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View Poll Results: Which barn?

Voters
31. You may not vote on this poll
  • Barn B

    0 0%
  • Barn D

    30 96.77%
  • Neither, keep looking

    1 3.23%
  • Other (please post!)

    0 0%
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
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    Default Which boarding barn, round two! Barn B or Barn D?

    Ok COTH, this is my last poll, I promise!

    If you want to see the original thread, here it is.

    Barn B

    - 20 minutes from home, 5 or 10 minutes from work.
    - Decent pastures, not awesome but not mud lots.
    - Non-horsey BO, but is mentored by BO of barn next door, who is extremely knowledgeable.
    - Ok facilities (off-site indoor, roundpen, pastures to ride in, quiet roads to ride on, no barn or stalls, no tack room, no bathroom, no electricity except heated troughs)
    - Someone on the property most of the time, but not as often as Barn A.
    - Pasture board only in small herds BO chooses
    - $100/mo, very very reasonable

    Barn D

    - 10 minutes from home, 40 minutes from work
    - Dry lots, decent pastures, or lush pastures, you pick which your horse goes in.
    - Mother/daughter BO. Mother is not very horsey, daughter is. However, daughter is young, teenager. But seems flexible and more than happy to work with you.
    - Stunning facilities (perfect indoor on site, roundpen, quiet roads, acres of fields to ride in, very nice tack room, very nice bathroom, wash rack)
    - Someone on property vast majority of time, and surrounded by horsey neighbors.
    - Stall board only, but you can have your horse out or in as much as you want. Meaning in summer if you want them out 24/7, or night turnout, or day turnout, that's fine. But no shelters. BO provides turnout.
    - Beautiful, LARGE stalls (I'd say at least 10x14, maybe 12x14 or 12x16) with rubber mats and shavings, you can provide fans, they provide heated buckets.
    - Turnout in small herds that you can choose.
    - $300/mo, at the top of my budget

    ---

    What say you, COTH?
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
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    Earlysville, Virginia
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    Default

    I would say barn D without a doubt. If you can afford it.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
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    4,485

    Default

    If it were me, I would choose barn D because of the amenities it offers, particularly the indoor, multiple turnout options and tack room/bathroom. Since I also want to compete it would be important for me to be able to spend a lot of time at the barn which is why the bathroom is important. lol. Also the indoor so I can ride no matter what the weather is.

    Option B is a bit of a concern because it seems you have to hack out to do any serious riding. Plus there's no barn?? I hope (and assume) there are shelters in the pasture? The lack of choice in turnout bothers me a lot. What if the BO says your horse is ok with so-and-so group, but what if *you* see issues going on that you don't like? What then?

    If there is only $200 difference, can you take a part time job or do something on the side to help make up that amount? Or cut back in some other area of your life?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
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    Illinois, USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AliCat518 View Post
    I would say barn D without a doubt. If you can afford it.
    Would the fact that it's managed by a younger person turn you off at all? That's I guess my only concern. I would be out there daily anyways though.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SnicklefritzG View Post
    If it were me, I would choose barn D because of the amenities it offers, particularly the indoor, multiple turnout options and tack room/bathroom. Since I also want to compete it would be important for me to be able to spend a lot of time at the barn which is why the bathroom is important. lol. Also the indoor so I can ride no matter what the weather is.

    Option B is a bit of a concern because it seems you have to hack out to do any serious riding. Plus there's no barn?? I hope (and assume) there are shelters in the pasture? The lack of choice in turnout bothers me a lot. What if the BO says your horse is ok with so-and-so group, but what if *you* see issues going on that you don't like? What then?

    If there is only $200 difference, can you take a part time job or do something on the side to help make up that amount? Or cut back in some other area of your life?
    I should've specified; there are shelters, just no barn for stalls/tack/anything.

    The underlined is a very big concern. I'm leaving current barn because of this problem.

    I can swing the $200 difference, it just would mean I'd have less "fun money".
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
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    Default

    How important are riding facilities, and how often are you going to be using them?

    IOW, is that beautiful indoor *really* worth $200/month to you?



