The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 35
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2008
    Location
    Where The Snow Flies
    Posts
    2,550

    Default What Age to Pick Up Puppy from Breeder?

    So, I'm taking on a new puppy. I can get him this weekend, when he's 8 weeks or wait anytime until he's 12 weeks old. The breeder is retaining several of his litter mates so he will have plenty of pups to play with. Do I wait and let him get well socialized with his brothers and sisters or do I get him home and introduced to me and my dogs right away?
    Last edited by Snowflake; Jul. 29, 2012 at 02:14 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,459

    Default

    There have been several good studies on neurological development in puppies that put the ideal time to leave for a new home in that window, 8-12 weeks.

    I took my puppy home at 11 weeks, because she was going to be an only dog and I wanted a bit more species socialization 24/7.

    Since you have dogs at home already, I would take your puppy now, so it will learn as early as sensibly, 8 weeks, to adapt to your family.

    Each situation is a bit different, good to aim for ideal.
    Life doesn't always work that way and things tend to work out fine anyway.

    Cute puppy, we will need some more pictures, if you have time.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    south Georgia
    Posts
    59

    Default

    I would say at least 8 weeks so I think your fine getting him now. Congrats he is super cute! There's nothing better than a puppy!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,315

    Default

    I have always gotten my puppies between 8 and 9 weeks



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,385

    Default

    I got my cattle dog at 12 weeks, and I think that is a great time because it allows them that extra time to figure the pack stuff out & mature a little more.

    I would prefer to get them at 12 weeks if you can wait.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    4,019

    Default

    My vote is for 12 weeks. We got our BC mix (from rescue not breeder) at 12 weeks last summer. She was with her mother in a pack environment until then. Her doggie social skills are excellent, she has very nice dog manners and we did not have to teach them or spend lots of time trying to socialize her to dogs.

    I believe this came from staying with Mom/sibling and other dogs for that long. When we brought her home, we had no trouble whatsover introducing her to our elderly, grumpy and downright bitchy old ACD. Puppy's manners were so nice to the older dog (did not run up to her, jump on her, etc...approached politely, slowly and deferentially) that the nasty old dog didn't take offense to her at all. DH and my young son REALLY wanted a puppy, but I didn't think old dog would do well with a crazy puppy, so I specifically chose this dog because of her age and the environment she was raised in.

    As a mostly Border Collie mix, the young dog is not lacking in energy and desire to play, she's over the top with it, but she knows how to read dog body language so she knows who DOES NOT want to play and she knows how to ask to play politely and not get other dogs upset.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,681

    Default

    I'd go with 12 weeks. My corgi's breeder wouldn't let any of her puppies go before they were 3 months old. I think it's especially important when they're a smaller breed - if it were a Lab or a shepherd, 8 weeks would be fine. Tribble at 3 months old was the same size Shadow was when he was 2 months old. They're still learning how to be a dog from their mother.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,832

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowflake View Post
    So, I'm taking on a new puppy (see pic below). I can get him this weekend, when he's 8 weeks or wait anytime until he's 12 weeks old. The breeder is retaining several of his litter mates so he will have plenty of pups to play with. Do I wait and let him get well socialized with his brothers and sisters or do I get him home and introduced to me and my dogs right away?
    Well, it depends on many things, but from what you've said, I would say sooner, rather than later. They don't need any more "socializing" with their littermates, they've been doing that for 2 months already. And, in my opinion, puppies aren't necessarily great for socializing each other because they can actually get really rough with each other. What would be more useful is a careful and gentle introduction to other things - house training, riding in a crate in the car, learning to walk on a leash, learning to sleep alone, learning to go to new places, etc.

    If, however, your breeder was doing some of these things -- e.g. crate and house training them, taking them out of their "home" environment, etc. than I would say it wouldn't hurt to leave them for another few weeks. But if he/she is not doing these things, then I would get them now and start working on settling him into your routine.

    I just spent the last 8 weeks working closely with my dog's breeder and her new litter because she was having some medical issues of her own and needed help. One puppy was shyer than the others, and it was *very* noticeable when we took them to the vet for their shots at 7 weeks. What he needed was to start doing a lot more going "out" of the home environment to become more confident...I think it would have been bad to keep him in his litter for another 4 weeks. And, FWIW, even though the mom lived there as well, she really didn't interact with them very much anymore (I mean, she wagged her tail and sniffed them, but she wasn't playing with them). They had all weaned themselves and she spent more of her time with her "grown up" dog buddies than the puppies.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,923

    Default

    I got my pup at 11 weeks. The breeder had taught her how to sit and had crate trained her. It was great to have a crate trained puppy. She had one accident in the house as a puppy, and that was on the first day home. I didn't really do any potty training--it was great.

    Also, if you work during the day, their bladder is a little better at 12 weeks vs 8. I have a friend who got a pup at 8 weeks and is upset about her dog peeing in the kennel and I'm like "duh--it isn't doing it on purpose!"

    Otherwise I've gotten pups at 8 weeks too. Not really a big issue either way for me, but I did have to potty train the 8 week old.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2008
    Location
    Where The Snow Flies
    Posts
    2,550

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    If, however, your breeder was doing some of these things -- e.g. crate and house training them, taking them out of their "home" environment, etc. than I would say it wouldn't hurt to leave them for another few weeks. But if he/she is not doing these things, then I would get them now and start working on settling him into your routine.
    Good point. Her set up is more like a kennel with dog door access to play yards. It's nice - it's off of her home so it's not like it's some dark, dirty place but it may be advantageous to start potty training early and prevent any bad habits.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,471

    Default

    I got Dexter at 14 weeks and I am SO thankful I didn't get him too early. By the time I got him he was confident from exploring new surfaces, animals, people, etc along side his litter mates and he was old enough that he was ready to really learn.

    From the time I got him we only had to deal with 2 accidents before he was potty trained. I don't think this is due to my superior training skills but rather he was at an age where he had both the desire to learn and the physical maturity to hold his bladder.

    The only time I would want a puppy earlier than 12 weeks would be if the breeder did not do a lot of socialization or the puppy seemed timid in which case I would want to do intensive socialization asap.

    I don't think things will go horribly wrong either way so it really depends on your preferences and how soon you want him home.

    What kennel did he come from? His daddy is a looker.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,998

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowflake View Post
    Good point. Her set up is more like a kennel with dog door access to play yards. It's nice - it's off of her home so it's not like it's some dark, dirty place but it may be advantageous to start potty training early and prevent any bad habits.
    I'd pick him up now then as long as you've got the time to spend with him



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2003
    Posts
    331

    Default

    If her set-up is more of a kennel I would definitely say 8 weeks. I got mine at 12 BUT at 8 weeks the breeder split up the litter and sent each puppy that did not go to its new home yet to a different home for a month for socialization. That way they get to play with adult dogs and get more one-on-one socialization and training in a different environment. My puppy spent a month with a dog trainer actually so when I got him he knew sit, stay, come, was almost housebroken, etc. Between 8-12 weeks someone has to make sure the puppy gets exposed to different people, situations, and dogs.

    http://rufflyspeaking.net/blog/how-i...a-pomegranate/



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    1,923

    Default

    8 weeks



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    13,032

    Default

    I'd probably say 10 weeks or so if breeder is doing handling/training with them. If they are left in kennels without intereaction then 8-9 weeks.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    407

    Default

    We are breeders of a small breed and do not even consider letting them go home until they are 10 weeks. We, personally, think 8 weeks is too young for a small breed puppy to go home.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleClick View Post
    We are breeders of a small breed and do not even consider letting them go home until they are 10 weeks. We, personally, think 8 weeks is too young for a small breed puppy to go home.
    I would not consider those a small breed, for that to be relevant.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2000
    Location
    Chesterland, OH USA
    Posts
    2,775

    Default

    My dog's trainer told us that 8-10 weeks is a period of heightened insecurity and does not recommend changing their home at that time.

    Bruno came home at almost 12 weeks and knew sit/crate training and was well socialized with puppies and adult dogs. The breeder's early work was incredibly helpful for us!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    3,676

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Well, it depends on many things, but from what you've said, I would say sooner, rather than later. They don't need any more "socializing" with their littermates, they've been doing that for 2 months already. And, in my opinion, puppies aren't necessarily great for socializing each other because they can actually get really rough with each other. What would be more useful is a careful and gentle introduction to other things - house training, riding in a crate in the car, learning to walk on a leash, learning to sleep alone, learning to go to new places, etc.

    If, however, your breeder was doing some of these things -- e.g. crate and house training them, taking them out of their "home" environment, etc. than I would say it wouldn't hurt to leave them for another few weeks. But if he/she is not doing these things, then I would get them now and start working on settling him into your routine.

    I just spent the last 8 weeks working closely with my dog's breeder and her new litter because she was having some medical issues of her own and needed help. One puppy was shyer than the others, and it was *very* noticeable when we took them to the vet for their shots at 7 weeks. What he needed was to start doing a lot more going "out" of the home environment to become more confident...I think it would have been bad to keep him in his litter for another 4 weeks. And, FWIW, even though the mom lived there as well, she really didn't interact with them very much anymore (I mean, she wagged her tail and sniffed them, but she wasn't playing with them). They had all weaned themselves and she spent more of her time with her "grown up" dog buddies than the puppies.
    Right, there is no formula for when best to start the process of introducing them into the family and many times it is very adverse to keep them with littermates, bullying and hard playing being one of the bigger problems. With toy type dogs it is problematical because of their minute sizes but then, I do not think toy breed dogs are anything but toys, and are an abomination to me. If your puppy has had all of the care taken of a litter that is steered to the show ring, it should not be a problem taking that puppy home now as long as you exercise caution with the exposure of the little one to the outside world. Normal (statistically which does not qualify for an absolute) development of a puppy's immune system (ie not drinking dam's milk, that is weaned) is between 12 - 16 weeks old. Be very attentive to that and keep strangers away and keep the puppy away from social situations which are frequented by a multitude of dogs and people. Remember, one person who has gone to a shelter or dog park and then comes to your house who has not changed clothes and washed hands (that means shoes too) can bring in a wallop of a virus and possibly bacterial infections.
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paddys Mom View Post
    My dog's trainer told us that 8-10 weeks is a period of heightened insecurity and does not recommend changing their home at that time.

    Bruno came home at almost 12 weeks and knew sit/crate training and was well socialized with puppies and adult dogs. The breeder's early work was incredibly helpful for us!
    One of the first fear periods is around 8 weeks, but that will happen if the puppy is still at home or not.
    That one of those periods happens doesn't mean we can't bring new things to the puppy at that time, as the first studies of Pfaffenberg assumed.
    Later those assumptions were challenged.



Similar Threads

  1. Somebody please pick this up!
    By Jumpers4life in forum Dressage
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Jun. 21, 2012, 03:15 PM
  2. Replies: 29
    Last Post: Jun. 9, 2012, 11:39 PM
  3. Help me pick a pic
    By TrinitySporthorses in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Oct. 5, 2011, 01:53 PM
  4. Puppy problems, before we even have the puppy!
    By Maybeapril in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: Oct. 8, 2009, 03:31 AM
  5. Just For Fun -- Who Would You Pick?
    By TKR in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: May. 5, 2008, 06:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •