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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2010
    Posts
    152

    Default How do I keep a shoe on!

    I have a fairly new OTTB, four years old, medium/hot, short coupled and long legged who I cannot keep a shoe on. He has been unsound on the left front since he pulled the first one and I have had him on stall and small paddock rest for two weeks. He went out into the pasture today and ran around like a madman and pulled the shoe again (with bell boots and clips on) and is lame again. I don't know how to manage this problem. He needs turnout or else he is a lunatic. He also needs the pasture as he is underweight. I don't know how to protect him from himself. I hand walked him and had him in the small paddock before I turned him out to try and calm him down but to no avail. I can't ride him, can't protect him, can't keep him sound. Is this a horse destined for the stall and the run only? I tried him barefoot for quite a while and that didn't work either. Help!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2009
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    145

    Default

    Have you tried glue ons? Is his hoof wall weak, or does he just really trip over himself?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2010
    Posts
    152

    Default

    No, his hoof wall is not that weak. I think glue ons would be worse. He is overtracking and pulling the fronts off with his hind feet.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2011
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    210

    Default

    I have an OTTB (does have shitty feet) who is also short coupled with long legs. He lives outside 80% of the time and is in bell boots 24/7 except to do dressage at shows. His bell boots are replaced monthly as he rips chunks out when over reaches. Glue ons DO hold better, but a horse can't be glued all the time as that also damages their feet. My horse's shoeing cycle goes like this; November-January barefoot during his break. February barefoot during first month of legging up of the year. March - May nailed up with shoes on all four, June - September glued up front, nailed behind. October nailed up all four, Etc.

    My advice is if you have ruled out an abcess or bruise and he is newly off the track, keep him barefoot and bute him until his feet toughen up. He needs his turnout. Once he relaxes and realizes this is the new norm for him, then put shoes on if he needs them.

    Some people might reccomend to square up his hind feet. Don't do this. Horses hinds are meant to be pointy as this is what they push off with. Before going to glue ons, try Hot Shoeing with clips that the farrier "makes" himself, not a premade shoe with clips already there. Look for a Certified Journeyman Farrier in your area through the AFA. Good Luck!
    Things happen for a reason...so when I reach over and smack you upside the head, just remember...you gave me a reason!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,368

    Default

    I think it depends on why he's pulling the shoe. I would try to determine whether it's a conformation issue, a development/muscling issue, a "lunatic on turnout" issue, etc.

    I can offer up this....my 4yo WB gelding went through a growth spurt and after happily living in front shoes for a year, pulled a shoe SIX TIMES in one shoeing cycle (he alternated between his LF and RF, though he pulled the RF 4x versus the 2 pulled LFs). We put hind shoes on him and added fairly substantial trailers to help slow down his hind end a bit. It made a world of difference and also helped his movement in general (by essentially matching his front and hind end). We'll start working away from the trailers now that he's muscled up and come out of the slightly awkward growth phase.

    With that being said, I don't think a pulled shoe or two is enough to make any big changes....especially if the pulling is happening while the horse is wheeling around. If I knew the horse was slightly sore b/c of a missing shoe I would wrap the foot really well (some sort of a pad, vet wrap, gorilla tape) and then let the horse stay out.....if that was going to be the difference between calm and nutty.

    Good luck!
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2006
    Location
    Port Perry Ontario - formerly Prodomus
    Posts
    2,364

    Default

    I have a huge swedish wb cross that keeps pulling his right front shoe - wrecking his hoof.

    Two options i see - have your farrier take off all the heel of the shoe or put one size smaller on - so there is nothing that can be stepped on from the back.

    Keeping fingers crossed - so far - even with crazy running around he has kept the shoe on for two weeks.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 14, 2008
    Posts
    285

    Default

    I will second Bravestorm. It really is not the best option, but in the end, it was our only option. Sometimes you have to do what you have to do.

    I have been through 5 farriers before I found one that could keep them on ( Tried hot shoes, trailers, squaring the hinds) there was one point where he was done 3 times in one week!

    He is in a size smaller than what he should be and has been for several years and it has not caused any problems.

    Good Luck !!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2010
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    343

    Default

    Is he long in the toe? Maybe square it up a little bit, as well as hinds. The smaller shoe might cause more bad than good in the long run



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,667

    Default

    I'd talk to your farrier. It sounds like maybe the *front* toes are too long - see what he thinks about bringing the breakover back a bit to get those front feet out of the way a bit quicker.

    JMHO.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2011
    Location
    Upatoi, GA
    Posts
    622

    Default

    Make sure his breakover in front is correct. Usually horses that keep pulling the front shoes off just can't get the front feet out of the way fast enough. JMHO & good luck!
    Founder & President, Dapplebay, Inc.
    Creative Director, Equestrian Culture Magazine
    Take us to print!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
    Posts
    9,625

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Langfuhr View Post
    Is he long in the toe? Maybe square it up a little bit, as well as hinds. The smaller shoe might cause more bad than good in the long run
    Agreed. I would look to this before putting a smaller (or shorter) shoe on him. I have a large STB who would make a game of pulling off his front shoes. For a while, I had a farrier who put him in smaller/shorter shoes so there wasn't as much metal behind. Now that I have moved OOS, I have a fabulous farrier who instead squared off the toe to change the break over. Now, he's got plenty of support, is wearing the correct size shoe, and hasn't pulled a shoe in a year and a half. Now, with the way he is trimmed now, he can get those front feet off the ground faster and out of the way of those pesky hind feet.

    I'll say that he had no issues with the smaller/shorter shoes he wore for a few years, but I am more comfortable with the way he is shod now. If this didn't work, I would probably go back to trying what we did before... but (knock wood) this is working great.

    Good luck. I completely understand how frustrating this can be!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    12,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fibbermaggee View Post
    I have a fairly new OTTB, four years old, medium/hot, short coupled and long legged who I cannot keep a shoe on. He has been unsound on the left front since he pulled the first one and I have had him on stall and small paddock rest for two weeks. He went out into the pasture today and ran around like a madman and pulled the shoe again (with bell boots and clips on) and is lame again. I don't know how to manage this problem. He needs turnout or else he is a lunatic. He also needs the pasture as he is underweight. I don't know how to protect him from himself. I hand walked him and had him in the small paddock before I turned him out to try and calm him down but to no avail. I can't ride him, can't protect him, can't keep him sound. Is this a horse destined for the stall and the run only? I tried him barefoot for quite a while and that didn't work either. Help!

    Honestly...if he was locked up. Hand walking and a small paddock would had done NOTHING to keep my horses from being idiots and pullshoes. I would have worked him hard before turn out or drugged him.

    I have a couple of horses who pull shoes on a regular basis. They live in bell boots and I do what I can to keep them calmer in turnout.....and more turn out the better. Good luck!!
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,332

    Default

    I had the same problem and tackled it successfully with the following:

    1. A new shoer. He moved the breakover on the fronts back so the fronts got out of the way faster. He also set the shoes tight in the heels and beveled the edges of the shoe's heels so he couldn't step them off, and dubbed the toe on the hinds.

    2. Overreach boots: getting the right kind was crucial. Davis vinyl ones that are nice and long and touch the ground a good bit at the heel area worked for me.

    3. Due to this setup it was important for my horse to have a couple months off with no shoes every winter, let the nail holes grow out and the heels expand a bit (those tight set heels aren't great long term...)
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2011
    Location
    Upatoi, GA
    Posts
    622

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    I'd talk to your farrier. It sounds like maybe the *front* toes are too long - see what he thinks about bringing the breakover back a bit to get those front feet out of the way a bit quicker.

    JMHO.
    Haha! We posted almost the exact same reply at the same time
    Founder & President, Dapplebay, Inc.
    Creative Director, Equestrian Culture Magazine
    Take us to print!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2004
    Posts
    358

    Default

    I just ordered and received from England a product called ShoeSecure. They were not cheap and shipping was high, but I am hoping they help. They go on tonight! www.shoesecure.com

    They screw into the stud holes and cover the back of the shoe. I have very steep hills and lots of mud, so my horses love to pull their shoes.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    I agree to get the right type of bell boots. I don't recommend trailering a horses hind shoes if they are not use to it. It will change the way they stand and can mess up their ligaments and make them sore. I had a mare crippled from them and we couldn't figure out why until we took the shoes off. I know it's frustrating and I had to find a different farrier.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2012
    Posts
    1,961

    Default

    My old guy did this, and had wax-paper soles besides! What finally worked for us was to dub and roll his front toes right down to the blood, then have your hot-shoer pull him some trailers behind to slow down his hinds. My guy had a huge overtrack which was why he was always pulling 'em.

    With trailers on, he'd better be single T/O, however--those things are downright lethal if he kicked someone.

    You might also try MORE T/O so he has less pent-up energy.

    Good Luck!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2008
    Location
    Greeley, Colorado
    Posts
    3,769

    Default

    Have you tried these? They probably wouldn't be great long term but maybe they'll work long enough to get him sound. I used them on a chronic shoe puller and they were amazing.

    http://www.doversaddlery.com/italian...ot/p/X1-04254/
    **Friend of bar.ka**

    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
    My equine soulmate



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