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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2000
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    Columbia, Maryland
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    7,575

    Default Train Hits Truck and Trailer in Canada - Two Horses Killed

    Happened at an uncontrolled crossing. I have a hard time understanding how people get themselves in these situations. Two horses paid the price for the mistake these women made.

    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/train-hits-...002704703.html
    "No matter how well you perform there's always somebody of intelligent opinion who thinks it's lousy." - Laurence Olivier



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2010
    Posts
    531

    Default

    Very sad, Mike.

    I also don't understand...do people not practice basic train safety? I was always taught to stop at uncontrolled crossings, and look both ways before proceeding. This was strictly enforced while learning to drive - my grandfather worked for the railroad so my mom grew up hearing horror stories about train accidents.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2000
    Location
    Upperco, MD
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    479

    Default

    A 15 yo was driving the rig with the trailer? SERIOUSLY???? Fifteen year olds shouldn't even be DRIVING a car if you ask me.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
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    1,470

    Default

    2 different stories in one-very misleading. The 15 year old was driving the camper that got hit a few weeks ago where kids were killed, different story from the horse trailer rig where horses got killed but seems the people were ok.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2006
    Location
    Port Perry Ontario - formerly Prodomus
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    2,364

    Default

    I have heard of the leg of the gooseneck not being put high enough and getting caught on train tracks before.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
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    Default

    I heard this on the news this morning, but missed where it happened. There are some pretty big problems with level crossings here in Saskatchewan starting with most of them being uncontrolled. In many places the tracks parallel the highways (not in this most recent incident) and the distance between tracks and highway is pretty short, some so short that semis hauling grain from a dirt or grid road to the highway cannot fit between the tracks and the highway stop sign. Still other crossings are higher by a foot or three than the road that crosses the tracks and others are at an odd angle and still others visibility is obscured by old shelter belts and some crossings are a combination of all of the above.

    The two accidents happened over 400 miles apart and there was a third maybe 6 weeks ago where a man was crossing at a very bad crossing with a tractor ad 70' of equipment and was hit and killed. That particular crossing has had many close calls because of over grown shelter belts and the curve of the track.
    .
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  7. #7
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    Feb. 23, 2003
    Location
    Norcross GA
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    Default

    I'll add that near my grandparent's farm in eastern Ontario, there are a number of uncontrolled track crossings which cross the county highway. Speed limit out there is approx 60mph of open, flat road - no one stops & looks before crossing. However, tree lines often obscure what is coming - and to be honest - I've never actually seen a train on any of those tracks - which adds to why no one stops.
    TIMBERRIDGE SPORTHORSES:
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,409

    Default

    Very sad.

    I am always checking at ANY crossing, controlled or not.

    The signal and gates are something that can malfunction.

    I don't want to be the one that finds out it is broke...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    We've had a few accidents locally on private grade crossings, where the farm road goes over the tracks. Trains are nothing to be messed with!
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2009
    Location
    College View
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    1,293

    Default

    There are a lot of uncontrolled crossings here. One just a mile away from me. Out here in production cropland... what we call "grain trains" service a lot of the grain storage facilities and the tracks are just used so infrequently that it would be totally impractical to have any lights or gates at all the lightly-used backroads intersecting with very lightly used track crossings. Heck, half of the road/road intersections out here are not even controlled. Now, the grain trains here move pretty slowly.. so even where the crossing might be blocked by foliage or anything, a car could get across the tracks before the train reached the crossing, or the car could probably stop. I am so so careful at rail crossings. After all... you literally have to put yourself in front of a train to get hit. The train travels a well-defined path. Except in the rare circumstances where a train actually de-rails or you get rear-ended and pushed onto the tracks or something... if you get hit by a train... it's because you have put yourself right in it's path.



  11. #11
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    Mar. 28, 2002
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    East of Dog River
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    Default

    The oddest thing about the man with the tractor getting hit is that the Soo Line is probably the busiest rail line in Western Canada and that man knew it, had crossed the tracks in that spot hundreds of times (yes, I knew him and his parents). There are literally a dozen or more trains going each way every day except for Sundays so I am guessing that the poor guy got caught on the tracks while waiting for clearance to cross the highway; going north has a good sight line but south has almost none. I think CP is likely going to finish putting gates at all those crossings from the US border to wherever in Alberta that there is a divergence in highway and rail line paths - they have to do something with trains rocketing along at 60+mph - fully loaded, very long trains.

    Don't know what the problem was in Saskatoon yesterday. but that used to be a heavily used line as well years ago. CN hasn't made a news release about the accident that I heard although Transport Canada and CN jointly released another warning about uncontrolled crossings.
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  12. #12
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    Apr. 17, 2012
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    Default

    Y'know, why are the railroads still relying on line-of-sight to hope to avoid things like this?

    For 35 years even the smallest tug or fishing vessel has had a radar rig that shows every object on the ocean bigger than a bread-box for a 50-mile radius. Seems to me that fitting trains with a landsman's equivalent, focused solely on the track ahead for say the next 10 miles, would give them time to stop if someone was truly "stuck" on the tracks. As for people who try to race the train to the crossing, well, that's what we call the Darwin Award. Just a pity it had to be someone's kids or horses!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2009
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    New England
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    Default

    Did anyone else pick up on the "fright" train?

    "Just over a week ago a crash between a fright train and a camper near Broadview, Sask. left several prairie communities shaken by grief after three children and a teen were killed in the accident."



  14. #14
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SwampYankee View Post
    Y'know, why are the railroads still relying on line-of-sight to hope to avoid things like this?

    For 35 years even the smallest tug or fishing vessel has had a radar rig that shows every object on the ocean bigger than a bread-box for a 50-mile radius. Seems to me that fitting trains with a landsman's equivalent, focused solely on the track ahead for say the next 10 miles, would give them time to stop if someone was truly "stuck" on the tracks. . . .

    Radar sees EVERYTHING. There'd be too much clutter.
    I suppose if you put together a radar/GPS combo and give the radar a limited sweep of 120 degrees in front of you it could help some, but it can't see through buildings, any elevation change above its plane and things like heavy rain and large groups of trees.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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