The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 34
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2007
    Location
    Upper and Lower Canada
    Posts
    2,947

    Default Running unrealistic for an overweight 50 something?

    I am 57 and lost 50 pounds over the last year or so but am still 10 or 15 pounds overweight. Since I walk two miles everyday, rain or shine, in a beautiful forested area, I wanted to add a little jogging to the mix. I was thinking I could do a jog/walk a couple times a week, adding the jogging in gradually.

    The first couple of times went fine--I alternated a little jogging with the walking---but after the third, when I probably ended up jogging about a mile in total, still alternating it with bouts of walking, my knees were shot for two weeks. So I nixed the jogging and finally my knees are OK again.

    I'm using my trail walking shoes. Before I started the jogging, my knees didn't really give me any problems.

    Is this idea just unrealistic for an overweight late 50s person? I don't want to wreck my knees so that I can't walk at all or ride my horses. But I have to say that I did enjoy the jogging.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2009
    Posts
    937

    Default

    How new are your shoes? I'm in my 20s, but when I first started running my knees were giving me a lot of problems also. I went to a running store and they analyzed my feet/legs and my style of running and fit me with a pair of shoes that have alleviated a lot of my pain. I've also found that my knees do much better when I'm running on flat ground vs hills, you might try running on a track or the side of a flat road once or twice to see if you're knees are happier on that kind of surface

    Good luck!
    Cascadia- OTTB mare. 04/04-05/10
    If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,529

    Default

    Not unrealistic at all. I think a couple of things probably contributed to your knee pain: the wrong shoes and trying to do too much running too soon. Your walking shoes are probably perfectly fine for walking, but having the right shoes for running is very important, if you can, get to a running store (NOT a Sports Authority or similar) and get some help in finding the right shoe for you. A good running store will watch you run in them to help determine what shoe is right for you.

    For training, check out the "Couch-to-5k" plan. It is a good way to ease yourself into running. They even have a smartphone app.
    -Debbie / NH

    My Blog: http://deborahsulli.blogspot.com/



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
    Posts
    12,084

    Default

    Hiking would be better for you than running. Lots of people in your shoes take up hiking and it works perfectly for them.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 8, 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    936

    Default If you enjoy jogging

    ... consider working with a trainer, who can assess your form and your shoes. Definitely make sure your shoes are right for your kind of stride.

    I'm 50-something and jog 5K daily before work. The knees are still functional, though when my hip starts to go, I know it's time to replace the shoes.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2007
    Location
    Upper and Lower Canada
    Posts
    2,947

    Default

    Lex, the idea behind running was that I could use it to boost my regular walking workouts without much hassle since I'm already walking in a beautiful area everyday and have been doing this for the last 15 years. (Hiking would require driving somewhere else and my time is already taken up with my horses.)

    I suppose I should try cross-country skiing or snowshoeing in winter as they would be relatively easy to do and good exercise.

    Shoes are a couple of years old and generic trail walking shoes. (First time, I actually did the workout in my Bogs shoes which was a terrible idea).

    The paths are fairly flat but a little uneven (dirt with some gravel in places; I try to run on the places where it is soft dirt).

    I probably did push it a little since I wasn't breathing heavily or anything.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,851

    Default

    Vesper...walking briskly is a much better exercise than jogging. (less joint wear)

    If the routine you have works well for you, then add weights instead of increasing speed. Either hand and/or ankle weights or a well balanced backpack weight. (they sell them with removable weights, they're actually front and back packs combined)

    If your knees hurt for that long after jogging, I'd nix it for now for safety's sake. Many people can transition. Some can't. And once you trash your knees they're not often returned to 100% normal again. Wait until after your next normally scheduled Dr appointment and then bring it up with him/her. They know *you* and your body better than we do.

    And way to go on the weight loss!!
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2006
    Posts
    2,284

    Default

    I also recommend having someone look at your feet, to make sure you have the right kind of footwear. The Couch to 5K plan is BRILLIANT, basically the same thing that many distance coaches recommend to their newbie runners.

    I would also suggest considering joint supplements if you don't take them already. I'm in my 30s and have been running for less than a year, and I have dodgy knees. (One has a torn ACL, the other just aches sometimes.) If I go too many days without my glucosamine/chondroitin, they act up. As long as I keep myself in good shoes (replacing as needed, I get achey after about 4 months), keep my pace moderate (I do a lot of slow jogging/walking intervals), and stay on my supplements, I have no problems.

    Good luck to you!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2011
    Posts
    472

    Default Thoughts from a young (20s) runner...

    Definitely get a good/new pair of shoes. Knee pain is usually the way I figure out that my shoes are too worn out/not quite right for running.

    Also, the Couch to 5k plan was great. A friend of mine (in her late 40s) who had previously suffered from knee pain found that good running shoes + the gradual increase in running time in that program worked really well for her.

    I take a glucosamine supplement daily (with Dr. permission), when I'm going through times of high weekly running mileage and find that it seems to help my joints.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2008
    Posts
    1,484

    Default

    I jog and hike five days a week. Since I hike and need traction, I run/hike in trail running shoes. My favorites are Saucony. I also use a cross-trainer insert, and have no problems at all.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,969

    Default

    How many years have you been riding?

    After 50+ years riding, my knees are shot. I can walk all day long, but running is out of the question. I can't even jog to the car to get out of the rain without suffering shooting pains on both sides of my left knee. Bummer...
    Fan of the Swedish Chef



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2007
    Location
    Upper and Lower Canada
    Posts
    2,947

    Default

    I've been riding for seven years, so not long compared to most people here. I have back problems, which seem to be exacerbated by two point, but riding hasn't affected my knees yet.

    Thanks for the great information, folks!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2011
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    69

    Default

    Another young runner (wow it feels good to say that!) and I can't say enough good things about Couch to 5K! Even though I didn't start exactly at "couch", it was a really good way to transition, and I especially love how structured it is. Before, when I used to run, I would just go until I physically couldn't run anymore (usually it's my lungs that give up first) and then I wouldn't recover well and was miserable and falsely believed that I hated running. But now I find that I really enjoy the self-discipline and I think it has actually helped my riding somehow.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    6,692

    Default

    Well, I ran so much in high school and college for the various sports I was involved in that I haven't done so since then, and haven't missed it, it DOES wreck the knees.

    I do walk and hike as much as possible but not daily (other than walking the dogs most days but that doesn't count), and mostly I try to do at least 5 miles on my exercise bike. I also take little breaks at work and walk up and down the 7 floors of stairs. Not enough, given that I work full time and ride the horses most days, but every little bit helps. That, and eating and drinking less.

    As for riding and knees, stirrups are your friends- English, the four way flex ones and western, oxbows work superbly well for me. No more back or knee or hip pain out hunting or on an all day trail ride.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2009
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    1,027

    Default

    Well, I can't speak to the over 50 part, but can speak to the overweight part. I am in my mid 30s and am about 40 pounds from where I'd like to be weight-wise. I did the Couch to 5k program a few years and am still running a few times a week. I like to joke that I'm the fittest overweight person at my gym. I'm capable of doing much more than a lot of the fitter looking people and quite a few of them have commented on it to me. Oh, and yeah, sometimes I do look over to see at what speed they are running and for how long . So, yes, you can do this with your doctor's approval; don't let your not being at the "perfect" weight hold you back.

    I would also recommend making sure that you have proper footwear. I can tell when I need to replace my shoes when my knee starts to hurt.

    I can't say enough good about the C25K program! In all my life, even at my thinnest, I could not run. Like NoReins, I would run basically until my lungs hurt and I couldn't breathe, so of course, I "hated" it. The C25K program trains you and your body in increments that make it so much easier to become a runner. I also very much enjoyed the structure, or rather, having a program to follow to get me to my end goal; much better than whatever haphazard approach I would have come up with!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    10,443

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    Vesper...walking briskly is a much better exercise than jogging. (less joint wear)

    If the routine you have works well for you, then add weights instead of increasing speed. Either hand and/or ankle weights or a well balanced backpack weight. (they sell them with removable weights, they're actually front and back packs combined)

    If your knees hurt for that long after jogging, I'd nix it for now for safety's sake. Many people can transition. Some can't. And once you trash your knees they're not often returned to 100% normal again. Wait until after your next normally scheduled Dr appointment and then bring it up with him/her. They know *you* and your body better than we do.

    And way to go on the weight loss!!
    This.

    You're not 20 anymore and your joints already have a lot of "mileage" on them. The impact/compression from jogging can be a real issue.

    One thing to consider adding is swimming or other water-based exercise. It is excellent for cardiovascular conditioning and you don't have the risk of "impact" injury.

    Good luck and keep moving forward!!

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    4,343

    Default

    Why do you want to run? Seriously, it is unlikely to help you lose the last 10-15 lbs. If you just enjoy it, go get fitted for proper shoes, and start a couch to 5K program.

    I did a marathon trying to lose weight and not a pound lost. Changing my diet and switching to walking and weight training - I have lost 3 dress sizes in 6 months.

    I have nothing against jogging- but it is no silver bullet to weightloss and to get fit and be healthy you also need some weight training. And the key to jogging comfort is the right shoes.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    15,848

    Default

    I'm saying if you want to run, run. You are young yet.

    Bu take it very slowly. If you ride you know about interval training. It takes time to condition. There are lots of programs that get you ready for races, and they can be a start, but NOT to be followed so rigourously you hurt yourself.

    Run on perfect footing.

    Get the best possible shoes for the job, probably with inserts custom made for you to align your knees. I have a torn meniscus and have to have them, and so far have avoided surgery by not injuring it more.

