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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2012
    Posts
    35

    Default So looks like I get the farm back

    UGH! At 63 yrs old just what I need. I have been leasing the large training barn out and a home on the property with option to buy. The option has fallen through and the barn and fencing are a mess.

    It is no longer under a yearly lease, just a month to month. The tenants are looking for other smaller property. I am tired of people trashing my place, so my only option right now is to save my sanity, take it back and do something with it. Lots of work ahead and I really don't want to get into a large scale boarding facility. I do need to supplement my retirement income. I have already started fixing the fencing and what I can, although they are still there and haven't given me any notice yet. I just don't want it to get more run down and as soon as I decide what it is I want to do, I will give them notice.



    I am thinking retirement horses and a few pasture boarders with stalls available as needed. I just don't really know what the market is and need to research it for our area. I will need to publish another website and come out of retirement.

    I have an indoor arena and outdoor with lights, plus over 100 acres. Shelters in most pastures. I can still rent the house without the barn, or offer a stall or two to the tenant.
    I am overwhelmed right now and do have some physical issues like back and foot problems so would need help.


    Has anyone on here had to go back into the business after retiring? Any ideas?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,417

    Default

    My advice is evict them now, before they trash the place even more than they have already.

    Maybe you can rent the pasture out to someone who will raise cattle. That can be very profitable, and is a minimal investment, because you'll fix the fence anyway.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    I would love a place like that. Too bad people take advantage of it. It is not near me is it? I have been looking for a place to lease with no such luck.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2011
    Posts
    755

    Default

    what's your location??



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    6,762

    Default

    Consider leasing the pasture and, as sacriligious as it sounds... the indoor could be rented for storage space...



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2012
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Derby Lyn Farms View Post
    I would love a place like that. Too bad people take advantage of it. It is not near me is it? I have been looking for a place to lease with no such luck.
    No, I am in the south. But you can move!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2012
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmartAlex View Post
    Consider leasing the pasture and, as sacriligious as it sounds... the indoor could be rented for storage space...
    Oh No! I need my indoor! I have my horses here in a different barn. I love my indoor, but it has been so busy with students that I can never get in there!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2011
    Posts
    375

    Default

    I really don't understand people not taking care of farms. I rent our facility, and we have added a TON to the property from when we started a year ago. I would kill to get my hands on something with better pastures - we babysit the grass we do have like crazy. To me, that's just basic farm management. How disappointing, that you haven't found someone to take care of it.

    Just a thought - have you tried finding a trainer to come in and work underneath you as the barn manager? I would think, if you could find the right person, that you would be able to maintain control that way, but the trainer still makes their money....saves you work too in retirement age....

    Best of luck!!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Question. You say you have your own horse there. How is it that you didn't notice the place going to hell in a handbasket before now? Why didn't you say something long before everything was trashed? Certainly there must be something in the lease about normal upkeep. I don't understand this "sudden" discovery that your property is now a dump.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2012
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Question. You say you have your own horse there. How is it that you didn't notice the place going to hell in a handbasket before now? Why didn't you say something long before everything was trashed? Certainly there must be something in the lease about normal upkeep. I don't understand this "sudden" discovery that your property is now a dump.
    I have noticed it and I have been trying to repair and do maintenance all the time, but I don't go poking around inside the barn on a daily basis, because it is her business after all.
    My horses are on another part of the farm, not near the big barn.

    Her horses literally run through fencing on a weekly basis, mainly because she turns them out at night on dry lots with nothing to do but try to get to the grass on the other side. I have put up hot wire and bought solar chargers and her workers have unplugged them and I've reconnected and so on and so forth. I babysit on a daily basis. It just doesn't sink in. She
    refuses to keep the hot wire hooked up because she says her students get shocked, etc. Stupid stuff. They will turn water on in the stalls and leave it dripping all night and can't figure out why the stalls are flooded.

    Her workers break my light fixtures regularly, all the globes are broken with bare bulbs over the horses heads.

    The office has spider webs all over and trash falling out of trash cans onto the floor. I could go on and on and I know it sounds stupid that it has gone on this long, but I also have a husband that only sees $$ signs and is almost never out on the farm, as he has his own business that keeps him busy.
    I have sent notices up the ying yang and things will get better for awhile, but starts all over again. So, it is time for her to leave. She does pay the bill right on time, so I am chucking it away, so I can afford to pay my bills until I can get something else going here that will bring in some income.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2012
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by babyeventer23 View Post
    I really don't understand people not taking care of farms. I rent our facility, and we have added a TON to the property from when we started a year ago. I would kill to get my hands on something with better pastures - we babysit the grass we do have like crazy. To me, that's just basic farm management. How disappointing, that you haven't found someone to take care of it.

