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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    I disagree. If the kids have never barrel raced before, even a horse that has been outgrown from its current child could be too much for the kid to handle. Also, it sounds like the OP is not in this for the money, but for the fun. If I had a horse that could be safely used to start my kids on barrel racing, I would use that horse, and save my money. Good kids' barrel horses are hard to find, and even harder to find an affordable one!

    If your mare is sane enough to put a kid on and let them dabble on the pattern, go for it.
    <lol> I disagree w/your disagreement. I said to find a horse that "is doing what you want your kids to do". If you want them to cruise the pattern at a trot, then find a horse who can do that. I didn't say go find a crotch rocket and turn them loose. <lol> *rolls eyes*

    And as far as putting a kid on a green-to-showing horse and letting them dabble, there's really nothing innately wrong w/that if the horse is sane, like you said. But there is a strong possibility the kid will get discouraged -- been there, done that. If you want your youngun to have fun, and you're not a trainer yourself, then you find a horse who can already perform the job you want done - at whatever level you're wanting it done.

    And around here, you're not going to get anywhere "dabbling". I mean -- if you're going to spend the money to go show, it would behoove you to get a horse that would actually give you a way to do that. Case in point. A girl in our area came to me for riding lessons. She started out wanting to jump, but then - like me - she and her family determined it was just easier to go the speed event way. So --- they took one of their own horses who was broke, but not trained for speed events... and she had a miserable time that summer. Horse wouldn't go in the arena, horse didn't know the patterns, horse was an old jumper and knew what a show was, but she was sour and needed some training.

    So - mom asked, "Will you train her?" I said, "I will, but let's do this instead..." So she borrowed a horse from me. A horse who could carry her daughter around the patterns safely - either at a walk, or a trot, or at a canter - and accommodate her beginning unsureness, yet had enough speed in reserve to make a decent sort of showing when the youngun got enough confidence.

    They played at the shows for a summer and had a great time. MUCH better than the year before. They used her again the next summer and finished well enough in their association to qualify for state events. Mom asked me, paraphrased, "What are the parameters w/in Joy (the mare) will work for M--?"

    I answered, "Until she wants to win." I knew my mare's capabilities, and winning in our tough, local competition wasn't part of it. <lol> (We are in Mississippi - folks around here don't play around w/the speed events, they're serious)

    So --- at the state show the girl piloted Joy to a personal best time for Joy in all their events. By then Joy was completely maxed out and had gone over and beyond anything I'd ever seen her do, and the girl had learned a lot and was ready for more speed. They bought an old rope horse who didn't know the patterns, but who was broke, broke, broke. The pair won High Point Speed Reserve Champion their first year together.

    Now THAT is what I'm talking about. They could have piddled around w/their old jumping show pony, but the girl was super frustrated and wasn't having fun. So, they got a horse who was doing what they wanted the girl to do -- have fun at the shows, get out in the classes, and learn how to run the events. Then when she outgrew that horse's abilities they bought a horse who didn't know much about patterns, but who was willing and fast and by then their daughter had three years of running under her belt and they had an absolute blast at those shows.

    To my way of thinking, you can't really compare speed event shows in an area where that is the major sport, to play day/ gymkhana shows in an area where it is more of a novelty. IMHO, and no disrespect intended.
    Last edited by arena run; Aug. 21, 2012 at 10:29 AM.
    Never explain yourself to someone who is committed to misunderstanding you.



  2. #22
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    Well I do agree if the horse doesnt want to do it then you have to go find one if that's what you want to do. Sour horses are no fun but I would give mine a chance to see.

    I do agree that the kiddos should have some lessons from someone that barrel races and gives lessons. A good trainer is key in any horse sport. But if mom is a good rider there is no reason she can't bring the horse along on everything if she does know how like bending, giving, stopping, seat, leg, etc if she doesn't then a good trainer to help her is also good. A good sane barrel horse for kids is not cheap to come by. You are going to spend some good money usually.

    Arena run just for curiosity sake if you sold the mare that the girl rode and learned on what would you want for her? In my area one like that is going to cost you 10k or up.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  3. #23
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Around here, for the next few months, emails like this one will be making the rounds:

    "forward please!