    Running and inreasing your heart rate (slowly) can improve your core and help remove that little pot we seem to get at a certain age. Walking is great, too, but not the same. Power walking or Norwegian walking they say is probably almost as good as a run.

    Stay safe, and be smart, and careful, and increase gradually. It is not your age that limits you. And, if it is not for you personally, there are other options.

    You should be able to chat along the way, not gasp for air.


    Good luck and well done.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,529

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    I'm saying if you want to run, run. You are young yet.

    Bu take it very slowly. If you ride you know about interval training. It takes time to condition. There are lots of programs that get you ready for races, and they can be a start, but NOT to be followed so rigourously you hurt yourself.

    Run on perfect footing.

    Get the best possible shoes for the job, probably with inserts custom made for you to align your knees. I have a torn meniscus and have to have them, and so far have avoided surgery by not injuring it more.

    Running and inreasing your heart rate (slowly) can improve your core and help remove that little pot we seem to get at a certain age. Walking is great, too, but not the same. Power walking or Norwegian walking they say is probably almost as good as a run.

    Stay safe, and be smart, and careful, and increase gradually. It is not your age that limits you. And, if it is not for you personally, there are other options.

    You should be able to chat along the way, not gasp for air.


    Good luck and well done.
    Not sure if I agree with the run on perfect footing thing. I find that I am more likely to get those over-use injuries when I only run on smooth asphalt. When I have mixed it up with trail running, I am better able to keep those nagging injuries at bay. I think it's because running on less than perfect footing helps to strengthen all those supporting ligaments and tendons that you use when on uneven ground. When every foot strike is exactly the same as the one before, I am more likely to start developing some issues. I feel the same way for horses too, riding my horse on trails, in addition to the ring work, helps keep her sound, muscles developed and supporting ligaments and tendons strong. But that's just what I know has worked for me. Everyone has to find what is right for themselves (of course).
    -Debbie / NH

    My Blog: http://deborahsulli.blogspot.com/



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
    Posts
    7,806

    Default

    Adding running to your walk is an awesome idea. Running does NOT damage your joints if you do it correctly. I would, however, suggest avoiding running on hard pavement, because that might damage your joints.

    I would suggest you consider trying out the "Barefoot" type shoes. I personally experience knee pain after running if I run in well-fitting "Conventional" shoes (either self-selected or professionally selected) but have zero pain if I either run barefoot or in barefoot-type shoes, and I am not the only person who reports experiencing this. If allowed to move as it is designed to move the foot is a marvelous structure that absorbs shock rather than sending it up the leg to the knees; trap the foot in a cushioned, "supportive" shoe instead and it can't do that. http://gettingstronger.org/2010/03/t...efoot-running/
    for some info about studies about how your foot works to absorb shock, and how cushioned supportive shoes cause increased concussion.

    Start out slow- perhaps try jogging the first and last thirty seconds of your walk, and gradually increase from there.

    If you don't want to try the "barefoot" shoes, I urge you to NOT get professionally fitted for running shoes. I have some studies somewhere showing that people who get "Fitted" for shoes suffer from more pain and injuries than people who pick their own shoes out based on comfort, probably because the professional fitters try to "correct" the way people naturally move and force them to all move a particular way. Pick your own shoes- try on several pairs and run in them. Most stores will let you run around the store in your shoes to see which ones feel more comfy TO YOU>
    See below for a blurb on this topic:


    •A review by Warburton in the Australian journal Sportscience, of foot injuries, which found that “Wearers of expensive running shoes that were promoted as correcting pronation or providing more cushioning experienced a greater prevalence of these running-related injuries than wearers of less expensive shoes (Robbins and Gouw, 1991). In another study, expensive athletic shoes accounted for more than twice as many injuries as cheaper shoes, a fact that prompted Robbins and Waked (1997) to suggest that deceptive advertising of athletic footwear (e.g., “cushioning impact”) may represent a public health hazard. Anthony (1987) reported that running shoes should be considered protective devices (from dangerous or painful objects) rather than corrective devices, as their capacity for shock absorption and control of over-pronation is limited. The modern running shoe and footwear generally reduce sensory feedback, apparently without diminishing injury-inducing impact



Similar Threads

  1. Unrealistic expectations?
    By Bluey in forum Off Course
    Replies: 137
    Last Post: Jan. 17, 2013, 07:23 AM
  2. Replies: 16
    Last Post: Jul. 27, 2012, 10:22 PM
  3. Unrealistic Expectations (C-list, of course!)
    By GoForAGallop in forum Off Course
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Apr. 29, 2011, 12:23 PM
  4. Unrealistic pony shoppers?
    By Indyana in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 67
    Last Post: Sep. 20, 2010, 11:01 AM
  5. Eventing and 3rd/4th year med school...unrealistic?
    By Making It Work in forum Eventing
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Oct. 30, 2009, 01:44 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness