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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
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    SW PA
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    Default 175 FEC to Zero in 4 weeks

    without deworming... Would you say something went wrong at the vets office?
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    Depends - when was the manure sample pulled in relation to the last deworming, and what chemical was used?

    Was the 2nd sample fresh and immediately put in cool storage? This time of year it doesn't take much for a sample to get too warm for too long and have all the eggs hatch out.

    It's also possible to have a false negative at any given time. Routine negatives paint a more accurate picture, assuming proper handling.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
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    SW PA
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    Default

    He was dewormed with QuestPlus 16 weeks ago. Did a FEC 12 weeks later with 175 count strongyles. 4 weeks later this past Friday, the sample was taken from a fresh pile in his stall and taken directly to the vet. It was still warm when they got it.

    Got the call this morning that the count was zero.
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  4. #4
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    It's possible.

    You're just starting down the FEC path with this horse right? I'd probably do another FEC in 10-14 days and see what's what.

    Horses ARE able, to a large degree, control strongyles on their own. It's not out of the question for a given horse to self-care with that load
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Location
    Evansville, Wisconsin
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    Default

    That's actually not as big of a difference as you might think, given that the fecal sample used is generally quite small, and then the number of eggs found is multiplied to estimate the parasite load in a larger quantity of feces.

    For example, here's a link to a description of the McMaster's method: http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/projects/pa...e/mcmaster.htm

    As you can see, since the sample is quite small, you "Multiply the total number of eggs in the 2 chambers by 100, this is the eggs per gram (EPG)"

    So a count of 200 using that method means that there were actually only two eggs observed. Which isn't really that big of a difference from observing no eggs.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2006
    Location
    SW PA
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    Default

    Ah ok.... wow I though I just wasted 20 bucks and was going to bitch at the vets office and make them do another one for free.

    You're right JB I'm just starting down this path with him and I'm SO glad I am. I'm learning alot and feel much better knowing he's not getting dewormed when he doesn't have to be

    I think I'm going to get a cheapo lab kit and learn to do this myself
    Boyle Heights Kid 1998 OTTB Dark Bay Gelding
    Tinner's Way x Sculpture by Hail to Reason
    "Once you go off track, you never go back!"



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Posts
    5,908

    Default

    Also remember a fecal egg count of 175 is really low and one that really shouldn't be worried about. You will never eliminate all the worms from a horse, but it more about keeping their numbers down.

    In the first egg count, you horse had around 3 eggs from the method that I have learned, but I think there are different type of McMaster slides.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2011
    Posts
    1,395

    Default

    Feed can also effect EPG counts. Horses on high quality pastures tend to utilize more of the plant....and pass less stool. At the other end of the spectrum horses eating a lot of lower quality hay are passing more poo with less digestable feeds.

    So if 4 wks ago your horse was eating good pasture (but like mine pasture is all but running out) and now getting more hay. Then the hay easily can be diluting the EPG counts respective to the last count and producing your zero count.



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