  7. #7
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    Sep. 26, 2010
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    If you can swing the $200 then go to barn B. Quality turnout is EXTREMELY important. I left one barn earlier this year because my horse was getting pushed around in turnout, chased away from her hay/grain and I had NO choice in who she was turned out with. She was not happy at that barn.

    At my current barn, I have some options between solo and turnout with a buddy. My horse is now turned out all night (~12hours) with one other horse with whom she gets along very well. This also makes her much more relaxes and able to focus on training.



  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    How important are riding facilities, and how often are you going to be using them?

    IOW, is that beautiful indoor *really* worth $200/month to you?
    The indoor? Not really. Being able to customize my horse's care (pick your pasture, have a stall if you want it, leave them out if you don't want it, etc)? Absolutely.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  9. #9
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sublimequine View Post
    The indoor? Not really. Being able to customize my horse's care (pick your pasture, have a stall if you want it, leave them out if you don't want it, etc)? Absolutely.
    If that's what's most important to you, then be sure to confirm that's what actually happens with other boarders.

    Because that sort of deal is the kind of thing you hear about when you visit the place, but (IME) often totally falls apart when you're actually THERE.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
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    2,224

    Default

    Agree re: talking to other boarders. I recently moved barns primarily due to a BO's description of turnout not exactly matching reality... I asked all the right questions, I just didn't ask the right people.

    As for an indoor, I used to think it was really important until I was forced to ride outside when we moved to a non-indoor barn. Turns out, Horse and I both prefer riding outside, even in maybe-not-so-nice weather; I didn't miss having the indoor NEARLY as much as I thought I would. So an indoor is no longer a factor for me-- it's a nice perk, but not one I'd pay any more $$ to have.
    *friend of bar.ka

    "Evidently, I am an unrepentant b*tch, possible trouble maker, and all around super villian"



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    If that's what's most important to you, then be sure to confirm that's what actually happens with other boarders.

    Because that sort of deal is the kind of thing you hear about when you visit the place, but (IME) often totally falls apart when you're actually THERE.
    There's actually no other boarders currently, they're taking in just a few horses to their private facility. But very good point, I'll speak with BO about it to confirm.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2007
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    North San Diego County, CA
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    Default

    Red Flag Alert --

    Many time private, gorgeous, residences are just not that amenable to boarders. They think they are, but soon enough they get annoyed and realize they weren't cut out to have others at their "house."

    I had a horse on trial with a woman who was annoyed that the horse pawed -- she fretted that he would ruin her stall footing, she constantly swept up while you led your horse to cross-ties (shaving footprints be gone!). Wanted you to pick your poop out of the arena before you rinsed off your horse. Shortened up the barn hours. Wanted you to vacuum the tack room when done.

    She had a nice place, but I felt like we were in her living room. She just didn't have it in her to accept the normal "wear/tear/people" of boarding horses.

    I've seen it happen a couple other times, too. One owner required that boarders call first if they wanted to come to the barn outside of normal hours (7-7pm). I can see her point, it's her ranch, but it wouldn't work for me.

    That said -- the second barn would be $1200/month out here, so I'd take it, lol!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    Default

    I also don't think I'd want to be the first boarder at a barn where it's all private and they are taking in boarders for the first time. WHY are they doing that? More than likely to make money. Which is perfectly fine and the only real rational reason to do so, of course. But if it's a private barn and the boarders are just there to help make ends meet, as opposed to a barn with a business plan and a "customers first" policy, (which is admittedly probably rare, LOL) then I'd worry about being looked on as a nuisance, especially if you are planning to ask for all sorts of special treatment. It's not that I mind BEING a nuisance if the situation really calls for it, but in general I try not to be THAT boarder unless I'm paying for special treatment. And no matter where you live, $300/month is not premium board money. I worry that the BO at barn D will figure that out pretty quickly.

    In order to justify TRIPLING my board bill, there would have to be some UNBELIEVABLE perks. What is it about barn D that justifies 3x the board, and with $200 a month in your pocket could you not work something out at barn B to fix whatever it is?
    Click here before you buy.



  14. #14
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sublimequine View Post
    There's actually no other boarders currently, they're taking in just a few horses to their private facility. But very good point, I'll speak with BO about it to confirm.
    Danger danger Will Robinson!

    These people have NO IDEA about what they're offering actually entails. Once they find out how much work it is, it's exceedingly likely that they'll start dropping services.

    At the very least, let someone ELSE be their guinea pig for 3 - 6 months, and if they're still offering the same deal then, THEN I would consider moving there.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Connecticut
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    Default

    Too many variables at play and not enough feedback from the OP.

    Have you made a list of exactly what you need and what you can be flexible on? If fixing the turnout issue is your only requirement right now, then you need to think more on this before moving because winter is coming. Once you really have narrowed it down, call your vet and run both places by him/her. They get into the barns and have a feel for what works and what to stay away from. Ditto your farrier. What looks great on the outside may have a real witch running it on the inside. If they start making cracks about the BM using a broom to commute to work, you have your answer.

    Random thoughts here:
    Any BO who won't retain final say on where the horses go on the property is nuts to allow boarders on the place.

    If the owner of barn B is willing to allow you to use an in-home bathroom, then that nixes that problem. If not and you still like the place, carry bathroom tissue in your trunk and use a stall. Problem solved. Although it's gonna get a bit nippy in the winter.

    How much do you really ride in the winter? Do you need the indoor? Big Bucks for indoors. Do you need a trainer? And how many of the amenities offered will you really use?

    Who's doing the majority of the work here, you or the barn? How much do you really want to do? Stalls and frozen buckets gets old 1/2 was through the winter. If self-care, are you hauling your own hay, or is it provided on-site, and if so, is it decent for what you need?

    Can you get along in a small family-owned facility? Are you just looking at someone to eyeball your horse once or twice a day, or are you looking for more? Do your horses need stalls? Make sure you and your mother can get along with BO and daughter BM, or you will be barn shopping before the end of the summer, as you will be the only distractions they have.

    And finally, can your budget handle a board increase? Because that's what I see coming at Barn D. They don't realize what they have. Around here, that would be going rate for self-care only. Prices will be going up across the board on everything over the winter. They always do. Full care in a place like that here would start around $550 and skyrocket upwards to $1200.

    We need more info about the OP, and not just thinking about what looks good in the poll.
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

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  16. #16
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    Default

    I voted for Barn D, but with the added info later in the thread, I'm not so sure.

    I too would worry about being the first boarder. The facilities may be gorgeous, but I'd worry that the people don't really know what it means to run a boarding barn, and they'll either resent you, or they'll expect you to do some of the work (with no decrease in the boarding price), or they'll start out doing everything right but then they'll stop paying attention or lose interest or get fed up with the chores and maintenance.

    Esp. given that D is at the top of your budget, I think I'd go with B for now anyway. Maybe check back in with D in 6 months time and see how it's going then.
    "The formula 'Two and two make five' is not without its attractions." --Dostoevsky



  17. #17
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    ^^Hmm....I'd say this.
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

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  18. #18
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    I'd say barn D...but I do agree that being the first boarder could be an issue. Possibly. Or possibly not. I think it really depends on the people. I will say that I have usually ended up spending MORE money when I board at cheaper places because they make mistakes that get my horse hurt, skimp on stuff that I then have to buy myself, etc. Plus, I end up feeling like I have to be out at the barn all the time to make sure my horse is okay.



  19. #19
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    If I were paying $100/month for board and can afford up to $300/month for board, I would earmark some of the money saved (after finishing saying my prayers of thanksgiving every morning!) for taking care of whatever deficiencies might be present at the $100 barn.

    I keep mine at home and they stay outside and I can't begin to afford to feed, hay, and bed them at $100/month!
    Click here before you buy.



  20. #20
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Deltawave, I think that works in principle, but not as well in practice. This is partially because some deficiencies (like competence) cannot be fixed with money. It also doesn't account for the value of your own time - I seriously had to spend so much time at one barn (because they were so incompetent and would NOT turn horses out) that it was impeding my ability to work.
    Last edited by FineAlready; Jun. 18, 2012 at 03:54 PM. Reason: principal vs. principle. Me smrt.



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