The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 59
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    19,075

    Default taking the PLUNGE -- Dived in and survived! Report P.2

    I completely lost my nerve for riding alone about two years ago. Lost part of it when my rotator cuff was ruptured, then lost more when I fell and was dragged, and lost another bit when the saddle slipped and I hit the ground. My age and no riding companions just stopped my riding, although I still own horses that are getting little or no work.

    Well, darn it, I've decided it's time to get back in the saddle again. So I've found an eventing barn only 60 miles away that has schoolies and specializes in beginners. Will have a diagnostic lesson on Friday, Isaac permitting. I figure a couple of months or more of flatwork on beginner horses with someone who does kids might get my confidence back; then I'll look into training board for one of mine and lessons on her. A month or so of no stirrup work at the walk, moving to the trot, then to stirrups.

    Sounds like a plan, no?

    I CAN DO THIS.
    Last edited by vineyridge; Sep. 7, 2012 at 05:45 PM.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2009
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Good for you!!!

    Making the plan is the first and biggest step. Then sharing your goals with others to so we can support and encourage you is the second. Sounds like your on the right track!
    Keep everyone posted on your progress. Just remember the great times you had riding in the past, the relationships you had with your horses, the euphoria of those elusive ah ha! moments but most of all be gentle with yourself. Give yourself permission to go slow. And remember trust is easily lost and slow to rebuild but it will happen!!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
    Posts
    426

    Default

    Wonderful! You are a very brave woman with an intelligent plan. Good luck and have fun!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2006
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,303

    Default

    That's exciting! Congratulations!!
    We're spending our money on horses and bourbon. The rest we're just wasting.
    www.dleestudio.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2010
    Posts
    146

    Default

    Sound like a really good, solid plan Have fun!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2001
    Location
    Parker, Colorado
    Posts
    2,695

    Default

    Atta girl!!!
    where are we going, and why am I in this hand basket?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Congrats on getting back in the saddle. Yes you can do this
    I am on my phone 90% of the time. Please ignore typos, misplaced lower case letters, and the random word butchered by autocowreck.




  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,664

    Default

    That is AWESOME. Congrats! You can do this--and you will ROCK this



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Location
    Saco, Maine
    Posts
    4,729

    Default

    Oh! You must be so nervous and excited! Making that first appointment was a HUGE step! Please keep us posted!! It takes ages to get the confidence back. I'm still working on it and the horse who shattered mine has been dead for 6 years!!! Have fun, Viney!
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 1999
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,465

    Default

    welcome back



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,331

    Default

    I'm not sure if you have a quiet one to trail ride on but that is what helped me really get back into the swing of things. I joined a local trail riding club. The low key "who cares what you look like" atmosphere made me much more relaxed.

    Now I'm up to taking lessons, going to clinics and going to local shows. I'm taking my guy to his first 3 phase in a couple of weeks - yay!!

    Good luck to you!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2007
    Location
    Upper and Lower Canada
    Posts
    2,912

    Default

    That's terrific! Here's to the real confidence builders that restore our trust... they're out there!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    5,030

    Default

    Great plan!

    Regain your riding form in a controlled environment. Then you will be able to deal with the silly stuff all of our ponies are prone to do. It really helped me
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2007
    Location
    too far from the barn
    Posts
    5,715

    Default

    sounds like a great plan, looking forward to hearing updates on the progress
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,873

    Cool THIS !!!! IS "HAPPY" ~ So glad to read about your plan !

    "THIS" is HAPPY !!!!

    Not an easy assignment but ```

    "WE" ALL know you can do this and will be "back" ```
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    19,075

    Default

    Scary things look a lot scarier when you're 65. If all goes well, I hope to do a weenie event next year.

    Thanks for all the encouragement. My mantra will be I CAN DO THIS!
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2012
    Posts
    1,961

    Default

    I'm really pulling for you--good school horses and an understanding instructor might be able to restore your confidence faster than you think. I, also, had a crisis of nerve about 10 years ago; and being a professional, that really sucked. I'd set my entire life up around being able to have nice horses, and suddenly I was making excuses to do laundry instead of ride! It had a lot to do with a chain of hairy near-misses involving 2 very dangerous horses in a row that I wound up owning and trying to "fix."

    I was relating quite a lot to that scene in "Top Gun" where the pilot throws his wings insignia down on the CO's table and says, "Sorry, sir, I've lost the edge!" For a long time I would only do very mild stuff on a succession of semi-retired old packers; and hated myself for having become one of the Old Ladies On The Buckle I'd thought pathetic in my fire-eating eventer days.

    Then I had the opportunity (practically a gift!) to buy a very nice weanling. Could I really contemplate riding babies again?
    Would the same horror of spinning and bolting on the road happen again, would I ruin her through my lack of nerve? As she grew I did a lot of agonizing, then studying, then working progressively on REGAINING my nerve systematically; and also engaged someone who did it every day to be the First One Up when fillyfoal's time to start came! When we came together under saddle at last, it felt like having my old eventer back--without a lot of his difficulties. On the strength of this, bought another youngster, gaited horse this time, and have been enjoying the heck out of him every day too.

    Was it worth it? Absolutely! Is it difficult to overcome old memories of mayhem? You better believe it! One book that helped me tremendously wasn't about horses at all--it was Col. Grossman's "On Combat." He takes you through every high-stress scenario common to police and soldiers and gives you very systematic and effective tools for controlling your mind and body so you can FUNCTION and not get in your own way. It's a matter of "reprogramming" and it WORKS. Just knowing the difference between an adrenaline dump and "cowardice" makes all the difference in the world! Just plan the ride, then ride the plan.

    My youngsters and I are making adventures and wet saddle pads together in rough open country, most days alone and loving it, and you can do it too--throw the "Four Feathers" to the wind, screw down that old Caliente and kick on!

    Best of Luck!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2008
    Posts
    1,144

    Default

    I think you should contact Leslie Stevenson about blogging this. My deepest respects.....it would be nice to hear how you do.....

    If only.
    May the sun shine on you daily, and your worries be gone with the wind.
    www.mmceventing.com



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2006
    Location
    North Central Florida
    Posts
    1,380

    Default

    Yay Viney!!

    As someone who has also "had a crisis of nerve" as SwampYankee so eloquently put it, I applaud you in your efforts and look forward to many updates!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2012
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Hooray!

    A good day in the saddle beats the best days on the ground.

    Congrats :-)
    "We sleep safely at night because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would harm us.” - Winston Churchill



Similar Threads

  1. Taking The Plunge...buying a trailer. Which one?
    By Neigh-Neigh in forum Eventing
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: Oct. 17, 2012, 07:18 PM
  2. Taking the plunge(into dressage)
    By Rangergirl56m in forum Dressage
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Feb. 24, 2011, 04:54 PM
  3. Replies: 17
    Last Post: Feb. 5, 2011, 11:45 PM
  4. Replies: 13
    Last Post: Aug. 18, 2010, 12:13 AM
  5. Taking the plunge (again)... should I?
    By littleum in forum Off Course
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Jan. 10, 2009, 09:34 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •