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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    411

    Default Apple cider vinegar for rain rot

    Thanks to nearly a week of heavy rain, my boy has rain rot on the top of his bum. He is out 24/7 with access to trees for shelter. His coat is shiny and healthy, and he is in good weight, in work 5 days a week, and on a great feeding program. This is the first time he has had this problem.

    A groom at my barn recommended using apple cider vinegar for three days, and that would clear it up. I trust her opinion, but I figured I'd go to you lovely COTHers for a second opinion. Does ACV work? Today I scrubbed at it with Ivory dish soap and dried the area very well after. Do I still need to scrub the area before spraying on the vinegar?
    Proud mother to Matt, a 18 year-old TB gelding.

    FOREVER



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2008
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    611

    Default

    Never heard of using ACV, so I'll be interested to hear others chime in. That would certainly be a cheap and easy solution!! I have a mixture of Iodine, baby oil, and hydrogen peroxide that works really well.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,463

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    Just put a few ounces of Nolvasan solution in a bucket of warm water with shampoo and wash horsie. Voila - all gone.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,398

    Default

    Yes, I have successfully used ACV for rain rot--it works even better if you put a little tea tree oil in it. I do think it will take longer than three days, though.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2012
    Posts
    1,961

    Default

    My vet usually recommends dish soap--Dawn, Palmolive, that kind of thing.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
    2,461

    Default

    I have a friend who recommends apple cider vinegar for everything! I haven't tried it. I have used Head n'Shoulders with great results. One treatment did it.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2012
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    54

    Default

    I gently pick any scabs to let the oozy stuff out, spray with a 50/50solution of water and table salt, allow to dry and then damp the area with ACV. Clears it up pretty quick.

    Blue Kote and Schreiner's also work well, but I prefer the ACV.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2010
    Posts
    434

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    Vinegar, of any sort, works well on fungus. It's the acidity that makes the skin environment in hospitable to fungus and possibly other gunk. Works quite well for Athlete's Foot also.

    chicamuxen



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2011
    Posts
    1,395

    Default

    I have gotten into the habit of powdering backs with Gold Bond when we get weeks of endless showers before rainrot starts. Once the valve is turned on around here everything is damp for days and days and days.

    But I'll keep ACV in mind. Thanks for the tip.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,456

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    Muck Itch works better and faster than any product for rain rot that I have tried. And I have tried many, many products.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
    Location
    SW PA
    Posts
    1,811

    Default

    BTW I would not pick off the scabs, you don't want to break the skin open leaving room for infection. I like to treat rain rot the same way Equibrit does. After about a day or so the scabs should come off easily with a soft curry.
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2008
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Don't pick the scabs. Let them soften and fall off. I use a 3 way mix of Novalsan, ACV and Mineral Oil. Softens those scabs up and off they go.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    12,544

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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    Just put a few ounces of Nolvasan solution in a bucket of warm water with shampoo and wash horsie. Voila - all gone.
    This.
    I'd avoid baby oil, as letting the lesions be exposed to air be dry is important.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    12,544

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    Quote Originally Posted by chicamux View Post
    Vinegar, of any sort, works well on fungus. It's the acidity that makes the skin environment in hospitable to fungus and possibly other gunk. Works quite well for Athlete's Foot also.

    chicamuxen
    Rain rot is bacterial, not fungal.
    (Dermatophilus congolensis)
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    12,544

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BoyleHeightsKid View Post
    BTW I would not pick off the scabs, you don't want to break the skin open leaving room for infection. I like to treat rain rot the same way Equibrit does. After about a day or so the scabs should come off easily with a soft curry.
    Removing the crusts is important.
    You already *have* an infection.

    (And my dermatology professor is saying in my head, "they're *crusts*, not scabs. A scab is someone who crosses a picket line.")
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
    Posts
    2,465

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteyPie View Post
    I have a friend who recommends apple cider vinegar for everything! .
    that's because time+ changing conditions makes stuff go away. Add anything that doesn't make it worse and time+ changing conditions and it still goes away.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2012
    Posts
    116

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    Rain rot is a bacteria which superficially resembles a fungus. Any bacteria will have a range of pH in which it can live, and adding a lot of acid (aka vinegar) can kill it. There may also be other compounds in apple cider vinegar which are bacteriostatic but that we don't know about. However acid is also irritating to wounds, so your horse may or may not tolerate it straight applied. Cutting it with water cuts the potency (no matter what the homeopaths say!).

    A simpler solution is to use something that is designed to be BOTH A: bactericidal, and B: safe for use on mucous membranes and skin. This is known as an "antiseptic", this is different from a "disinfectant" (eg. bleach) which is NOT safe for mucous membranes. You can choose from any commercially available antiseptics and apply them following the instructions. My personal favorite for my very sensitive yearling was chlorhexidine AKA nolvasan AKA hibiclens, which can be bought at a drug store in a generic version, diluted, and used as a scrub or a shampoo. Just remember to dry well, because some bacteria will be able to survive whatever you put on by hiding in clumps of crust or hair or dirt, and then any leftover water (sans antiseptic) will stimulate their growth and you are back where you started. Good luck, rain rot is a pain!
    "Here? It's like asking a bunch of rednecks which is better--Ford or Chevy?" ~Deltawave



  18. #18

    Default

    My vet recommends dandruff shampoo and it has worked great any time I see a little gunk starting to form on my mares legs, neck, or butt from sweat and pasture dew; the shampoo clears it up with just a couple uses. If its severe case my vet recommends antibiotics.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    South-Central PA
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    FYI - the best thing to pick scabs with is a flea comb! I think I read that tip somewhere on the COTH boards a few years back and it works amazingly well! It almost makes the job enjoyable
    Cindy



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mali View Post
    FYI - the best thing to pick scabs with is a flea comb! I think I read that tip somewhere on the COTH boards a few years back and it works amazingly well! It almost makes the job enjoyable
    Best if you soften the crusts by washing first.
    Also, dispose of them--they're loaded with the infectious organism.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



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