    Midget is a finished goat tying and breakaway horse. he is 14 1/2 hands, 10 yrs. old and a very easy keeper!
    please contact me with questions or if you are interested!"

    Those are from kids moving up and needing more horse, or going on to college, or just quitting horses.
    You can find them in all sizes, ages, sexes, registered or not, sound or not and also all prices.

    The local competitors, traders, trainers, farriers, vets, all are getting those and many time know the horses also.

    OP, who knows, your mare may just take to playdays like a duck to water, but do get someone that knows to show you a bit what to do.
    Running barrels well is kind of technical any more and why not learn right from the start?



  4. #24
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    Jul. 6, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by rabicon View Post
    Well I do agree if the horse doesnt want to do it then you have to go find one if that's what you want to do. Sour horses are no fun but I would give mine a chance to see.

    I do agree that the kiddos should have some lessons from someone that barrel races and gives lessons. A good trainer is key in any horse sport. But if mom is a good rider there is no reason she can't bring the horse along on everything if she does know how like bending, giving, stopping, seat, leg, etc if she doesn't then a good trainer to help her is also good. A good sane barrel horse for kids is not cheap to come by. You are going to spend some good money usually.

    Arena run just for curiosity sake if you sold the mare that the girl rode and learned on what would you want for her? In my area one like that is going to cost you 10k or up.
    <lol> I'd have to have about 1.7 million for Joybird. However... I will loan her out to anyone I trusted. For free.

    Here's a link to some fb pics of her.
    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?s...3&l=2f6ca499ff

    She is priceless to me. Anytime I'm under the weather and don't feel like dealing w/crap from a horse, and both times I was recovering from a broken bone, Joy has traditionally been my Horse of Choice. I can go get on her in the pasture, no bridle, no saddle, no nothing... and we can just have fun. She has one of THE smoothest trots I've ever ridden, and a very nice canter, too. Her walk is like molasses in winter, <lol>, but she is very capable and relatively spook-free - she doesn't like snakey areas on the trail in the spring time and will sproing through them if given the choice).

    Her repertoire includes (but isn't limited to) reining (placed at state level w/my 18 and over daughter and would have won district 4H some-odd years previous if self-same daughter hadn't bungled the pattern <lol>), all local speed events (barrel, arena race, panty race, poles, quads, stakes, key hole), water glass, western pleasure, walk/trot (she usually places in this class), judged trail, showmanship, mounted drill team, pony rides at autistic summer camp, and countless "first rides" for kids and adults alike.

    I have plans for her to be my grandkids' first horse. That's a few more years off, but she'll be who I choose that first year or two for all of them I'm sure.

    She has been ridden and used in shows by me, two of my kids, my niece, two other families, and I think somewhere in thee was another loaning out but I can't remember. She has carried too-many-to-count folks on trail rides here at my house and has been ridden as a catch ride in drill team and at shows by many more kids and some adults even (she's 14.0, but still big enough to qualify as a non-pony at our local shows) She teaches people to ride, keeps them safe (she does have a little sassy heiney hike she'll throw in every now and then, but she has yet to lose a rider, and most times they're grinning when she gets through and then they just kick her on up), and she is durn cute while she's doing it. Imho.


    PS -- I don't mean it to sound as though Joy were a perfect girl. SHe's not. She'll go to sleep at the trailer and also while you're on her at the show! You have to wake her up to run - and you have to pay attention when she's tied to the trailer or you'll spook her awake (she doesn't set back though). She has a locking stifle and can't stay in a stall and has to have joint supplements and also VitE/Sel supplement if she's going to be ridden. She is L-A-Z-Y and will only move up in speed if she knows you can make her. She has a pretty clear-cut idea of what she will, and will not, do for any specific person - for some she behaves like a dream, for others I can see her ears sweeping back and her getting frustrated and fixing to tell them just what's what. Usually the ones who are simply being a passenger and leaving it totally up to her are the ones she gets upset with and she'll take advantage of them. She doesn't have to be told what to do every single step, but she does need to know someone "is there". She isn't hard to catch, but she will poke along while being led and she has to be reminded to come on up. She has to have a short, but somewhat intense refresher before going into showmanship class! <lolol>
    Last edited by arena run; Aug. 21, 2012 at 01:17 PM.
    Never explain yourself to someone who is committed to misunderstanding you.



