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  1. #1
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Question More suggestions for arena footing please......

    I have done some searches and none really fit my problem. We live on the east side of a river. Our entire place is DEEP, DEEP, DEEP in river sand. I have leveled an area 100 x 200 and I want to add "something" to the top that will be firm enough to ride young horses and dressage type riding, not really any jumpng.
    The sand base is literally "never ending deep", so taking sand away is not an option.
    What will work on top that won't get instantly gobbled up by the sand base from riding and general arena grading to keep it level?
    And how deep should that substance need to be?
    Most of what is available to us locally is top soil and Ga clay. Anthing else would have to be bought and trucked in, but that is an option to make it work.
    Water being available to the riding area is not a problem.
    Any suggestions before I spend the money for the wrong thing would be appreciated.
    TIA!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
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    5,680

    Default

    Eurofelt.

    It helps keep the surface stable and not too deep. That said, the arena I know with it does not have a deep sand base, but I do know it is supposed to help stablity.
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  3. #3
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Default Thanks Apps

    I'll do some research on the Eurofelt. I'm not familiar with it. Do any of you Florida folks have any ideas?



  4. #4
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    Mar. 24, 2012
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    Default

    I replied on dressage forum. Your issue is the base, not what goes on top.



  5. #5
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    Nov. 27, 2011
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    My Little Bit of Heaven
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    I replied on dressage forum. Your issue is the base, not what goes on top.
    Ditto this unfortunately. The base you are describing is the worst possible for building an arena with one of the modern types of footing.

    A solution might be to go for a grass arena; add black dirt and grow grass, which will stabilize the surface but only to the extent that the grass is well maintained and stays thick and healthy.



  6. #6
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Appsolute View Post
    Eurofelt.

    It helps keep the surface stable and not too deep. That said, the arena I know with it does not have a deep sand base, but I do know it is supposed to help stablity.
    Is that the same as GGT? Especially if kept moist it does tend to knit the footing together
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  7. #7
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    May. 21, 2008
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    Sonoma County, California
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    I replied on dressage forum. Your issue is the base, not what goes on top.
    This.

    Your base is your foundation and without a stable foundation what goes on top will also be unstable.

    Are there any other arenas in your area? Maybe see how other people have sited and built their arenas if you are in an area that is really sandy. Or talk to a contractor who builds arenas.

    Here is a really great article that talks about arena footing: pubs.cas.psu.edu/freepubs/pdfs/ub038.pdf



  8. #8
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    Feb. 28, 2008
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    Default

    This isn't the most glamorous solution but where I board we have "endless" sugar sand and the BO solves this by spreading stall muckings in the arena and on the training track. Since its such deep sand, it never holds any water and so it never gets slick or mucky. Does a great job actually, its quite nice to ride/drive on.

    Horses on the farm live out though 24/7, and very few of us use shavings/bedding, so the muckings are primarily manure/hay, not shavings/straw.
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  9. #9
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Default Aleady tried the grass route too.....

    It does help but as you can imagine, it is very hard to maintain with high traffic. Also, the ruts in certain areas are hard to maintain and keep level...and keep the grass growing. I even bought a heavy roller and that did not work either. The sand is just not that good for growing grass when it is constantly being ridden on. Ga Clay can be quite sticky, I am considering mixing it in as a base and see how that works. I did buy the USDF booklet, so maybe that will have some more ideas specific to our area problem. Unfortunately, I am the only one in my area (we own all the way to the river edge) that has horses, so I don't have anyone that has tried to make this work close by. Thanks again!



  10. #10
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Default I have been doing that too, Buck22

    .......and it has helped, but I only have 1-3 horses in part time, so at the rate I am going, I will be 92+ years old, maybe, before I begin to make any real headway with that . I think I will keep doing it when I add in the clay though......if that is the way we decide to go.



  11. #11
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    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
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    Default

    I have clay underneath with small peebles on top very small pebbles with sand on top. Maybe try putting down a thick coat of ga clay with some small pebbles and topping it back in sand. The only thing is you need to grade the arena when doing this so it drains well
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  12. #12
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Default Thanks

    We will be waiting for the hurricane to do it's thing next week and then get started after that.



  13. #13
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    Mar. 27, 2009
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    Upstate NY
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    Default

    I think no matter what you do you need to lay down some felt or eurofelt or landscaping felt to stableize the area, otherwise, anything you put down will only get mixed in, eventually and you will be right bac where you started in a year or two.

    You need a landscaping felt which is strong and stable to keep your footing from being mixed in, deeply. Remember, horse hooves can really dig up an area. Without it, you might as well go out with a shovel and hack away at it, that's how much each hoof dig is going to dig it up.
    Trainer's website - photos of my horse Airborne under About and Francesca Edwards also in media page 1

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  14. #14
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Smile I removed 8 inches of sand today

    from the top and leveled the area........and I'm awaiting Isaac to visit until we do the next step. Thanks!



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