    Just a thought - have you tried finding a trainer to come in and work underneath you as the barn manager? I would think, if you could find the right person, that you would be able to maintain control that way, but the trainer still makes their money....saves you work too in retirement age....

    Best of luck!!
    I have done that in the past, but trainers don't want to do barn work, they are too busy if they are good. I don't want to start all over again and hire a lot of staff and as I said, I can't physically do it myself on a daily basis.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mylilalter View Post
    I have noticed it and I have been trying to repair and do maintenance all the time, but I don't go poking around inside the barn on a daily basis, because it is her business after all.
    My horses are on another part of the farm, not near the big barn.

    Her horses literally run through fencing on a weekly basis, mainly because she turns them out at night on dry lots with nothing to do but try to get to the grass on the other side. I have put up hot wire and bought solar chargers and her workers have unplugged them and I've reconnected and so on and so forth. I babysit on a daily basis. It just doesn't sink in. She
    refuses to keep the hot wire hooked up because she says her students get shocked, etc. Stupid stuff. They will turn water on in the stalls and leave it dripping all night and can't figure out why the stalls are flooded.

    Her workers break my light fixtures regularly, all the globes are broken with bare bulbs over the horses heads.

    The office has spider webs all over and trash falling out of trash cans onto the floor. I could go on and on and I know it sounds stupid that it has gone on this long, but I also have a husband that only sees $$ signs and is almost never out on the farm, as he has his own business that keeps him busy.
    I have sent notices up the ying yang and things will get better for awhile, but starts all over again. So, it is time for her to leave. She does pay the bill right on time, so I am chucking it away, so I can afford to pay my bills until I can get something else going here that will bring in some income.
    I do feel sorry for you, but at the same time this is blatantly your own fault. Regardless of this "being the trainer's business", it's still YOUR PROPERTY, & you have had every right to ensure that it was being treated with respect. Obviously, you weren't very into enforcing that respect, & now you're whining/venting about what it's going to take to put the place back into shape.

    "The office has spider webs all over and trash falling out of trash cans onto the floor. I could go on and on and I know it sounds stupid that it has gone on this long. . .". This alone shows that you've known about the neglect for a long time, but simply didn't want to bother dealing with it. And now you have to.

    Again - I do feel sorry for you. But sympathy? None.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2012
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    I do feel sorry for you, but at the same time this is blatantly your own fault. Regardless of this "being the trainer's business", it's still YOUR PROPERTY, & you have had every right to ensure that it was being treated with respect. Obviously, you weren't very into enforcing that respect, & now you're whining/venting about what it's going to take to put the place back into shape.

    "The office has spider webs all over and trash falling out of trash cans onto the floor. I could go on and on and I know it sounds stupid that it has gone on this long. . .". This alone shows that you've known about the neglect for a long time, but simply didn't want to bother dealing with it. And now you have to.

    Again - I do feel sorry for you. But sympathy? None.
    I don't recall asking for sympathy, so if you don't want to give it, no problem. I asked for advise on re-entering the business at my age. I don't feel sorry for myself so no need for you to.
    She honestly doesn't see that she is a slob and believe it or not, she is a very good trainer that some hunter people on this board may even recognize her name.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    814

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    I do feel sorry for you, but at the same time this is blatantly your own fault. Regardless of this "being the trainer's business", it's still YOUR PROPERTY, & you have had every right to ensure that it was being treated with respect. Obviously, you weren't very into enforcing that respect, & now you're whining/venting about what it's going to take to put the place back into shape.

    "The office has spider webs all over and trash falling out of trash cans onto the floor. I could go on and on and I know it sounds stupid that it has gone on this long. . .". This alone shows that you've known about the neglect for a long time, but simply didn't want to bother dealing with it. And now you have to.

    Again - I do feel sorry for you. But sympathy? None.
    Have you ever been a landlord? It's not so cut and dry. Good tenants are few and far between and sometimes the devil you know is better than the devil you don't know. Especially with one who is paying bills on time.

    Very few tenants will treat a rented property with care. There's a reason there is that saying, "beaten like a rented Mule." If you need the rental income to cover carrying costs it can be hard to kick a tenant out without certainty on how long it would take to replace them.

