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  1. #101
    Lucassb is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by KPF View Post
    I switched over about a year ago, and I love it but dang, it's hard! Be prepared to feel like a total beginner again!

    I bought a used Albion SLK and I love it. It felt like a LOT of saddle at first since I was used to hunt seat saddles, and I had to gradually lengthen my leathers, and after about six months I felt good sitting in it. It felt horrible at first, I won't lie. I still revert to the hunter perch and grippy calf sometimes, they're hard habits to break! It sucks going from having a rock solid leg position in hunters to struggling to get it right even part of the time in dressage. Very humbling!

    I'm an over-thinker so I really think dressage is a better fit for me, it gives my busy brain things to ponder instead of sitting there worrying about stuff while riding hunters. It's amazing how many things you need to be thinking about and doing all at once.

    Good luck and happy shopping!!!
    LOL, I am sure I am going to have to pretty much start over, and I am sure it will be hard! But hey, nothing ventured and all that. I am really looking forward to it. I've chosen a trainer that has has helped a number of riders make this transition successfully, so I think I will have plenty of help

    And did I mention I am pretty happy about the thought of having a good excuse to go shopping? (Guess that part of the HP is still firmly installed, haha.)
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    I'll put it this way. When we started sitting trot lengthenings, my instructor INSISTED that I get full seat britches so I wasn't sliding around in the saddle.
    I despise full seat breeches.

    Knee patch or no patch for me. IME, all the full seat does is stick to the saddle...and then I get rubs inside them...and, I hate the way they sag on my butt when I am between horses.

    I can just tolerate the extended patch. There are a few dressage riders, even at the upper levels, who ride in knee patch breeches.



  3. #103
    Lucassb is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    I tried a pair of Kerrits yesterday, and they were fine to ride in. I would like a slightly different rise, ideally - normal rise breeches end up looking like a shelf bra on me, LOL - but in terms of how they felt in the tack, I honestly couldn't really tell the difference compared to my regular knee patch breeches.

    That said, I have a small fortune invested in my Pikeur Ciara's, and don't plan on abandoning them anytime soon. They are euro seats, so have the "full seat seaming" ... at least it's a nod in the right direction!
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  4. #104
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    Can't comment further on the equipment, but do yourself a favor when trainer shopping and research the differences between classical and competitive dressage. I don't know how many trainers you'll have to choose from in your area.

    I hated dressage until I learned a bit about classical dressage, and rode a few classically trained horses. The lightness and self carriage is incredible.



  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sansena View Post
    Can't comment further on the equipment, but do yourself a favor when trainer shopping and research the differences between classical and competitive dressage. I don't know how many trainers you'll have to choose from in your area.

    I hated dressage until I learned a bit about classical dressage, and rode a few classically trained horses. The lightness and self carriage is incredible.
    You are not drawing a distinction between "classical" and "competitive."

    You are drawing a distinction between "correct" and "incorrect."



  6. #106
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    Perhaps. But I'm just speaking to my own personal preferences.

    Germanic/ competitive is very 'crash boom' IME, whereas the classical style I experiences was very light; instruction involved shifting one's weight in ounces, and moving bodyparts by single degrees.

    I won't mention the names of the trainers because I'm certain they're both regarded as "correct".



  7. #107
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    the differences between classical and competitive dressage.
    This is correct.

    One emphasizes developing the (young) horse for future movements, the other realizes that to show & win now, meet the judges expectations for that class.
    They are not mutually exclusive - the adjustments can be minor not foundational.

    One can watch the Elite Verband auctions to see this plainly demonstrated.



  8. #108
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    I must be completely classical because I havnt shown in a long while!

    LOL

    Your trainer should be able to instruct you how to ride dresage>.< (Period)Just basic dressage with correct foundations.

    If you decide to ribbon chase that is YOUR choice.

    If by chance along the way of learning correct riding you want to show what you have learned in front of a judge there is nothing wrong with that.You do not suddenly cross away from classical into dun dun duuuuuun competative.

    Not all ribbon chasers are unclassical in their approach at home with their trainers and not all classical are correct in their approach at home with theirs.

    The common denominator is you and what you decide
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
    http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/



  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sansena View Post
    Perhaps. But I'm just speaking to my own personal preferences.

    Germanic/ competitive is very 'crash boom' IME, whereas the classical style I experiences was very light; instruction involved shifting one's weight in ounces, and moving bodyparts by single degrees.

    I won't mention the names of the trainers because I'm certain they're both regarded as "correct".
    My dressage trainers/clinicians (or, the ones I return to, at least) all focus endlessly on tremendous lightness to the hand and riding the horse almost entirely off the seat. Hands and legs are viewed as "accessories." If I use the hand at all it better be for less than half a stride before letting go again, and only after a subtle weight shift didn't do it. On my personal horse I rarely have more than an "empty coffee mug" in the hand -and that's when half halting.

    Can you tell from that paragraph who I ride with?
    Nuno himself or a USDF certified individual?



  10. #110
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    I just made the switch in the last month, and basically dove in headfirst. My first ride was on an ex-Grand Prix horse in full dressage tack, and it felt really weird. Actually, it felt like I was a bumbling idiot when I discovered that I couldn't steer, and I still felt like a bumbling idiot for a few weeks. Now? Now I'm just a regular idiot.

    The big things that helped me: watching experienced riders ride, watching some of the riding DVDs, and just sheer determination. I hate feeling stupid, so I was willing to go until I either passed out or did it right (also, I'm not allowed to have water until I do it right, and I live in South FL. Some good motivation there. ).

    Full-seats are a no-go for me. I have two pairs, but I much prefer riding in my knee patch breeches. Have fun!



  11. #111
    Lucassb is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polki View Post
    I just made the switch in the last month, and basically dove in headfirst. My first ride was on an ex-Grand Prix horse in full dressage tack, and it felt really weird. Actually, it felt like I was a bumbling idiot when I discovered that I couldn't steer, and I still felt like a bumbling idiot for a few weeks. Now? Now I'm just a regular idiot.

    The big things that helped me: watching experienced riders ride, watching some of the riding DVDs, and just sheer determination. I hate feeling stupid, so I was willing to go until I either passed out or did it right (also, I'm not allowed to have water until I do it right, and I live in South FL. Some good motivation there. ).

    Full-seats are a no-go for me. I have two pairs, but I much prefer riding in my knee patch breeches. Have fun!
    Haha, I am with you on the bumbling idiot feeling!!

    I had my first dressage lesson last week in the trainer's dressage saddle, and was somewhat horrified at my ineptitude, LOL. Like you, though, I hate feeling stupid and dove in headfirst with the attitude that I was just going to s*ck it up and figure it out.

    Once I got a little more used to the longer leg/different seat, I have to say I felt a lot better and was more effective. My horse is already pretty well educated, so at this point it's really a matter of pushing the right buttons with him; the trainer was very complimentary of him which was certainly nice to hear. Apparently the other H/J horses she has worked with in the past had some difficulty with things I would consider fairly basic (leg yield, shoulder in, good transitions within and between gaits) but these are all tools that all of my horses have always been schooled on.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post

    Not all ribbon chasers are unclassical in their approach at home with their trainers and not all classical are correct in their approach at home with theirs.
    Isn't that that true?



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