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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
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    348

    Default The very perfectly pulled mane

    Ok. I must need help pulling manes because a few weeks after I do, my horses' manes stand straight up. I know this is because I am pulling the hairs underneath and its pushing the rest of the mane upwards once those pulled hairs become an inch long or so. I try to pull evenly throughout the mane but I keep having this problem. Plus, it seems like my manes are becoming more coarse over time too. Does anyone have any hints? These are horses that show and need to be braided so cutting manes is out. Their manes are relatively thick...too thick to be left un-pulled. Thanks for your help.



  2. #2
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    May. 17, 2000
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    some horses manes stand up, some do not, as long as you are pulling it the right length for braiding, that's really what matters... I used to comb out stand up manes when they were rinsed - that helps, as does a wet towel over the neck, but mostly what helps is for the mane to get long and heavy enough to tip over...andthenyoupullitagain
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
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    Snohomish, WA
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    447

    Default

    My guy has a total mommy do. Fortunately we haven't even shown yet. Can't wait to see what people say.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2012
    Location
    East Coast
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    383

    Default

    Are you sure you're pulling all the hairs out from the root? Usually manes stand up after pulling because the hairs broke. You should see the roots on the end of the hairs.

    If you're definitely getting the root with the hair, I would suggest that you keep pulling, but do it a little every few days. If you do one big effort every few weeks, you are going to get a lot of short hair coming in at the same time. If you just do a few minutes every few days, the incoming hair will be a various lengths and locations along the mane, and should't make the mane stand up. The nicest, flattest manes come after months of gradual pulling.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
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    348

    Default

    Ahhh. Excellent advice TR. thank you. I think you're right. I do pull all at once. I do try to get it all out by the root which usually happens but I admit that sometimes the hair breaks. How can I prevent that? My pulling comb breaks the hair. I've tried all different kinds of pulling combs.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    970

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by About Time View Post
    Ahhh. Excellent advice TR. thank you. I think you're right. I do pull all at once. I do try to get it all out by the root which usually happens but I admit that sometimes the hair breaks. How can I prevent that? My pulling comb breaks the hair. I've tried all different kinds of pulling combs.
    Decrease the amount of hair you're pulling at a time, less strands. Takes longer, but patience is a virtue in this case.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2010
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    recent transplant to the Peper
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    530

    Default

    My horse's mane also tends to stand straight up or flip over to the wrong side...as a result he pretty much lives in training braids. I pull his mane once a week or so to keep on top of it and put it back in braids..



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
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    4,426

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by About Time View Post
    Ahhh. Excellent advice TR. thank you. I think you're right. I do pull all at once. I do try to get it all out by the root which usually happens but I admit that sometimes the hair breaks. How can I prevent that? My pulling comb breaks the hair. I've tried all different kinds of pulling combs.
    My mare's mane broke with a comb every time I tried pulling it. And if it didn't break, it looked ragged, sort of like when you curl a ribbon to wrap a present with a pair of scissors!

    Now I pull it with just my fingers, a tiny bit a a time. We have a long way to go, but I don't have damaged hairs from the comb. They are either there, or not.

    Good luck!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,732

    Default

    If they are always shown braided, why do you care what it looks like the rest of the time? My guy has a mohawk or it flips to the wrong side, but as long as it's braidable, why fixate on what it does at home?
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2000
    Location
    Goochland, VA
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    Default

    Use the comb to push the hair back, but actually pull it out with only your fingers. It won't break that way. If the hair starts to cut your fingers, put a latex surgical glove on that hand. Works like a charm and I pull a LOT of manes.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



  11. #11
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    May. 17, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by lauriep View Post
    Use the comb to push the hair back, but actually pull it out with only your fingers. It won't break that way. If the hair starts to cut your fingers, put a latex surgical glove on that hand. Works like a charm and I pull a LOT of manes.
    lol, but I must confess - regular pulling, and pulling this way? There was about a 2cm line between optimal braiding length and a mohawk when it came to Robbie! I finally settled on option C - get really good at tying up whispies so he could have a mane long enough to lay down.
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2010
    Posts
    476

    Default

    If you are like me and have a horse blessed with a thick mane and a wide crest, you will be forever battling with it to keep it laying over on the right side. If you want it to lay over, long and blunt is best. But that doesn't really work for braiding (at least it does not work for me)! When it is braiding length, it is very hard to keep it looking tidy. I have found that the hair on the left side of the crest is longer than the hair on the right, even though it is even when laying on the right side. I have tried every trick in the book and aside from living in training braids (which only works for a day or two), I have given up and allow the mane to stick up and/or lay on the left .

    To help with the coarseness, I wash and condition his mane. I just don't condition before I braid it.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    348

    Default

    Great suggestions! Thanks all. I am going to condition their manes and also start to pull with my fingers which I've done in the past but it hurts. I think I just need to do as some suggested and pull smaller pieces and do it more frequently. I hate to do it to them... I feel so badly. So I usually try to get it over with as quickly as possible. I like their manes to look as nice as possible between shows because I take them other places such as clinics and such on occasion and I like them to look nice.



  14. #14
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    you can pull with a comb if it hurts your fingers - the key thing about pulling by hand is you are gently and you don't pull too much at once. And if you do, it hurts your hand so you stop doing that. But when my hand starts hurting with pulling by hand, I do as LP describes above, then once I have that small amount of hair, I use the comb for leverage (not by wrapping the hair around the comb, but just using the comb between the hair and my hand. Easy on the horse, easy on my hand. You just have to remember not to get "greedy"...
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



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