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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
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    171

    Default Collateral Ligament Injury WWYD

    Got xrays last week. My mare has an l. hind collateral ligament injury. This is right at the point the ligament meets the bone. It must be an old injury. Shes gotten slowly worse over the last year or so. I had the vet do some flexion tests when she would come out for shots etc. nothing ever showed up when she was out. Till now. She also has navicular in both fronts, and was treated for lyme a year ago (at the time we thought the hind end issue could be associated with lyme.)

    Ive got a few choices:
    Steroid injections into her fetlock
    Tildren IV (vet is only willing to do this once a year)
    Shock wave therapy (the latter two options will cost about 1k each in total)

    My vet consulted with surgeons at both New Bolton and Mid Atlantic. One vet suggested a bone infection from a foreign body, but my vet thinks that's very unlikely.

    While I'm more concerned with results then cost, I'm not made of money. This is a pasture puff (out 24/7), but shes very uncomfortable all around at the moment. I'm thinking shock wave will specifically treat the injury, but Tildren could also help her navicular as well as her l. hind injury. Im a little more leaning to shock wave right now. I think if the option I choose doesn't work, Ill may go with steroids in her hind and while we're at it in her coffins up front.

    So, what would you do? Any success or failure stories to share?



  2. #2
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    Apr. 17, 2012
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    Default

    How old is your mare? She has such a laundry-list of issues here, all of them painful, that managing her is basically just shuffling the compensations. The treatments you name are going to run up a bill in the thousands that might be much better spent horse-hunting for a nice prospect you can ride.

    I'm not meaning to be unkind--just realistic. If she's past 25, I'd say "walk me out in the morning dew" is the best solution for all.



  3. #3
    SonnyandLacy is offline Working Hunter
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    Default

    I currently have a riding horse as well, so that's not really an issue for me. I'm not trying to get her sound to ride anymore. Plus shes a crazy bat if you try to ride her anyway.

    I understand the treatment is going to be expensive. My vet wanted to make all the costs clear to me when we discussed options. I'm estimating around 1k or so this year, excluding the xrays/block/flexon I just got. I had a suggestion to just inject with steroids but I feel a little guilty not trying something else first, especially since shes so young (14) and I do have a little money set aside for occasions like this.



  4. #4
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    Jan. 22, 2006
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    Default

    I don't know, I am not a person to spend a fortune on a pasture horse that has little hope of returning to being a riding horse. Have NSAIDs helped the horse? I might try an injection and back it up with NSAIDs if they are a good option and keep the horse happy as long as possible and once they would need too many NSAIDs give the horse a painless ending. That is JMO I know plenty of people willing to do more just for a pasture puff, and I am in no way saying bute the horse up and ride it! I am just saying make it comfortable living outside at a lower cost.



  5. #5
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Default

    At this point I may just inject her coffins and try previcoxx see if that helps.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2011
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    Default

    I would do steroids for now and consider other less invasive options before she gets too uncomfortable again to try and extend he intervals between injections.



  7. #7
    SonnyandLacy is offline Working Hunter
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    There really aren't many less invasive options left at this point. Ive been buteing her for years. Its really not working to well, unless I give her a huge dose. And the barn manager is worried about ulcers now. We've been at the point of lets bute her to make her more comfortable for a few years, and its not working anymore. I feel like its past the point of NSAIDS, unless we get something really strong. BO suggested surpass, but I don't know how deep it would reach.

    The mare was tripping over her l. hind when vet was out. She seemed to be bending her toe into the ground to the point i thought she might catch a hole and trip. With my luck the steroids wont even work, and Ill end up having to do something else anyway. I think my vet is only willing to do steroid injections 1-2x per year.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2008
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    Default

    Unfortuneately I had to deal with the same injury in the right hind. Like yours, it was probably from an old injury. Horse slowly came back w/ stall rest, limited turnout, walking, then trotting, etc. He was on Previcox which worked great. I was excited about the recovery, as US showed the tear had healed, and the leg looked great. Fast forward a year later, horse reinjured the leg again. After x-rays and US, the vet said the best I could hope for would be light riding, as in w/t and trail riding. This horse had such a bright future as an eventer. I knew I could not sell him because people would be scared of the leg issue, so I found a great home for him. The young girl adores him. I had spent a lot of money and time on this horse, and I don't regret it at all, but in the end, I felt letting him go to someone who adored him was the right thing to do. I didn't want him to go to someone who would cowboy him around because he didn't look lame. Good luck, it's a crap shoot.



