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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2012
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    119

    Default Wire fencing, WHATS THE DIFFERENCE!?

    Putting up new fencing in a few weeks and of course shopping around for the best bang for my buck. I know it has to be 2x4 wire to be "horse safe".... but whats the difference in these two wire fencings besides the price? Either one better than the other? ( I realize one of the links is 60in and one is 48in)

    http://www.tractorsupply.com/non-cli...00-ft--3610692

    http://www.tractorsupply.com/horse-f...00-ft--3610715
    Tinker Toy & Blue Bonnett



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Collingwood,ON
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    1,405

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WARDen View Post
    Putting up new fencing in a few weeks and of course shopping around for the best bang for my buck. I know it has to be 2x4 wire to be "horse safe".... but whats the difference in these two wire fencings besides the price? Either one better than the other? ( I realize one of the links is 60in and one is 48in)

    http://www.tractorsupply.com/non-cli...00-ft--3610692

    http://www.tractorsupply.com/horse-f...00-ft--3610715
    I'm guessing that one is woven wire and one is welded. My understanding is that the woven wire is much safer for horses. If a horse impacts the welded wire and it breaks, there will be lots of nasty sharp points to get cut on.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 1999
    Location
    Ohio: Charter Member - COTH Hockey Clique & COTH Buffy Clique
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    9,156

    Default

    4" vertical spacing vs. 2" vertical spacing is the first thing that jumps out at me (besides the overall height of the fence).

    FWIW, I just put in $9K worth of fencing at my place. All of it is regular field mesh fencing -- smaller at the bottom (no way a hoof could get through it) and larger at the top. I love it. It was WAAAAAY cheaper than "no-climb" type fence and I feel confident it will do the job with horses without a problem. Plus I'm going to be adding 2 strands of electric tape -- one about and another about 2' from the ground) to keep the horses off the fence anyway.
    ************
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 28, 2010
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Red Brand is one of the most expensive brands of fencing you can buy. It looks like the size of the mesh is the same, the size of the wire is the same and it's woven the same. One roll is 4' tall and the other is 5' tall. If you can afford it go for the taller size. I bought fencing identical to Red Brands for about 2/3s the price.

    I agree with the person that said she put up electric wire also. My horses lean on the fence and have ripped it out of the wood posts whenever the electric tape is not working.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2012
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    119

    Default

    Where did you find the wire fencing for 2/3 of the cost of RedBrand??

    we plan to put a board on top with a hot wire.
    Tinker Toy & Blue Bonnett



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    13,961

    Default

    I will say from experience that the not welded type is worth it.

    I have a mare that (best we can tell from the damage we found when we got home from work) double barreled at one of the other horses and only encountered the no climb fencing at an elevation about 3'6" above the ground.
    Her legs went thru the fence. The cells pushed and contorted, the fence was a mess. The mare had no cuts. Which was a miracle with the condition the fence was in, top board ripped down, etc. If this fencing had welded connections I am thinking we would have ended up with lots of stitches.
    Last edited by trubandloki; Aug. 14, 2012 at 02:59 PM. Reason: Forgot the word 'no' in a very important place.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
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    6,346

    Default

    I know from heavy cattle fencing that even if they don't mess with it, in time, some of the welds will break and you have very sharp wire edges sticking out.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
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    1,912

    Default

    The biggest difference in the two links you posted is that one is 100' of fence and the other is 200'.

    Voice of experience: Unless you have a crew of experienced fence builders, you want the 100' roll.

    Both are class 1 galvanized. If you can find it, go for class 3 -- the coating is thicker and it will last longer.

    Here's their info on the galvanization, but I'm not sure if Red Brand actually has a class 3 galvanized horse fence: http://www.redbrand.com/FenceBasics/...tionGuide.aspx

    There are other brands. See what your locally owned feed store usually sells. I went with Beckaert fence wire, but I practically had to beg to get it -- they prefer to sell in semi tractor-trailer loads!
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
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    3,482

    Default

    I have used both the 100' and the 200' roll. 200' is heavy to work with and easier if you have more people. I would say DH and I are medium experienced at pulling no climb wire fencing but not professional by any stretch.
    I choose to always start and end a run on a post rather than splice two rolls together. It is easier for me and a skill I have no interest in learning. Big deal a potentially loose a couple of feet of usable fencing. Therefore I do prefer to use the 200' on a really long run and 100' on the short runs. So for our back dog yard we used some 200' rolls and some 100' rolls. But this is a paddock sized dog run not a huge pasture.
    DH and I have handled the 200' rolls by ourselves but the 100' rolls are much easier with only 2 people. I have helped friends do their fencing and having 3-5 people pulling and adjusting and stapling a long run makes things much easier.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
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    Default

    The shorter one doesn't have a brand name. Both are woven. Different grades of zinc coating.

    Red Brand and Braekert are the two top names.

    Whatever height you choose, a top rail of some sort is a good idea.



  11. #11
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
    I know from heavy cattle fencing that even if they don't mess with it, in time, some of the welds will break and you have very sharp wire edges sticking out.
    this
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    When we had our broodmare and race training operation, we used V mesh woven wire in the horse pens, even between stallions and never had any injury from that in many years.
    We did have maybe twice a pulled shoe in the runs.

    We had some places with the V mesh on railroad ties or round posts with a board over the top, in others on 8' distances on old well pipe for posts and top rail.
    We didn't have any hot wire then, but today that is an option for the top.
    Those pens are still like new today, several decades later.

    You could check into that v mesh also.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
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    5,400

    Default

    we used V mesh because the other farms around had installed it thirty years earlier.... that was twenty years ago and the ours and the fifty year old V mesh still is there in great shape



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    652

    Default

    The gusage of wire was also a bit different.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    SE Ky
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    4,382

    Default

    We have used the one (Red Brand) with the red wire on top for years. Rusts MUCH less than other brands.
    Sandy in Fla.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2001
    Location
    NW Louisiana
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    694

    Default

    Like previously stated one is welded and one is tied. Go with the tied as the welds will break over time and exposure to weather.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    Here's the description for fence number one, 48"x200ft :

    Make sure your horses are safe and secure with this Non-Climb Horse Fence. This fence is flexible, gives on impact, and is smooth on both sides to prevent injuries and snags. It also features a narrow vertical mesh to keep your horses from walking down or stepping through the fence.
    • Smooth on both sides to prevent snags
    • Narrow vertical mesh keeps horses from stepping through or walking down
    • 12.5 gauge wire
    • Woven fence
    • Class 1 zinc coating
    • 2 in. vertical spacing
    And here's the description for fence number two 60"x100ft:
    Smooth on both sides to prevent snags
    Narrow vertical mesh keeps horses from stepping through or walking down
    12.5 gauge wire
    Woven fence
    Class 1 zinc coating
    4 in. vertical spacing

    Plus this additional information:
    Product Description
    SKU Number: 3610715

    Manufacturers Number: 70314
    Size: 12 1/2
    Material: Low Carbon Steel
    Color: Gray
    Height: 60 in.
    Finish: Zinc Coated
    Length: 100 ft.
    Dimensions: 100 ft L x 60 in H
    Appearance: Bright Galvanized Finished Steel
    Applications: Used to Prevent Horses, Cows, Sheep, Goats, or Other Hoofed Animals from Stepping Through or Walking Down the Fence and Also Suitable for Dog Kennels
    Package Type: Roll
    Obvious difference is Brand name, height, length and verticle spacing. Both are woven, both are 12 gauge wire, both are class 1 zinc coating.

    Diamond V mesh is the gold standard at all the TB farms here. Looks nice, keeps out small animals and keeps in little foal feet. The longer rolls are a real bear for the DIY, but there are implements you can get for your tractor to hold it up and stretch it.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    Default

    We put up a lot of V-mesh with two 2" x 4" bolted together with the end of the roll sandwiched in the middle, stretched with a chain hooked on two spots on the 2" x 4" with a come-along.

    We still have the intact 2" x 4" several decades later.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    6,620

    Default

    Woven has a much better chance of holding up unless you get Red Brand or Braekart or Herdsman.

    I work at a small feedstore/ranch supply type place and some of the off brand wire companies will put their names on an inferior product. A really good deal on welding wire will not be a good deal at all-some we got in from China through a distributor literally blew apart as you unrolled the wire. Stick with a good brand, it's worth it.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Diamond V mesh is the gold standard at all the TB farms here. Looks nice, keeps out small animals and keeps in little foal feet. The longer rolls are a real bear for the DIY, but there are implements you can get for your tractor to hold it up and stretch it.
    The place I board has V mesh with steel pipe posts. A steel pipe top rail is welded on, so there is no sagging wire and the resulting fence is very strong. The fences were installed decades ago, and still look great. I would love to use the same, but they are very expensive. The downside is that they are certainly not as attractive as wood, but the sun and heat just dessicate wood here so I am, uh, have to say it, on the rail about what kind of fence I will be installing.
    Last edited by PeteyPie; Aug. 21, 2012 at 03:13 PM. Reason: spelling



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