once a week or even less than that. We all have different jobs/expectations for our horses and we have to respect that. A million dollar horse could vet perfect one day and get hit by a car or colic and die the next... that's life with horses for ya!

    One of the others that replied had a good question though: Why on earth would a barn where you are a paying boarder, leave introducing your own horse into a pasture where you don't know any of the horses personalities and how they may react to the new owner/boarder's horse!? That is 100% up to the owner of the barn to get not only involved in it but mostly execute. That is really bad barn management! I have been in boarding facilities all over the US and since I was 4 years old, as we are military (only recently did we purchase our own farm in Virginia Beach) and no owner or manager would have ever been caught dead doing that. I would question this facility.

    Good luck with your new boarder and just try to remember that she may be having a really tough time in life right now and maybe not JUST with her equine life. Some people just need extra compassion even when they seem like they are being unruly. You may find a good friend down the road if you continue to smile, be polite and give her some time =)
    Jodi Register
    Flying *R* Farm
    "Being happy doesn't mean that everything is perfect. It means you have decided to look beyond the imperfections."



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    2,732

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    I was clueless when I got my first horse. I just knew I LOVED them.
    Free bar.ka and tidy rabbit.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2012
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    92

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    Quote Originally Posted by jenm View Post
    First time horse owner brings her new horse to a huge pasture with 8 other horses, one of which is mine, who moved in earlier this month.

    There is a small pen in the pasture in which the new horse can go while the resident horses get to know it. I had my horse in there for about 5 hours and after careful monitoring, felt comfortable letting her out and her transition was seamless.

    Last Sunday, new horse owner comes with her 17 year old retired jumper who she bought for hacking and trail rides. She puts the horse in the pen, and leaves for dinner without seeing how her horse or the herd are interacting with each other.

    Returns after a couple of hours to find her horse at the front of the pasture, big bite wound on her side and 3-legged lame. Leg is swollen. She has the vet come out and is told to wrap, ice and stall rest for swelling as well as give bute. Five days later, poor horse is still 3-legged lame and new owner is learning first aid techniques, wrapping and trying to figure out best way to ice. Doesn't really ask for help and seems unwilling to accept suggestions from more experienced people.

    They did not ultrasound, x-ray or anything to determine what type of injury it may be.

    Turns out she did not vet check the horse, so she has no idea what prior injuries horse may have had in it's long career as a jumper. She called the previous owner, and that owner had also not vet checked, so is of no help.

    I feel badly for the girl, its her first horse and she has no idea if and when she will ever be able to ride, because she has no idea what type of injury she is dealing with!

    Moving from pasture to stall is going to cost her $400 more a month, and she is trying not to have a big vet bill. I feel so sorry for the mare as she is a sweetheart. I feel badly she is with a clueless owner who is trying not to spend to much money and can only jingle the horse recovers and does not have to be euthanized.

    I know I'm preaching to the choir, but why do clueless people buy horses? (Rhetorical question)

    Just had to get this off my chest. Ugh.
    Really- IMHO BO should have managed introduction of new horse to the herd. Especially in light of the newbie status. BO should have evaluated the new resident to safely place.. That is what I do-its my job as BO- to ensure the safety of my charges.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2003
    Posts
    3,589

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    Where the heck was the BO/BM? How totally irresponsible of the BO/BM not to watch out for the wellbeing of all of his/her boarders. It's crazy that a boarder is allowed to work out an appropriate time to release their horse (or not release as was this case) into the pasture. What about quarantine?

    If I was selling a horse I wouldn't look for the buyers to have any great knowledge of horse care if they were planning on boarding said horse at a reputable barn.

    Having said that, I went and bought a horse when I was 17 and my parents were off on holiday. I have no experience whatsoever and the horse seemed to fare pretty well being turned out in a big pasture and me muddling through what it needed and didn't. I think sometimes we forget that horses managed just fine before we started interfering with them.

    Glad she got the vet and hope the horse gets better soon.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    39,989

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pa Rural View Post
    Really- IMHO BO should have managed introduction of new horse to the herd. Especially in light of the newbie status. BO should have evaluated the new resident to safely place.. That is what I do-its my job as BO- to ensure the safety of my charges.
    Right.
    How would this thread read if the new horse had injured some of the horses already boarded there?
    Think about that.

    The fault here seems to be the management was asleep.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2001
    Location
    Nashville, TN USA
    Posts
    1,158

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    AS a BO, I will not allow someone to throw a horse on the the pasture without at least 2 days of associating over the fence. And if the owner does not know better, I kindly explain it to them. And if the new owner is totally clueless, I kindly talk to them about how clueless they appear to be and try to educate them for the sake of their horse and themselves. And the safety of everyone on the farm.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2012
    Posts
    93

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    Quote Originally Posted by chemteach View Post
    I was clueless when I got my first horse. I just knew I LOVED them.
    Me too. I've done alot of dumb things. Did something dumb just a few days ago. Thankfully no real serious consequences from any of my learning experiences. Problem is people don't know what they don't know. The thing is to be kind and helpful. I still remember this witchy girl yelling at me in college when I made a mistake. She was raised with horses and probably could have shown me alot. Instead I avoided her like the plague. I did learn how not to behave from her.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2008
    Posts
    2,291

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    Quote Originally Posted by jenm View Post
    She puts the horse in the pen, and leaves for dinner without seeing how her horse or the herd are interacting with each other.

    Returns after a couple of hours to find her horse at the front of the pasture
    I don't get what she did that was so dumb. She put the horse in the pen. Did she need to stand there for the two hours? I might not have stood there the whole time myself. How did the horse get out of the pen?



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
    Location
    Orygun
    Posts
    2,861

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    The other day I was trying to get up on my horse to ride bareback. So there I was trying to swing a leg over, getting stuck, horse swinging his butt away from the step up, etc. All I could think was, wow, somebody somewhere is paying attention to this and I will likely end up the butt of someone's snark on YouTube or a forum somewhere.

    Hijack alert! Have you seen the comic strip on FB of the horse named Fergus and how he thwarts his rider?? So true and hilarious!

    Then I thought; know what? Karma's a bitch. If anyone is going to get a kick out of outing me trying with little grace to get on my horse, sooner or later that person will be in a situation feeling exposed, conspicuous, and not at all graceful, and worried that someone, somewhere, witnessing his ineptitude will post some snarky video or discussion thread to that effect.

    Paula
    :-)
    GR24's Musing #18 - More a reminder than a muse, on the first of the month, do your boob check for any lumps or differences.



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