  5. #25
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    Yes she sounds like a great girl! But there is the problem most people wouldn't sell that amazing horse like you and if they do they want some money for it for sure. A good safe horse is worth their weight in gold to me when they can take you safely and do anything. Like my guy market value right now maybe 6k with a year of dressage training in him but not showing till next year but it's his brain that makes him worth sooo much more. I'll never sell him. He will retire here like the rest of my guys but if I had to I'd want 20k at least lol. Because IMO his brain is worth every cent of it lol
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  6. #26
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    Jan. 27, 2004
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    I dabbled with barrel racing as a teenager because the first 'real' horse I bought happened to be trained and very experienced running barrels and poles at the county fair level. She would lateral from leg and weight, and do a sliding stop when I sat down hard. Boy, was she fun. So, naturally, I had to play around with actual barrels and whatnot, in addition to riding like a maniac on trails.

    I still like using barrels and cones for training and working my horses at the w/t/c. It can be a useful tool for teaching lead changes, adjusting stride, bending, etc. Even if it does look a little goofy with a TB under English tack...
    ---------------------------



  7. #27
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    I don't barrel race now, but when I was a kid, I rode both english and western. Yes it was confusing for my horses. (one was blind in one eye, so he had to be careful with the 2nd barrel, we only went right to left to middle back then. the other was a 1/2 tb 1/2 SB five gaited horse.)

    The Hendry family, which lived across the road from me, had a western barn. Helen Hendry was from California. (She died this year at age 94 back in California.) She organized the "Circle M"' riding club (we lived at Montgomery outside of town) and we had a drill team as well as barrel racing after church on Sunday. I still have a picture of us riding in the drill team when the local paper came out to do a story.

    It was a lot of fun. I did that till I went off to college. My farrier was 2x barrel racing champ of GA (I thought it was 3x, but he said he came in 2nd one time) and he keeps telling me that I need a QH. I keep promising to make Cloudy run barrels.



  8. #28
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    Oct. 14, 2004
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    Connecticut
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    Quote Originally Posted by rabicon View Post
    Honestly to have a good barrel horse they need to have fire in them. The fire doesn't have to be dangerous though -
    Exactly. I had a great barrel mare when I was younger. Trained her myself using a book written by "Martha Josey".

    Some other Gaming riders had horses that would bolt, rear, -simply on the verge of losing control.
    That is not the making of a good barrel horse.

    Yes, my mare would get excited entering the chute, but never, ever uncontrollable.

    She knew how to rate herself and I never had to pull and yank like some of the other riders.

    It's also not a matter of whether the horse enjoys it or not.
    Conformation is key!!!!

    Check out
    http://www.barrelhorseworld.com/
    for lots of information.

    You can also find lots of DVDs, and books on selecting the correct barrel horse and training.

    Good luck.. It's tons of fun!!!



  9. #29
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    Jul. 6, 2012
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    Ohio
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    Honestly, I don't want to put money into a well trained contesting horse if this is something the kids and husband just want to try, especially if I have a mare in the field who needs ridden.

    Personally, I train my horses for dressage, hunters, and jumpers. I have trained one contesting horse, but that was at least 6 years ago. I regretfully sold her, the worst decision I ever made..She would be great to have back right about now... I know she was extreamly calm and she would do anything you asked at any time, but man oh man she was fast! I only sold her because, I'd rather jump fences and she was not a fan of jumping.

    I completly understand conformation is key. Athena is not built to be a barrel racer, she's built to be a jumper. Actually she has some of the best movement I have ever seen in a Quarter Horse. I've had several jumper barns offer to buy her off me and many complements at shows. That's why we breed her for sport horses... I figured Athena is now going on 10 years old and can't be a broodmare for ever. She absolutly loves the kids and loves to be ridden around bareback and in a halter. I know she will love play days.

    Athena is one horse I will never sell, therefore I want to put her to use. (she just loves to have the attention anyway). I don't want to purchase another horse...we are out of pasture space since we just broght home another horse last month. Honestly, I am a firm believer in paying for what you get and I don't want to be one of those people asking for a kid broke, husband safe, not hot, experienced contesting horse, under the age of 15, registered QH mare, for under $1000.. I just can't bring myself to do it.

    I don't have the time to show Athena at jumper shows, there isn't any within a 2hr radius... All of our family friends are barrel racers and actually a really close friend is showing at Quarter Horse Congress this year. I believe she said she placed 3rd in the state this year. So I know if I need any help, she will be right there for me.

    rabicon- Completly agree brain is worth a million bucks to me. I will not ever put my kids on a hot horse, it's never worth that kind of risk.

    To simply put, I know Athena will never be the best at contesting...She's never been too good at tight turns, but if she likes it and the kids only want to ride why not? We are not trying to be the best, but simply let the mare enjoy life and let the kids enjoy riding. If the kids really want to get into contesting then I'll look into selling one of the mares in trade for contesting mare, but I'll give them a year to decide.

    Heck maybe by next year my youngest daughter may want to start jumping...who knows with kids!



  10. #30
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    <lol> If you had put this lastest post in your first post, you would have gotten a few different answers than you did. I think you pretty much answered your own question. You have a horse you can train yourself, you have experience w/at least one other speed horse's training, the horse you have now loves your kids and has been ridden on and off for her entire life, and it isn't feasible for you to spend money on another horse at the moment when - for all you know - the speed bug hasn't bitten too hard at the moment. To top it off - you mentioned you did want to use her for something, and you don't want to sell her....

    Well -- there ya go.

    I do believe you could get everything on the "wish list" you posted for under $1000 around here. There are kid's horses all over the place who can introduce a young'in to play day events safely and you can pick them up pretty cheap if you know where to look, are patient, and have something of a trainer mindset. But to require them to be registered? *giggles a little bit here* Yeah, that puts a whole new spin to it. That won't happen for anything less than $4000 in my neck of the woods.

    I want to add one more thing, but I'm not finding the right words to convey my thoughts. But -- you sound like a mom who can understand what I'm trying to say here. The only caveat I would add is to keep an eye on their level of desire "to do well", and don't let them get frustrated if your mare turns out to be not a good fit for this type event.

    In my area a re-purposed broodie that you are able to train yourself can get you introduced to the atmosphere and the patterns (to a degree), but if you want to "not be last" all the time, you'll need to look into stepping up the equine part of the equation after the first season.
    Last edited by arena run; Aug. 23, 2012 at 11:10 AM.
    Never explain yourself to someone who is committed to misunderstanding you.



  11. #31
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    Ohio
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    I was looking for reasons why everyone else decided to barrel race. Obviously my reason is because the hubby and kids want to do it so, here I am training a horse to do it... <lol>

    LOL the registered part is what gets me everytime... yes I want the all can do mare but needs to be registered for less than 1k...haha.. Can't help but laugh at the thought. Never in my dreams will that happen.



  12. #32
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    Aug. 30, 2012
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    Barrel Racing is extremely exhilerating and I love that the timer is the judge. Having the most silver or the flashiest clothes or saddle just does not equate with being a winner in this sport.
    Barrel Racing is about much more then a fast horse. I can't even count the number of people who have come up to me and said they have the best barrel horse in their backyard cause boy can it run in the field. LOL
    A barrel horse needs a special spark - a motivation to work. Its not so much a hotness thing as it is a can't be lazy thing. Most horses can make beginner barrel horses if they are reasonably well broke and responsive. Moving on from that level requires a different type of horse and a different investment of personal time. It is the same as any other discipline. To do well - you need to put the hours in and train, train, train. You also need a horse that has the heart to give its all and the conformation to keep it sound.
    Mary-Anne



  13. #33
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    Mar. 28, 2012
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    I started barrel racing because it looked like fun. My first horse did not have good conformation, but she was honest, automatic, & sane.
    I don't know how old your kids are, but most shows around here have a Peewee class for 10 & under. Entry fee is usually $5, and every contestant wins $4-$5 at the end, depending on if money is kept out for year end awards. A lot of the kids are lead around the pattern, or walk the pattern with mom or dad beside them. a few of the older kids might do a nice easy lope. It is a good way to get them started and see if it is something they would be interested in, and you don't need any special horse. Everyone wins. The kids that start going faster move up into the Youth class. If your kids are young, you could start with something like this on the mare you have, and if they like & it and want to continue, your mare will have some shows under her belt & you will have an idea of her capabilities.



