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  1. #21
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    May. 24, 2006
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    Do not give Ivermectin to a collie mix unless you want a lawsuit when the dog ends up dead...offer to take the pet in yourself to a vet.



  2. #22
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    The only way to treat dermodex mange in a collie, that I know of, is to use Interceptor daily. Of course, it's out of production. The rescue I work with has been ordering it from Australia.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  3. #23
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    The dog needs to be diagnosed. You think the dog has mange but you can be wrong because you are not trained in diagnosis and haven't done a skin scraping (for example) to actually diagnose the dog. Don't try to treat a disease the dog may or may not have
    well, my experience, the vets usually diagnose mange by the characteristic hair-loss pattern. Usually it starts in the armpit/chest area and spreads from there. If your hairloss has a different pattern, or isn't intensely itchy, I'd think it was probably something other than mange. Then they confirm the diagnosis by a trial of treatment- if the dog responds, it was mange. We have a lot of mange cases around here because the foxes carry it.

    I paste in below a good blurb about it:

    How is canine scabies diagnosed?

    Trying to make a diagnosis of canine scabies can be very frustrating. The standard method is to perform a skin scraping and then identify the mite under the microscope. Unfortunately, on average, only twenty percent of the infected dogs will show Sarcoptes mites on any given scraping. Therefore, if a dog has a positive skin scraping, the diagnosis is confirmed but a negative scraping does not rule out sarcoptic mange. Therefore, most diagnoses are made based on history and response to treatment for scabies.

    How is scabies treated?

    There are several ways to treat scabies. In the past, the most effective treatment had been to clip the dog if he had long hair, bathe him with a benzoyl peroxide shampoo to cleanse the skin, and then apply an organophosphate dip (Paramite). Amitraz dips and Mitaban (also organophosphates), and lime sulfur dips (Lymdip) have also been used effectively. The dogs are usually dipped once every two weeks for two to three times. While effective, these dips are very unpleasant to apply for both the owner and the dog. Because the dip must come in contact with the mites and many mites live on the face and ears of dogs, great care must be exercised when applying these dips to these sensitive areas. The dips can be toxic to humans and are not suitable for very young, old, or debilitated animals. In addition, there are some reported cases of resistance to these dips in some cases of sarcoptic mange.

    Fortunately, there are several other products that have been extremely effective, safe, and convenient in treating sarcoptic mange. Selamectin (Revolution) is a topical solution that is applied once a month and also provides heartworm prevention, flea control, some tick protection and protection against Sarcoptic mange. Frontline Plus, Frontline Top Spot, and Frontline Spray are also labelled for use as aids in controlling sarcoptic mange. Liquid ivermectin is an off label alternative that is sometimes used. It is used at much higher concentrations than are found in heartworm preventives (e.g., Heartgard). Ivermectin should not be used in Collies or Shetland sheep dogs and should be used with caution in the herding breeds. In dogs that are sensitive to ivermectin, some veterinarians have been having success using milbemycin oxime (Interceptor) at an off-label dose. All of these products should only be used under direct veterinary supervision and care.

    In addition to treating the dog, the environment such as the dog's bedding can be treated with a residual insecticide. Since Sarcoptes scabiei is easily transmitted between animals, all dogs in contact with an infected animal should also be treated. Because of the length of the life cycle and ability of the mite to live off of the animal, treatment must continue for a minimum of 4 weeks.

    Because of the damage to the skin in sarcoptic mange, many dogs also have bacterial and or yeast infections. These need to be treated as well.



  4. #24
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    Jul. 21, 2006
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    South Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    Some collies have a genetic sensitivity to Ivermectin which can be life threatening. It's very common in Rough Collies, not so common in Border Collies. Some other herding breeds too, I think. Short of genetic testing, my vet tells me it's better to just avoid it in herding mutts and other suspects for collie heritage if there are alternative medications. .
    No purebred border collies have been identified with the mutation that causes sensitivity to avermectins. And there really aren't alternatives, since all the HW preventatives currently on the market belong to the same class of drugs. Here's a very informative link on the subject for those interested in learning more.

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    The only way to treat dermodex mange in a collie, that I know of, is to use Interceptor daily. Of course, it's out of production. The rescue I work with has been ordering it from Australia.
    I didn't realize Interceptor was no longer being manufactured. But anyway, I'd be scared to use it in a dog who was not confirmed HW negative. Milbemycin oxime causes mass microfilarial die-off (not gradual as in prophylactic doses of ivermectin) which can cause anaphylactic shock. I nearly learned this the hard way with a rescue.