    Also it's not that easy to just up and Evict people. Depending on your state and contract it can be a very lengthy process. Maybe commercial leases are different from residential leases but the OP has my sympathy because I know from the residential side how difficult being a land lord can be.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by showhorsegallery View Post
    Have you ever been a landlord? It's not so cut and dry. Good tenants are few and far between and sometimes the devil you know is better than the devil you don't know. Especially with one who is paying bills on time.

    Very few tenants will treat a rented property with care. There's a reason there is that saying, "beaten like a rented Mule." If you need the rental income to cover carrying costs it can be hard to kick a tenant out without certainty on how long it would take to replace them.

    Also it's not that easy to just up and Evict people. Depending on your state and contract it can be a very lengthy process. Maybe commercial leases are different from residential leases but the OP has my sympathy because I know from the residential side how difficult being a land lord can be.
    I can see that if you're an absentee landlord, but the OP has her own horse on the property so has seen the place go from bad to worse on a daily basis without doing anything but sending a few notices that she obviously never followed up on. Sorry, but her own negligence has put her in this situation.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2012
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by showhorsegallery View Post
    Have you ever been a landlord? It's not so cut and dry. Good tenants are few and far between and sometimes the devil you know is better than the devil you don't know. Especially with one who is paying bills on time.

    Very few tenants will treat a rented property with care. There's a reason there is that saying, "beaten like a rented Mule." If you need the rental income to cover carrying costs it can be hard to kick a tenant out without certainty on how long it would take to replace them.

    Also it's not that easy to just up and Evict people. Depending on your state and contract it can be a very lengthy process. Maybe commercial leases are different from residential leases but the OP has my sympathy because I know from the residential side how difficult being a land lord can be.
    Thank you! It is difficult to just throw a family out on the street and also 20 horses. It takes time and I am an ethical person. I do have a heart, although it gets me in trouble sometimes.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2012
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    I can see that if you're an absentee landlord, but the OP has her own horse on the property so has seen the place go from bad to worse on a daily basis without doing anything but sending a few notices that she obviously never followed up on. Sorry, but her own negligence has put her in this situation.
    I have to give notice to enter her leased property. I have followed up on every notice I have sent her, but it starts all over again. That is why I will be giving her notice. I know you would just throw a 3 yr old child onto the street and all the horses, but sorry, I can't and like I said, that was not the intent of this thread.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    814

    Default

    It is probably too late to do anything about the current tenant depending on your contract but in the future there are some steps you can take to protect yourself from this happening again with new tenants. OR renegotiate your contract with the current tenant.

    You have to expect some wear and tear with any rental. You should budget to put aside a portion of each month's rent into a repair fund - maybe 15%. Pretend like this money does not exist and once a year do maintenance repairs with this fund.

    Don't rent to anyone who won't give a security deposit. For a property like this I would get more than one month's rent a security deposit. If they don't have it all on hand allow the tenant to make payments towards the security deposit over a few months.

    Take pictures before a new tenant moves in of EVERYTHING and do a quarterly inspection. In the contract stipulate what the penalties are for the tenant not keeping up with basic maintenance or for causing damage as discovered at these quarterly inspections. Also stipulate what type of basic cleaning is necessary or maybe even go so far as to make it a stipulation of the contract that a cleaning and/or maintenance service comes out at regular intervals. This might be a good way to go if you want to try to keep the current tenant. They can stay BUT only if they pay for regular cleaning and maintenance service (they have to give you the money and you hire the service to ensure it actually happens).



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2003
    Location
    Home of "The Office", PA
    Posts
    942

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mylilalter View Post
    I know you would just throw a 3 yr old child onto the street and all the horses, but sorry, I can't and like I said, that was not the intent of this thread.
    I certainly would have no qualms about it in this case. It sounds like you have told your tenant time and time again about the issues and she has given you the perverbial finger every time. Maybe you are a push-over. Maybe she is stubborn and a slob by nature.

    What would worry me is dealing with someone has no regard toward keeping up appearances which is terribly unprofessional. Take a good hard look at the place. If you were an outsider, would YOU keep your horse there?

    Also, what is the key phrase here on COTH? What does the contract say? Is there anything in there about expectations on her keeping the place in good working order?
    The only thing the government needs to solve all of its problems is a Council of Common Sense.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    992

    Default

    Get a realtor involved; perhaps you can subdivide the property to make it more marketable.

    Given the condition of the barn/fence, what does the house look like at this late date?
    JB-Infinity Farm
    www.infinitehorses.com



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