The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    41

    Lightbulb More advice

    So since I will take all the advice I can get; and everyone's advice on my riding issues seems to help.. On to my next issue. I seem to be swinging my legs to much when I post. So any advice on things I can do when I ride to help solve my problem.. I get two days to ride with out my trainer and those day's I use to work on the issues I had on with my lesson with her. This week was moving my legs to much..

    Thanks so much for all your help...

    I am sorry I keep asking you all for help but I don't really have anyone I can ask for advice..



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2012
    Posts
    18

    Default

    You are putting too much weight in your stirrups. Try posting without stirrups to build up the muscles you need. Feel the burn. It helps!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
    Location
    SW PA
    Posts
    1,755

    Default

    2 point over cavaletti with my arms out to the side like I'm flying helped me with this one.
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,675

    Default

    If its swinging forward as you rise and back when you sit, you're most likely doing two things
    1 putting too much weight into your heels
    2 letting your abdominals get too loose.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    9,898

    Default

    Riding in two point should build the muscles to help you keep your leg still, and steady, quiet unless needed.

    Allowing yourself to fall into chair seat will also cause unsteady legs.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2002
    Location
    Area VIII, Region 2, Zone 5.
    Posts
    6,374

    Default

    Your stirrups may be too long, which causes you to post off your toes. Then you have to pinch with your knees to keep from falling forward. That causes your leg to swing.

    Be sure your stirrups aren't too long. They should hit your ankle bones or just a touch below when you let your legs hang out of the stirrups. Once your stirrups are the correct length, let whatever weight you have in your stirrups fall into your heels as you rise at the trot. That will help stabilize your leg.
    Quote Originally Posted by Linny View Post
    Those martingales were so taut, you could play Ode to Joy on them with a comb



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    204

    Default

    Lots of great ideas here, as usual, which is why I'm a regular. But I'm wondering if/why your trainer doesn't give you "homework" to help with issues that come up during your lessons? My trainer does, and I really appreciate it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    9,898

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonkafriend View Post
    Lots of great ideas here, as usual, which is why I'm a regular. But I'm wondering if/why your trainer doesn't give you "homework" to help with issues that come up during your lessons? My trainer does, and I really appreciate it.
    A lot of trainers can tell you what you are doing wrong.

    It takes a teacher to help fix it. Sometimes it takes more than one approach to solve a problem.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2006
    Posts
    2,528

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    It takes a teacher to help fix it. Sometimes it takes more than one approach to solve a problem.
    Very, very true!
    Sheilah



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    the evergreen state!
    Posts
    1,253

    Default

    i know my lower legs to into full swing when:

    1. my core is not correctly engaged
    2. my hips are too tight
    3. my horse is behind the leg

    and they are all related. when i figure out how to sit right, activate the right muscles and loosen the others- all of a sudden i can make my horse go, the legs look much more still.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2007
    Location
    Western Washington
    Posts
    2,879

    Default

    Or you're fighting your saddle. My legs tend to swing when the stirrup bars are too far forward. Passiers (at least the ones I've tried so far) don't work for me because of this.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    41

    Default

    During my lesson my trainer had me sit differently and it seemed to help.. She already knows that I work on what I had problems with during our lesson.. I take a lesson on Thursday and then work on my problem areas on Monday and Tuesday.

    They seem to swing out to the side when I sit and back and go in when I rise up. I have to keep kicking my horse like every other stride to keep him going. He likes to make you work for everything..But what she had me sit off the back of my butt and only on my thighs (kinda like a half seat) when i sit down during my post and bent my leg a little more and it seemed to help.. My length of my stirrup seems to be fine. It its the ankle bone when I let my legs hang loose..

    My trainer is having me do some no stirrup work to help get my legs and core stronger..



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2006
    Posts
    1,374

    Default

    We already know that you and the saddle do not get along. When someone tells me that they have to kick the horse every other stride, they have just opened a whole new can of worms. Quite likely you are not posting straight up and down (which is difficult if your stirrups are hung too far forward on the saddle and/or the saddle does not fit the horse correctly) and are leaning forward into the post as you rise. When you rise, you are probably curling your toes forward and down over the front edge of your stirrups and allowing your shoulders to fall foward. Then, you are also trying to rise up from the post faster, thinking you will help the horse get going better. Wrong! The emphasis for the posting trot should be on the downward portion as your seat coming into the saddle is what drives the horse's hindquarters forward into your hands. Make the bottom of your post just a tad longer by using your seat to push down into the saddle, just as if it were elastic...like a trampoline. Then, allow the horse to toss you into the rising portion. Do not try to hasten upward.

    Are you riding in a dressage saddle, or is this school saddle something else?



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    41

    Default

    Its an all purpose wintec saddle. Its an old wintec but looks like the wintec 250 all purpose.. I will have a better look at it tomorrow



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2006
    Posts
    1,374

    Default

    An all purpose saddle is ridden with the rider's torso slightly...ever so very slightly forward into the post rather than straight up and down of the dressage saddle. But, many of the other things that I wrote still apply, i.e. the curling toes, the falling shoulders, the slinging of the body off the saddle too fast.

    If you could have a couple of pictures taken, we could better make suggestions.

    Also, bear in mind that an all purpose saddle's balance point is not designed for the sitting trot.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    41

    Default

    I will see if I can find someone to help take pictures



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
    Posts
    7,536

    Default

    you absolutely can sit in an all purpose or a jumping saddle!

    OP my guess is your stirrups are too long, and your leg is rotated out.

    honestly tho, i think you should stick with working with your instructor, and ask him/her questions, because you will get so many differing answers, many of them counter productive and some just plain wrong....



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2000
    Location
    Chantilly,va.
    Posts
    10,786

    Question saddle fit/ position

    does your saddle fit, where is it positioned on the horse?
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2006
    Posts
    1,374

    Default

    Of course you can "sit" any saddle. The questions are: should you, and what does it do to your horse.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    41

    Default

    the saddle fits the horse fine. its been his saddle for years it was bought for him from what I was told. I know its me and my stirrups are fine. I had a few people check for me and they said my stirrup length is great. My trainer does answer most of my questions just the silly odd questions she doesnt tend to answer. But she does answer the important questions. I dont see a problem getting a few opinons on what to do..



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 18
    Last Post: Nov. 27, 2011, 01:06 PM
  2. Need Advice
    By Red Sky in forum Endurance and Trail Riding
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Oct. 16, 2011, 11:40 PM
  3. Jig advice
    By alliekat in forum Dressage
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: Nov. 17, 2008, 09:09 AM
  4. i need advice
    By Caylei in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 121
    Last Post: Mar. 5, 2006, 09:15 AM
  5. Need advice!!
    By FridayzFortune in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 152
    Last Post: Sep. 17, 2004, 06:02 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness