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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
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    Northern California
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    985

    Default What is it with buyers not cooling a horse out?

    I'm just curious as to why, when a horse works itself into a sweat with you riding it, do you not feel the urge to properly cool it off- especially when said horse was an absolut angel?? I understand if the horse was being a looky Lou or overly hot, but really if they walk on the buckle with head down and relaxed then why wouldn't you be interested in properly finishing your ride? I get it if you are inexperienced, but if you come with a trainer it speaks volumes of both of you if you pop off and think you can just walk away.... Just saying



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2010
    Location
    PA
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    389

    Default

    Having worked at a large sales barn for many years, I do not expect people to tack up, groom or cool out a sales horse. Some want to and that is fine, but I do not expect it. Many times they are paying a trainer and have several places they need to be to try horses and need to stay on schedule. I try to make the experience as pleasant as possible for people and I do not judge, you never know the circumstances.

    I do get some who want to accompany me to catch horse, etc...but its honestly the minority. Sometimes they come back a second time and want more quality time and sometimes they do not care about anything other than the riding part.

    It is what it is, and I am usually happy if people are coming to try and horse goes well. Selling horses is hard and so is buying them so you have to be flexible.

    Now, if it was my lesson student or boarder I would not be happy!!!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    Rant permitted, but has this been your observation of dozens and dozens of buyers, or just one that got under your skin? I've tried horses and been told "no thank you" when I offered to cool it out or hose it off. Doesn't make me angry at the seller.
    Click here before you buy.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
    Location
    Northern California
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    Default

    I absolutely agree that there are a lot/majority of buyers that want you/owner to catch and tack up and ride first, I am flexible and new to selling- I'm a notorious collector! Lol. The few people I have had out were about 50/50 for 'cooling out' I happen to think that is a great time if you had a good ride to relax and bond. Of the same group of people 50/50 walked right up and started brushing and tacking- although I offered to do this for them, and of course the horse was already groomed well before the buyers arrived. I feel this is also an excellent time to evaluate the horses ground manners and general behavior. I always try to feel out people's comfort level and more detailed riding experience during this time. I just felt the need to rant! Just because I'm selling doesn't mean I'm not going to be picky! Heck, I hate to even sell, but I need to make hubby happy and this was the plan when I got the horse originally.



  5. #5
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    Mar. 30, 2012
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    Northern California
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    Default

    Also the two riders that didn't feel the need to cool off said foamy horse were with their trainers....



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2011
    Posts
    637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HorseKrazy View Post
    I absolutely agree that there are a lot/majority of buyers that want you/owner to catch and tack up and ride first, I am flexible and new to selling- I'm a notorious collector! Lol. The few people I have had out were about 50/50 for 'cooling out' I happen to think that is a great time if you had a good ride to relax and bond. Of the same group of people 50/50 walked right up and started brushing and tacking- although I offered to do this for them, and of course the horse was already groomed well before the buyers arrived. I feel this is also an excellent time to evaluate the horses ground manners and general behavior. I always try to feel out people's comfort level and more detailed riding experience during this time. I just felt the need to rant! Just because I'm selling doesn't mean I'm not going to be picky! Heck, I hate to even sell, but I need to make hubby happy and this was the plan when I got the horse originally.

    All I read in this was "I think" and "I this". The thing is, it doesn't matter what you think. When you are shopping, you can do that. But here you are selling. It's pretty common to hand the horse off to the owner or staff to take care of it after the ride. Prospective buyers are often on a schedule, especially if they have their trainers with them as they are paying for the time and may have more horses to see that day.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2000
    Posts
    8,844

    Default

    I'll add my rant - what is it with SELLERS who don't tell you the horse is lame before you drive an hour to see it - when the horse is considerably smaller than advertised - when the seller does not even SHOW UP at a scheduled appointment - when they cannot locate their own brushes or hoof pick or wander off around the farm while you are trying to ride and get info about their horse?

    Horse shopping is an absolute nightmare and I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
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    Northern California
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    Default

    The 'I think' and 'I that' are being used because I'm expressing 'my' opinion. I'm not a big barn that sells 30 head a year at big ticket prices. If I was spending big money I would expect to have the whole nine yards- and please don't get me wrong I, of course am going to catch my horse and groom/tack it for you. I also expect to ride it for you. But if you take the reins, so to speak, on doing these things I would expect to to show respect to the horse and owner and not just dump the sweaty precious angel, that just packed you and your trainer around , off soon as the fun was over, just my opinion. I recognize it's a buyers market but if I get two offers, I'm gonna be inclined to take the best pick.... Just saying, I guess i expect too much...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    Yeah, if you are really calling your horse a "precious angel" you may be expecting a tad bit much.