  9. #9
    SonnyandLacy is offline Working Hunter
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    Thanks. I don't know if I could even give this mare away if I wanted to. I discussed stall rest with my vet. Thought it might be worth a try, but with the navicular she gets pretty sore upfront not moving around. My vet said she would probably just be more stressed in a stall, and I agree, especially since she'd be the only horse in the barn.

    This mare is also on Pentosan. Not sure if I see much result but its so cheep per dose I'm just going to keep giving it.



  10. #10
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    Feb. 13, 2011
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SonnyandLacy View Post
    There really aren't many less invasive options left at this point. Ive been buteing her for years. Its really not working to well, unless I give her a huge dose. And the barn manager is worried about ulcers now. We've been at the point of lets bute her to make her more comfortable for a few years, and its not working anymore. I feel like its past the point of NSAIDS, unless we get something really strong. BO suggested surpass, but I don't know how deep it would reach.

    The mare was tripping over her l. hind when vet was out. She seemed to be bending her toe into the ground to the point i thought she might catch a hole and trip. With my luck the steroids wont even work, and Ill end up having to do something else anyway. I think my vet is only willing to do steroid injections 1-2x per year.

    Rule number one: 'Do no harm.' When I can no longer manage pain wih a reasonable amount of effort and minimal damage to the animal, I chose to euthanize.



  11. #11
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    Apr. 17, 2012
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    Default

    Please read this:

    http://www.aaep.org/health_articles_view.php?id=108

    And consider carefully . . .

    Best of luck,



  12. #12
    SonnyandLacy is offline Working Hunter
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    Default

    I think my vet would refuse to put my mare down right now, if I discussed it or even wanted to do it. I have made that call before. She's not at that point.



  13. #13
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    May. 30, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SonnyandLacy View Post
    I think my vet would refuse to put my mare down right now, if I discussed it or even wanted to do it. I have made that call before. She's not at that point.
    Please read the AAEP guidelines again. Years of daily NSAIDs that are no longer working is reason enough.

    I don't mean to sound harsh and completely understand how hard it is but perhaps it's you that are not ready to let go?

    Never had a vet refuse to euthanize an animal when I've requested it. They know I didn't arrive at such a decision lightly or as a matter of convenience.

    Good luck to you and your horse.



  14. #14
    SonnyandLacy is offline Working Hunter
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    I'm not interested in discussing euthanasia. Its not something I'm willing to consider, when she could potentially be pasture sound with treatment.



  15. #15
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    Dec. 2, 2010
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by SonnyandLacy View Post
    I'm not interested in discussing euthanasia. Its not something I'm willing to consider, when she could potentially be pasture sound with treatment.
    Sometimes euthanasia is the only choice when pain meds no longer work. Sorry just not fair to the horse to be in pain 24/7. Sometimes all the treatments in the world just wont make a diffrence.

    So think about your horse and her quality of life there comes a time we have to say good bye. Been there done that not easy but i cant stand seeing my animals suffer.

    Sometimes no matter how much we spend they just cant be fixed.



  16. #16
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    Feb. 18, 2008
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    Default

    I'm all for trying all available (and affordable) options before considering euthanasia. If the vet thinks that injections fore and aft would help make her comfortable, and if you can afford it, I say why not try them? If you see no improvement, then try the next treatment on the list. I'm not saying to run down the whole list & run out of money, but as you've said, you're not ready to consider euthanasia. So maybe try what the vet thinks is most likely to help. Good luck~
    Whatever you do, or dream you can, begin it; Boldness has genius, magic, and power in it ~ Goethe



  17. #17
    SonnyandLacy is offline Working Hunter
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    Default

    I'm all for trying all available (and affordable) options before considering euthanasia. If the vet thinks that injections fore and aft would help make her comfortable, and if you can afford it, I say why not try them? If you see no improvement, then try the next treatment on the list. I'm not saying to run down the whole list & run out of money, but as you've said, you're not ready to consider euthanasia. So maybe try what the vet thinks is most likely to help. Good luck~
    This is exactly my plan Just talked to the vet. Going with shock wave for 3 treatments. If I don't see results in a few months, I will have her inject.



  18. #18
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    Jan. 22, 2006
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    Default

    I guess maybe I am confused, is she lame from an acute injury or chronic? Or both? I know that a gram or 2 of bute a day will not cover up a serious acute injury and would pursue treatment for an acute injury, but if the bute is not helping the navicular that is a different story, and to me that sounds like the issue.

    ETA I went back and reread the OP, how old does the vet think the collateral ligament injury is? Has it been ultra sounded? If he is talking over a year old I would be very cautious that it is not going to heal.



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