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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2012
    Posts
    20

    Default Can anyone suggest a reputable pony trainer in the Sacramento area?

    I have a 12.3 hh pony that I would like to get going in the hunter ring. I have been contacting H/J trainers in the area and they are well known but they don't train ponies. I ride, but I am not experienced enough to jump, and have it look good enough for upper level shows or rated shows. I would like to campaign my pony next spring, Leone's Brookside, Murrietta, etc. but I don't want to show the pony myself. I won't be ready. The pony jumps but needs more finishing and would like to send him to a trainer over the winter. Anyone know of any "good" trainers in the sacramento area that train ponies? I don't want children training my pony, I want the adult trainer to train the pony. Am I asking too much? Very new to the pony world and not sure how one gets a green pony hunter to seasoned veteran status in the rated world. I would like to campaign my pony under an adult not with children -- any recommendations?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2011
    Posts
    350

    Default

    I do not have any trainer suggestions as I am on the east coast, but do realize that the pony hunter divisions at rated shows are open only to junior (child) riders. It is not really possible for an adult to show a pony hunter to "veteran status." If you want to pay to have the pony campaigned at rated shows, your best bet would be to find a barn that has pros small enough to school your pony behind the scenes and a good riding "pony jock" kid who is experienced enough to take him into the show ring when he is ready.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2011
    Posts
    620

    Default

    That is a tall order for the area. A few things to keep in mind: 12.3 hh is extremely small, you will have a very hard time finding an adult trainer who is small enough to put rides on the pony
    Ponies are not a very lucrative market for the area, ponies out west don't command the, prices, I guess? following? they seem to back east, so finding a barn that specializes in ponies will be dificult (if not impossible, I am racking my brains and cannot think of a strictly pony barn or even one with a heavy focus on pony showing in the area)
    Adults cannot show in the pony divisions, so you will have to find a barn with a very good pony jock to show the pony (and, possibly, to train it, because you may not find a trainer who will do the rides)

    Basically, the point of all this is that you may need to be a little bit more flexible with your criteria if you want to find a match.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2011
    Posts
    115

    Default

    The only pony show barn I know of around Sac is Toile Farms in Davis, but I would not recommend their trainer. Have you called anyone in the Bay Area?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2007
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA
    Posts
    1,247

    Default

    Check out Joey Pedroni Stables. They have kids that do ponies. It is about 1 1/2 hours from Sacramento.

    Joey Pedroni Stables
    49 Jewett Road
    Petaluma, California 94952
    Joey Pedroni Stables 707-792-2900
    E-mail: joeypedroni@yahoo.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,449

    Default

    I sold my fancy large to Sami Milo at Cavallo Stables. She is doing an OUTSTANDING job with him. I dont know how many other ponies she does- but shes great- great facility, etc.
    http://www.cavallostables.com/
    "If you are nervous you arent focused-if you are focused, there is no room for nerves!"




  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2003
    Location
    Redmond, WA
    Posts
    1,915

    Default

    No pony trainers there. Try Millennium Farm or Beverly Jovais in the Bay Area. Maybe they could get your pony measured a small, too.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2012
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Thanks for the replies... Obviously I'm really green in the english world. Always done western reining events and such. Didn't even realize that ponies need to be ridden by juniors at rated level. What about jumpers? Does it have to be a child or can an adult show in jumpers on a pony?

    I've been riding for 22 years, always western performance events. Taking lessons for hunters developing my two point so I am not going to be the one showing just yet. I ride the lesson horses and the trainer hasn't met the pony yet. Don't think she will since she herself doesn't do ponies, so there's really no point. Haven't asked her many questions about pony divisions since I'm not going to put the pony in training with her. Have been sifting through reputable trainers' sites locally and nobody seems to do ponies but will look into the suggestions above. Bay area really isn't too far, and having a child show for me isn't out of the question from what you guys say. Was influenced by friends that I don't want a child riding/training him for me. But they are of the western discipline as I am. I am so new to the english world I feel like I am starting over.

    I have always liked jumping but never done it. Found a really nice pony who seems athletic enough, wanted to campaign him for fun/hobby. I know it takes years to develop them properly, but I think by the time I am ready/able to compete with him and look 'not so green" he will need to be experienced, so that's why I asked the question for a reputable trainer, but not have kids make him arena sour or full of bad habits. Sounds like that may not be the case if there are really good children riders out there that are working with trainers.

    The plan is to take "green rideable pony" to a trainer, show him under a trainer for a year or two??, then when I am ready to ride over fences and he's a steady competitor, we compete together. Maybe it's a crazy dream, but it's on my bucket list so to speak. I would like to jump, or do hunters, but I don't have the guts at 43 to fly over fences on a WB, so chose a pony. So am I crazy?

    Thanks for the suggestions, will look into them.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2003
    Location
    Redmond, WA
    Posts
    1,915

    Default

    Why don't you buy a trained pony that fits your riding ability? Making up a green one is going to cost $$$. Good barns run $1,500 month, plus at least that per show. A green pony is going to need one week long show a month, or more, to get them going. You keep it at the trainers for say, 18 months, and you are in $27K before showing costs.

    Also, there aren't that many classes for adults on ponies at the H/J shows. You can do the open classes. Technically you can do the Adult Hunters at 2'6 or 3', but will need to get the horse strides if you expect to win/ribbon. That will involve a big strided 14.2 hand large pony. I grew up in Sacramento and live in Washington state now. Ponies of the size you own jump 2'3. Don't think they have jumpers at that level? Not sure how you would get over the combinations as they are set for horses. I do show our Short Stirrup ponies in the open 2' Hunters as a warm up for the kids. That is an option. I win a lot adding one or two strides in the lines, so no problem there. Those classes usually run on Wed/Thurs and you compete against the professionals.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2011
    Location
    Cheney, WA
    Posts
    541

    Default

    I am in a similar boat as I have a 12.1-2ish pony. I'm looking at working with Yasmin at Blue Water Horses up here in Placerville, but I'm only looking for lessons not for training. She seems like she has a decent # of pony kids which seems like she would be good with ponies. I think her assistant is a decent size to ride ponies but I'm not positive. I know she had had a similar sized pony not too long ago. The problem with the trainer doing the riding is they have to be able to fit on the smaller ponies like ours. A competent junior riding with the trainer instructing wouldn't bother me too much if the trainer can't physically ride the pony. I'm looking to get mine going and go to local shows initially to get her out. I figure I can try pony jumpers, that will be a piece of cake for her. I'm up for taking her into courses at the local shows but will have to see about the upper shows. I figure if I'm working with someone that has a good amount of pony kids I will have some one kind of built in to ride once I get her where I'm comfortable having someone else hop on. I would definitely take mine into regular jumper classes, she does 3'4 easily. http://www.bluewaterhorses.com/

    Someone else to try would be Amy at Northern Oaks Equine in Galt. She may be able to ride a pony of that size. Worth a shot! She will be going to all the shows you are talking about with her show team. If Kirby is going well we might tag along in Oct. http://www.northernoaksequine.com/



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2005
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Based on your posts, I would recommend forgetting about a pony all together and getting yourself a horse. An experienced horse, as LovesHorses recommended for a pony. The quickest way to gain confidence when learning to jump as an adult is to learn on an experienced animal. One of the worst feelings I remember having is being unsure that my horse could make it down the lines in the correct number of strides, or that it didn't have the scope to get me out of trouble if I made a mistake. Get a horse with a big enough stride to make it down the lines easily, and step over the jumps for you. You don't need to think "big warmblood" if that intimidates you. There are plenty of smaller horses that may go for lesser prices simply because many people want a bigger animal. Look for a good disposition and something suitable to learn how to jump on. Perhaps put off the buying decision for another year or two and continue your lessons until you are more experienced with jumping/english riding. If you buy something that is suitable for you today, you may need to sell it in a few years if you continue to take lessons, as you get better and more experienced with jumping.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2003
    Location
    Redmond, WA
    Posts
    1,915

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kato View Post
    Based on your posts, I would recommend forgetting about a pony all together and getting yourself a horse. An experienced horse, as LovesHorses recommended for a pony. The quickest way to gain confidence when learning to jump as an adult is to learn on an experienced animal. One of the worst feelings I remember having is being unsure that my horse could make it down the lines in the correct number of strides, or that it didn't have the scope to get me out of trouble if I made a mistake. Get a horse with a big enough stride to make it down the lines easily, and step over the jumps for you. You don't need to think "big warmblood" if that intimidates you. There are plenty of smaller horses that may go for lesser prices simply because many people want a bigger animal. Look for a good disposition and something suitable to learn how to jump on. Perhaps put off the buying decision for another year or two and continue your lessons until you are more experienced with jumping/english riding. If you buy something that is suitable for you today, you may need to sell it in a few years if you continue to take lessons, as you get better and more experienced with jumping.
    Bingo!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,616

    Default

    pm sent



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2008
    Posts
    118

    Default

    Oh poohey. You're not crazy. Ponies are fun. And cute.

    Is the pony a Welsh or part-bred Welsh? Regardless, you might want to check out the Welsh Pony and Cob Society's list of Breeders in California. Someone on that list might work for you, or might be able to suggest a trainer. I am nowhere near California, so I have no idea if the California Welsh people go to hunter shows, but they have hunter classes at the Welsh shows that adults can ride in. And other English, western, trail, halter, driving, etc, classes. Welsh shows are fun, low key, and perfect for green ponies. Although, your pony would have to be registered or able to be registered as at least a part-bred Welsh (one full Welsh grandparent) to show at these shows.

    http://www.welshpony.org/welshpony/b...category&id=79

    One CA Welsh breeder I don't see on the above list is Farmore Farms. They've produced some lovely hunter ponies: http://farmore.homestead.com/

    As others have said, though, if your goal is the rated USEF shows, 12.3 hands is a very undesirable measurement.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,616

    Default

    12.3 hands is a very undesirable measurement.
    depending on age of the pony, this may only be temporary



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2011
    Location
    Cheney, WA
    Posts
    541

    Default

    Yes, Farmore is in Wilton I believe. There are one or two Welsh shows at Brookside every year. There is another one coming up in Oct. I need to send in my pony's info and get her registered (by the way its like half off until like the 24th of this month) and also sign up for my membership. I'm hoping that mine will be ready enough in Oct to maybe go My breeder who is up here in Shingle Springs (BriarFair Welsh Ponies) is a western person so if you decide to call breeders don't bother calling her! But she knew my pony needed to be an english pony and sold her as such.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2003
    Location
    Redmond, WA
    Posts
    1,915

    Default

    Call Tammy at Farmore. My mare is currently in foal to her stallion. She will be most helpful.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2013
    Posts
    10

    Default

    You could take your pony to Kim Rollison in North Sac area, she is only 5'2", 110lbs so she is small enough to ride ponies. She trained the 2012 SAHJA pony medal finals winner and has a few large ponies in her program. If you are small enough you could ride your pony in the long-stirrup division. The fences are only 2'ft and it is acceptable to add a stride when you are riding a pony. Anyone who has shown 3' or higher cannot ride in LS so you wouldnt be competing against the more experienced riders.



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