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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2003
    Location
    Aberdeen, NC, USA
    Posts
    3,752

    Default RIP Phoenix

    Lightening took our beloved Phoenix the other night - a very tragic loss. You old-timers might remember that Phoenix was our 'introduction' to driving; he was the horse who started us on this adventure. I began driving him only to have my husband decide it was too much fun and I 'lost' my horse (but went on to discover Polish Driving Ponies ). Hubby then went on to pair Phoenix with his daughter Mehru and what a lovely pair they were. With the loss of Phoenix Joe will go back to driving a single - Mehru.

    It just seems so unfair as we lost Phoenix's sire, Pikor, in a tragic accident at the age of 12; Phoenix was 13. We had put Mehru up for sale but thankfully nothing had been finalized so we'll still have a Pikor baby to drive. Seems strange only seeing two big horses in the pasture, though, after so many years of running 20 to 30 head.
    Pat Belskie - ASHEMONT Farm

    http://www.ashemont.com
    Ashemont2@gmail.com



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Sunny SC
    Posts
    402

    Default

    So terribly sorry for your loss. I worry about all the lightning in the bad pop-up storms in our area every day.

    Gallop on, Phoenix.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    6,949

    Default

    Oh Pat, how sorry I am to hear this! Besides the loss of fun, he was totally a family member for you folks. So hard to lose the good ones. Just don't know how to express my deep sympathy to you guys.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2007
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    159

    Default

    I am so sorry for your loss. We had a terrific storm here two nights ago (first rain in weeks) and feared for ours.. very sad to lose one in his prime.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2011
    Location
    East Longmeadow, MA
    Posts
    2,860

    Default

    So very sorry for your loss.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 27, 2004
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,112

    Default

    Very sorry, Pat. Phoenix was a lovely boy.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2011
    Location
    texas
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Godspeed Phoenix.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    5,413

    Default

    My sincerest sympathy --
    PennyG



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2003
    Location
    Aberdeen, NC, USA
    Posts
    3,752

    Default

    The scary thing about this is that there is no way to protect against lightening. I checked with my good friend, Dr. Rebecca Gimenez of TLAER (Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue) , and she confirmed this. Stalled in or turned out seems to make no difference. My horses are used to being out with a shelter to go in as they choose; to have stalled them in, especially in a violent storm, would've caused panic and most likely injury. And when a barn gets hit and goes up in flames, many lives are lost.

    It was some comfort to know that we had Phoenix in the best situation possible; it's just sad that it wasn't good enough to save him.
    Pat Belskie - ASHEMONT Farm

    http://www.ashemont.com
    Ashemont2@gmail.com



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 27, 2004
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,112

    Default

    A friend at our barn lost a horse to a lightning strike and the horse was in her stall at the time. You couldn't have done anything better than you did. It was just one of those very sad occurences.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    159

    Default

    Hugs to you. There was nothing you could do, and it was not your fault.

    We had a dog struck by lighning 3 years ago and though it was terrible our paddock with our 2 ponies in it was just feet from him. It could have easily have hit one of them.

    How devistating for you and your family....I'm truly sorry for your loss.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2006
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    176

    Default

    Hugs to you and Joe. So very, very sorry for your loss of Phoenix. Michael asked me to pass along his condolences also. We both really admired him. He was amazing in person and such a presence. I will miss the photos of him and Joe. :-(

    Pam



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2007
    Posts
    3,528

    Default

    I am sorry for your loss. It seems a lot of horses this year are being lost to lightening.

    There is a discussion about lightening in Around the farm, Lightening rods and how to protect your electrical chargers are discussed.
    Last edited by fivehorses; Jul. 27, 2012 at 05:46 AM.
    save lives...spay/neuter/geld



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2011
    Posts
    333

    Default

    That's horrible. I'm so sorry for your loss.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2005
    Location
    Oxford, USA
    Posts
    3,624

    Default

    What sad news! You gave him a great life, and he was lucky to have you. RIP Phoenix!
    Anne
    -------
    "Where knowledge ends violence begins." B. Ljundquist



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2009
    Posts
    429

    Default

    I am so sorry for your loss. I too live in fear of losing a horse to lightning. Our house and land is on top of a steep hill and we've had direct strikes on the property. Luckily all we've lost so far is a cheap fuse for the well pump, but every storm finds me holding my breath.

    Rebecca



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    6,949

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RMJacobs View Post
    I am so sorry for your loss. I too live in fear of losing a horse to lightning. Our house and land is on top of a steep hill and we've had direct strikes on the property. Luckily all we've lost so far is a cheap fuse for the well pump, but every storm finds me holding my breath.

    Rebecca
    Have you tried planting some Black Walnut trees up on the high ground? Local country/farmer lore says you plant the Black Walnuts to DRAW the lightning away from home and barn during a storm. Trees do get pretty tall, and are supposedly "oily" wood which is a reason they attract lightning.

    Truth or legend, most old farmsteads locally, around many parts of the Midwest, have a couple strategically placed Black Walnuts just a bit higher, AWAY from the buildings. If the older farm folks are still there, they will often tell you that the Black Walnut trees HAVE taken a strike or two over the years.

    If you plan to stay a while, planting a couple Black Walnuts away from the horses, could be an idea to try out. Sure wouldn't HURT anything to have them up on the top of the hill to get struck! Our neighbor has the Black Walnuts in his yard across the street. We get the possible lightning benefits, without having the leaves and nuts!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2009
    Posts
    429

    Default

    Goodhors, thanks for the suggestion, but I'd be surprised if they would grow in this climate and elevation and without irrigation. We are dry, dry, dry, and the only tree that grows naturally on our land is Ponderosa pine (luckily we have lots of those--about 60 or so). Our covenants prohibit landscaping and irrigation, although that doesn't seem to stop my neighbors. But when we moved here, we felt we agreed to the covenants and it's not right to violate them. Plus our well won't support irrigation (and that is the new well that we just drilled less than two years ago).

    Life is definitely different at 6,200 feet and with very little rainfall.

    It's funny--we have a neighbor with a fruit orchard (don't know what they are thinking to try to do that). And we wonder why we had to drill a deeper well. We are live and let live type of people, so we would never try to take legal action for all the violations around here, even though they have a profound impact on aquifer levels for everyone. But it really makes me wonder why people choose to live in a place like this and then try to turn it into the East or Midwest.

    Rebecca



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    6,949

    Default

    Oh well, maybe someone else can use the Black Walnut tree tip in their locations. Save a horse or barn with it.

    I never could figure why people want to make a new location into what they just left!? Seems like you should adapt to the new place and its limits, enjoy it's unique characteristics, even if it is not what you are used to.

    Maybe being dry, you could ask about lightning rods for the hill top, with a good grounding system to drain off the energy.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2009
    Posts
    429

    Default

    What's interesting is that Colorado State University lists Black Walnut trees as a good tree for low water conditions. But they do say you need to give them a good start.

    I also don't get why people want to transform a place--choose what you like and live there!

    Rebecca



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