  14. #34
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    Conformation is key!!!!

    So - do you like horses that have traditional AQHA conformation or rangier types? The barrel horses I see appear to be a little leggier and tb-like than the more traditional stock type horses.



  15. #35
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    Jul. 6, 2012
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    Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikchik View Post
    I don't know how old your kids are, but most shows around here have a Peewee class for 10 & under. Entry fee is usually $5, and every contestant wins $4-$5 at the end, depending on if money is kept out for year end awards. A lot of the kids are lead around the pattern, or walk the pattern with mom or dad beside them. a few of the older kids might do a nice easy lope. It is a good way to get them started and see if it is something they would be interested in, and you don't need any special horse. Everyone wins. The kids that start going faster move up into the Youth class. If your kids are young, you could start with something like this on the mare you have, and if they like & it and want to continue, your mare will have some shows under her belt & you will have an idea of her capabilities.
    This is the reason why I'm interested! My children range from age 2 through 14. The 9 year old and the 6 year old are the ones interested in barrel racing. I know this mare is not specifically bred for barrel racing and I don't expect her to be the best, but if the kids like it over the next year or so then I will look into investing into a well bred contesting horse.

    To answer your question Flash: I've always loved the leggier and tb-like quarter's because of my jumping and dressage background. I'm always on the look out for the big sweepy strided quarter horses. The mare in question looks more tb-like rather than a traditional quarter horse.



  16. #36
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    Another bonus- if you have go for a year or so on the horse you have, you will be able to scope out horses that are about to be outgrown, and will have had the opportunity to see them multiple times in different situations. You will have a better "in" on the good kids horses. Around here, good kids barrel horses are rarely advertised, they are passed on by word of mouth.



  17. #37
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    Oct. 7, 2012
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    Minnesota
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    I started barrel racing through my local 4-H club. My parents bought me a cheap grade paint gelding to compete with, and to tell you the truth I almost gave up on it because he was one of the most difficult horses I have ever worked with (bucked me off more than I stayed on) and had never really been started in much of anything. But you know what?? I stayed with him and I've learned so much from him. I definitely would not be the rider I am today without him. (Sometimes your best teachers aren't push-button ponies.) He stopped his rotten streak a year or two after I got him and became one of my most trusted horses.

    As the years passed by, I kept working with him and when I had him in his prime he was clocking competitive times even when comparing to the NBHA or rodeo people.

    My advice? Start hitting up a couple fun shows for your first runs and attend clinics or find a trainer if finances allow. Watch videos and read books on starting barrel horses, and just plain have fun!!



  18. #38
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    Feb. 18, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by rabicon View Post
    Honestly to have a good barrel horse they need to have fire in them. The fire doesn't have to be dangerous though but they do need to like to run and aren't lazy. I've also found asking a lazy horse that doesn't like to run to constantly run makes them grumpy and sour and you'll start getting a horse that won't turn the barrels and I've actually seen horse that slow down a lot durning their run just refusing to go fast also have seen some turn to rearers which is sooo scary.
    Not necessarily. I rode a son of Judge Cash for a couple of years. He was off the track and one of the laziest horse I've ever ridden. He walked in the arena like a damn plow horse. Once he started to know his job a little bit more, he walked in a little fresher, but damn that horse could run, and could shut it off in an instant. He had more than enough speed when asked for it. The first time I rode him, he was so lazy I had to use a crop to get him to canter! Never rode him without spurs. Once he got to know the patterns he would occasionally get slightly grumpy during practice while on the pattern, but on the whole, was a very chill, happy dude.



  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoyalPrestige View Post
    I started barrel racing through my local 4-H club. My parents bought me a cheap grade paint gelding to compete with, and to tell you the truth I almost gave up on it because he was one of the most difficult horses I have ever worked with (bucked me off more than I stayed on) and had never really been started in much of anything. But you know what?? I stayed with him and I've learned so much from him. I definitely would not be the rider I am today without him. (Sometimes your best teachers aren't push-button ponies.) He stopped his rotten streak a year or two after I got him and became one of my most trusted horses.
    You probably ride better than most because of him.



  20. #40
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    Well, I'm sure I have tons yet to learn, but I am so glad I never stopped working with him. Sure did make life interesting .



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