  5. #25
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    I worked with a lady whose Husky had mange. I tried telling her after seeing pics that it needed to have a skin scraping done. Vet never did, tried a bunch of other "treatments" instead, none of which were for mange. Eventually, my co-worker was covered with it, adn that's when they figured it out.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  6. #26
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    Nov. 3, 2006
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    Maine
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    Report to animal control for neglect. Usually if the person follows up with veterinary care no charges are pressed



  7. #27
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    I would also be afraid to use ivermectin since you don't know if the dog could have heartworms. Could you offer to give the dog and owner a ride to a local shelter related clinic? I suspect money is a problem, as well as the anxiety that goes along with not having enough money to properly care for the dog. If the owner is reluctant, you could talk with the rescue that gave her the dog. They might make a tactful call and offer to help her get to a vet or clinic who they use.



  8. #28
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' View Post
    No purebred border collies have been identified with the mutation that causes sensitivity to avermectins. And there really aren't alternatives, since all the HW preventatives currently on the market belong to the same class of drugs. Here's a very informative link on the subject for those interested in learning more.



    I didn't realize Interceptor was no longer being manufactured. But anyway, I'd be scared to use it in a dog who was not confirmed HW negative. Milbemycin oxime causes mass microfilarial die-off (not gradual as in prophylactic doses of ivermectin) which can cause anaphylactic shock. I nearly learned this the hard way with a rescue.
    Yes, we test for HW first, of course.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  9. #29
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    May. 4, 2003
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    Canada
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    Thank you all for your kind advice.

    As I said before, I can use doggy diplomacy rather than rushing off to
    call animal control on this poor, kind lady. I do not think that should be a first response, at all, and I am more than capable to usng my moral courage if I have to. Would not bother me at all and I have stepped up before and lost a friend to boot!
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  10. #30
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    Mar. 9, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    I worked with a lady whose Husky had mange. I tried telling her after seeing pics that it needed to have a skin scraping done. Vet never did, tried a bunch of other "treatments" instead, none of which were for mange. Eventually, my co-worker was covered with it, adn that's when they figured it out.

    My dog had two separate "negative" skin scrapings, all the while having basically a football sized itchy hairless area on his rump, which actually was mange. I ended up spending a fortune treatiing all the things it was NOT before my kids got scabies from the dog. ;(
    "You can't blame other people. You can't always say what happened wasn't my fault, and you know what? Even if you have an excuse, shut up. "Bruce Davidson Sr.



  11. #31
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    May. 4, 2003
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    Canada
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    There is another thread about hot spots - the two should be linked...I'm thinking. I've dealt with hot spots before, by using Betadine shampoo two or three times at weekly intervals.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  12. #32
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    Jun. 7, 2005
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    Rochester, NY
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    I hope the owner finally did the right thing, and took poor pup to the vet.

    2 out of 3 of our dogs got mange this summer. We saw a fox around our woods for a few weeks, and I'm sure my mischievous Border Collie/Cattle Dog had a run in with it.

    Her poor ear was a bloody mess within just a couple of days from scratching. Our lab/husky also went crazy scratching.

    The vet gave us Revolution to use, since our one dog has collie in her. Used it every 2 weeks for a total of 3 uses. Also treated our Lab/Husky with the same treatment, as well as our Pitt/Lab (even though she didn't show symptoms, it's contagious!)

    They are all fine now, and luckily the hair has grown back on both dogs ears. I can't imagine not taking them to the vet for something like mange...at the very least for us humans own peace of mind (I mean, ick, mange!).
    <3 Vinnie <3
    1992-2010
    Jackie's Punt ("Bailey") My Finger Lakes Finest Thoroughbred



  13. #33
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    Mar. 26, 2006
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    Just wanted to point out that it may not, in fact, be mange. Here's a shot of my GSD upon arrival at the barn:

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...type=3&theater

    Thought for sure that was mange. Turned out it was hair loss caused by hypothyroidism, coupled with a yeast infection. (and OMG, the stench!!!) The bilateral hair loss and the "sad affect" on the face are both symptoms of low thyroid hormone.



  14. #34
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunsets View Post
    Just wanted to point out that it may not, in fact, be mange.
    my first thought when I read this thread

    - glad your GSD is getting treated



  15. #35
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    Mar. 26, 2006
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    Thanks, alto.

    He's way better now. Took about 3 months until he started looking more like a GSD and less like a giant mutant Chinese Crested.

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...type=3&theater



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