    When you are receiving multiple full-price offers for your horses, then you can be choosy. But I would be as careful of judging potential buyers as one ought to be of potential sellers. Both sides are fraught with WAAAY too much emotion way too much of the time. Far better for it to be a dispassionate business transaction, wherein getting blown up over the perceived failure to care for the poor sweaty angel just doesn't happen.
    Click here before you buy.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Location
    Virginia
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    3,447

    Default

    Well OP, I feel entirely opposite regarding the horse-trying scenario. When I'm selling, I still own the horse. And most of the time people come to MY property to try. I have the horse in and ready when the potential buyer shows up, I tack, I ride and then they ride. And when they're done riding I take the sweaty beast and care for him. In part because he's mine, but more so because I don't trust any random customer with my future paycheck! The liability is lower all around if I handle, cool and bathe the sweaty beast. If Customer A off the street is leading sweaty beast back to the barn and he spooks, trips or has some form of equine brain fart and Customer A gets hurt, that's no good for me. If the same happens and sweaty beast gets away from Customer A and gets injured, or worse, that's no good for me either. For as long as it's my horse, I'll take care of it. And I'm willing to bet that the average buyer has run into far more of "me" (I'll handle my own horse, TYVM) than "you" (you got it sweaty, you deal with it).
    "Absent a correct diagnosis, medicine is poison, surgery is trauma and alternative therapy is witchcraft" A. Kent Allen
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/tailsofglory



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
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    Northern California
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    Default

    Right, I get it. I'm just saying that he was a very good boy and if I get the option to be choosy I will. Full price offers aren't going to guarantee the horse if I have options. I was merly expressing my surprise that a buyer would seemingly care so little about general good riding practice. I understand by choosing to label the horse as an angel I was going to catch some flack, but what ever. yesterday he WAS an angel.... Today may be a different day!



  12. #12
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    Mar. 30, 2012
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    Default

    And I wasn't blown up, just surprised. Lol, text is very hard to translate into speech....



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
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    6,871

    Default

    I don't believe that a buyer not cooling out a horse means they wouldn't do it at home.

    Honestly I like to do the cooling out myself, it gives buyer and their trainer time to talk in private about the horse, which they need if they are considering buying it. I like to offer them the opportunity to talk for a few minutes alone and cooling out offers just such an opportunity without feeling awkward. Of course I would let them if they wanted, but a well-placed, "you can give him to me when you are done, I'd be happy to cool him out and give you two a few minutes to chat" is nice for both parties.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Default

    "Seemingly" is a very shaky foundation upon which to build a character analysis . . .
    Click here before you buy.



  15. #15
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    Northern California
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    Default

    I do like that response, fordtraktor. That would be a great way to approach the situation! Thanks! Very constructive! And 'seemingly' if you appear to be careless I can't help how you present yourself. Sorry. Again just my opinion



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 8, 2002
    Location
    Maryland
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    9,137

    Default

    I haven't been involved in lots of sales, in the big scheme of things, but have never expected a prospective buyer to cool the horse out when they're done. I've had a few offer because they liked the horse enough and want to spend some more time with him (and see how he is in the wash stall, etc), but I don't think it's standard at all for buyers to have to do that.
    "smile a lot can let us ride happy,it is good thing"

    My CANTER blog.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
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    2,084

    Default

    As a seller- Sure you can cool the horse out, the more time you spend with the horse the more likely he/she is going to stand out in a sea of candidates. If I can encourage the bonding have at it!
    As the buyer- If I really like your horse then let me. It really gives me a chance to see the horse when I am not being judged by the trainer for sloppy position or on edge as I see the seller silently praying their horse isn't going to exit stage right without me.
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
    Originally Posted by alicen:
    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Default

    I read it that the OP thinks because the rider and trainer did not take the time to cool out the horse they must not bother at home either. Which is a huge leap to make.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
    Location
    Northern California
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    Default

    See! It's just been so long since I've sold a horse I guess I did not clearly understand the protocol! I absolute take the horse from The rider when they finish, and since it is my horse, the aftercare like hosing or grooming is my PLEASURE! I was just surprised is all



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Default

    I do not think there is a protocol. I think that is where you are getting confused.

    If everything about this trainer and this rider seem fine I would not jump to thinking they are neglectful. They might be used to a fuller care situation, they might have been on a time schedule (like others have said), they might assume (obviously wrongly in your case) that the owner prefers to take care of their own horse, etc.



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