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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,429

    Red face My mare turned into a hormonally insane man crazy hussy.

    My mare just turned 4. She has obviously had heat cycles regularly now. Nothing out of the ordinary but a little b@:tchy each month. I have her on SmartHarmony and now that she's been on it I can't even tell! Love that stuff!

    WELL...we now know it works. She ran out while away at the trainers for 10 days. I picked her up after 6 weeks of training on the 10th day she was off it and brought her to the stable I board at. They have 2 stallions on property. She seemed fine. But 3 days later we headed off to a show and a few nights at a friend's barn. We got home one week ago and my sweet, obedient angel has gone completely nuts!! She is squatting and winking if the wind so much as blows. Can't pay attention and is now locked in a stall 24/7 because she is crashing through pasture after pasture to get in by the geldings! She goes from one to the next, taking a shock each time without a flinch! Yes, we tested the fence. It works. Ugh. We tried putting her with a gelding. No luck. She tired of him after 5 minutes and broke in to be with the Percheron gelding...then as we went to retrieve her she galloped off, hopped through more fencing and went visiting the TB gelding. Needless to say she is now locked up tight and we are all in awe of this insanity. Every gelding and stallion on property is absolutely nuts at the sight, smell or sound of her. I'm ready to kill her! I can't believe my sweet little girl is the new stable tramp! LOL

    Anyway to stop this heat cycle faster? I hate that she can't be outside! Can I double her SmartHarmony? Any other brilliant ideas? I'll tell you what...we will never let that supplement lapse again! Yikes!
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2009
    Location
    Dairyville USA
    Posts
    2,979

    Default

    Do you plan on breeding her? If not, I would have a talk with your DVM about implants, regumate, marbles (I've never had luck with marblesbut if it's not going to harm...), etc.

    ETA: to clarify I've not had luck with marbles but have had luck with the other alternatives.
    Last edited by Grataan; May. 31, 2012 at 01:04 PM.
    Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
    Sam: A job? Does it pay?
    Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
    Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,429

    Default

    I'm not planning on breeding her. The SmartMare seemed to work beautifully so I'm hoping once she's back on it regularly this will just be an isolated incident. I'm just hoping it ends sooner than later so we can let her back out again! If this occurs again she'll be getting something like that done FOR SURE because this is just insane. I'm sure it's the combo off being off SmartMare and returning to a barn with stallions at breeding time that's put her over the edge. She's just a little barn tramp right now! Oy!
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2009
    Location
    Dairyville USA
    Posts
    2,979

    Default

    I totally sympathize. I have two mares who are, um, extremely amorous. It's a good thing one of them is at the out of state trainer because she is Treasure's favorite color (bay with chrome) mare and he just LOOOOOVES her. Like a lovesick puppy. I tried telling him that the two of them are just using him but he doesn't understand.

    Welcome to the "owners of mares who are raging 'hos" clique

    ETA: You can also try just plain raspberry leaves (you can get them over the web from places like

    http://www.abesmarket.com/

    http://www.amazon.com/Red-Rasberry-L.../dp/B00016XJTM

    http://www.mountainroseherbs.com

    There's one or two other websites that COTHers have posted having good luck with getting the leaves (and other herbs) at a much cheaper rate than MM and having good quality etc. I've had clients use both Abe's Market and the Mtn. Rose people with good luck.
    Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
    Sam: A job? Does it pay?
    Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
    Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2009
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    2,089

    Default

    I've had amazing results with a marble, but it needs to be inserted by someone with lots of experience and a history of good results. I use the vet school for this one thing. It was about $125.00.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,429

    Default

    Thank you for the formal welcome to the "owner's of horses who are raging hos" group! LOLOL I'm really hoping this is an isolated experience but if not I'm glad to hear the marbling worked! That was what I'm most interested in. Her barn owner (a breeder) is in awe of the strength. She even has a swollen vulva which BO says is super rare in never been bred mares.

    We found the fence was shocking low (2000 volts) so we fixed it and tried to put her out again. No luck. Right under and through she went. I'm worried she's going to learn to be a fence buster through this so I hooked up a dog shock collar to her halter, led her out and zapped her when she started under. She jumped back hard and I caught her and we've got her back in a stall again. I'm glad she didn't end on a "fencing is fun to run through!" note and hopefully she'll remember that shock.

    We were able to successfully keep her in the stallion paddock with is 4 strand at 7000 volts. We're building her a "Ho Mare" pasture the same way over the weekend. Fingers crossed this ends quickly and my mare returns soon!!
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    920

    Default

    If she has studish behavior also have a vet check her for ovarian cyst. I knew a mare who had one and is became a raging "stallion" with heat cycles. They operate and remove cyst and this mare is back to normal.
    Adriane
    Happily retired but used to be:
    www.ParrotNutz.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
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    Default

    Thank goodness she's all girl! She's not displaying any studdy behavior...just mare all the way! Phew! LOL
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2008
    Posts
    609

    Default

    Ive been giving my mare injectable ReguMate ...1.5 cc's IM every 10-12 days which has kept her out of raging heat and Omega Alpha's Pre Mare and Mare Magic seem to help a lot



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    When my mare turned 3.5-4 years old she started the same hussy type behavior.

    She seemed constantly in heat. She was VERY opinionated about which geldings she liked and disliked. She seemed ok with mares. But I didn't have one to pasture her with. But she was more safe to ride on trails with mares only, but did squeal, and she did get in trouble for that. The geldings she disliked it was very dangerous to ride her on trails with geldings. In the pasture with a gelding she disliked, omg, both barrels she would give them, repeatedly.

    I figured it out. Now she is calm and quiet. If I breed her, I will HAVE TO ultrasound her to see if she is in heat. Seriously.

    What did I figure out?

    Soy.

    Soy is estrogen. And she can not handle it when on it. As she got older, the worse the symptoms became.

    She is on zero drugs, never was. Remove ALL soy, and with in a month she was normal. She went from a horse I thought I would never be able to ride with or around other horses, nor ever put her in a pasture with any other horse, not even across the fence. She messed up alot of my fencing by kicking, and striking. Now, I never see this behavior. She will never squeal or show any reaction to another horse these days. Whew, what a relief.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Location
    Alberta's bread basket
    Posts
    1,686

    Default

    Soy is a big problem and it's loaded in a LOT of extruded feeds. Most of them, in fact. They use it because it is cheap, cheap, cheap. It's extremely difficult to find a feed without soy.

    So, for the most part, I keep my mares off all extruded feeds while I'm trying to get them bred. If there is a mare that needs extra feed on top of pasture grass and mixed hay, I will use some oats and/or barley flakes mixed with a bit of beet pulp.
    Last edited by rodawn; Jun. 2, 2012 at 12:30 PM.
    https://www.facebook.com/MariposaSportHorses

    Practice! Patience! Persistence!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,392

    Default

    Agree with removing the soy ... I've seen issues with high soy diets as well. But - this mare also needs to be palpated by a repro vet to make sure she doesn't have an abnormality that may need attention. The vet can give her drugs to regulate her cycle and then you can try returning to your supplements; they likely won't function when her estrogen is so high.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
    Posts
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    Default

    Oh crap! I wonder if that's what did it! About 8 weeks ago I started her on Progressive ProAdvantage. She was previously on hay and a multi-vitamin but we wanted more protein and amino acids. I just looked and soybean meal is the first ingredient! Aside from a little minor moodiness she's never been a problem before. I figured it was returning to the stallion filled farm in breeding season that triggered this but perhaps it's the new soy she's on! If it happens again next month I'll pull her off and find something else! Amy suggestions for a growing 4 year old?
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2004
    Location
    E. Washington
    Posts
    823

    Default

    I am actually planning on calling my vet about either marbles or the implants. The implants worked great for my friends mare when she was younger.

    My mare just went into her first overt heat cycle this weekend and the day before she was uber cranky. In heat she was a little better, but this mare is fantastic when not in season.

    Grataan - Any information on implants would be greatly appreciated. I mentioned spaying to several people and got the "she's gorgeous, why would you spay her! Don't you want to breed her?" Nope. Did the baby thing, but she is breeding quality. I don't plan on selling her, but spaying could be good or bad for resale.

    Thanks.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2009
    Location
    Dairyville USA
    Posts
    2,979

    Default

    It's off label, but basically one does an oral ReguMate trial and if that works, you (well, your DVM) implant hormone pellets designed for use in cattle. While they don't fully suppress the ovarian cycle some people find that they help the behaviors associated with coming into season (I've had good luck with them but they don't work with every mare)

    IME they work best when done at the beginning of the spring/end of winter before the horses start into their transitional heats.

    However, they're cheap and easy to try (much easier and cheaper than daily ReguMate) if they work great if they don't then not much is lost.

    I like to put them in the neck, just below the crest where they're under the mane.

    I would never spay a mare I owned that I didn't intend to keep for the rest of her life (I've had some clients spay theirs and circumstances change forcing sale of said spayed mare-when people find out they're spayed it can get very difficult to sell them) YMMV though.
    Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
    Sam: A job? Does it pay?
    Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
    Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2004
    Posts
    7,024

    Default

    Yep, lots of natural estrogen in soy (which is why it's suspected menarche is girls is coming earlier than before...lots of soy products in diets....and why males should limit soy in their diets).

    I had a Saddlebred mare who was always a hussy, winking at the world and peeing near any male...a cute hussy. I had a Fjord mare who LUVED pintos....she got all squishy when any pinto gelding was around.
    "Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc"



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default Spaying Could Help!

    Hi, we have some experience in spaying mares that might be helpful to you. We have spayed two mares with differing outcomes. The first mare we spayed was a Connemara pony, she’s a well trained pony that just became a different horse during her heat cycle. So I know you’ve probably heard from people with vastly different opinions on everything from cost to how invasive it is to recovery. I’ll address all of the different factors we considered. Cost, many people recommend using Regimate as an option. If you have plans of ever wanted to breed the mare, then that certainly is the best option, if however you have no plans on breeding the mare, spaying is a much more cost effective solution. Our vet charges us $300 for the procedure, roughly the cost of Regimate for 1 or 2 months. While it is a very delicate surgery, our vet performs it vaginally, so there are no outside incisions or stitches. There are different techniques for performing this procedure, if your vet isn’t experienced in performing the procedure, definitely check around and find one that is. The procedure is done under a sedative, but the mare is awake and on her feet the entire time. Complete recovery under our vets guidelines takes 3 weeks. The first week it is important to make sure the mare doesn’t lay down. We have a system we use where we basically make a run across the front of a stall. We have a bungee that slides across a rope the mare can still walk back and forth, eat hay, drink, eat, everything but lay down. Week 2-3 we keep her confined to a stall, but gradually increase time out walk and grazing on a lead. After three weeks we resume riding and just gradually build back up. This first mare had one ovary that was about the size of an orange, and one that was about the size of a walnut. Our vet said that was probably what was causing the very strong heat cycles. This mare can now be turned out with geldings and acts calm and is the same every day. We considered it a complete success. The second mare was a Westphalian/Dartmoor cross, she was and still is just generally grumpy all of the time with other horses. She also is a well trained mare and well natured with people. With performed the exact same procedure, the mare hasn’t really changed much. In both of these mares, both ovaries were removed at the same time.
    So from our experience, I would say if you have a mare that only acts really mare-ish during her heat cycle, spaying is definitely a viable option. If you want any more information on our experience, please feel free to call. Hope this helps!
    Richard Jacuzzi
    You can find our contact information at :
    http://www.diamondjequestrian.com



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    2,419

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rjacuzzi View Post
    Hi, we have some experience in spaying mares that might be helpful to you. We have spayed two mares with differing outcomes. The first mare we spayed was a Connemara pony, she’s a well trained pony that just became a different horse during her heat cycle. So I know you’ve probably heard from people with vastly different opinions on everything from cost to how invasive it is to recovery. I’ll address all of the different factors we considered. Cost, many people recommend using Regimate as an option. If you have plans of ever wanted to breed the mare, then that certainly is the best option, if however you have no plans on breeding the mare, spaying is a much more cost effective solution. Our vet charges us $300 for the procedure, roughly the cost of Regimate for 1 or 2 months. While it is a very delicate surgery, our vet performs it vaginally, so there are no outside incisions or stitches. There are different techniques for performing this procedure, if your vet isn’t experienced in performing the procedure, definitely check around and find one that is. The procedure is done under a sedative, but the mare is awake and on her feet the entire time. Complete recovery under our vets guidelines takes 3 weeks. The first week it is important to make sure the mare doesn’t lay down. We have a system we use where we basically make a run across the front of a stall. We have a bungee that slides across a rope the mare can still walk back and forth, eat hay, drink, eat, everything but lay down. Week 2-3 we keep her confined to a stall, but gradually increase time out walk and grazing on a lead. After three weeks we resume riding and just gradually build back up. This first mare had one ovary that was about the size of an orange, and one that was about the size of a walnut. Our vet said that was probably what was causing the very strong heat cycles. This mare can now be turned out with geldings and acts calm and is the same every day. We considered it a complete success. The second mare was a Westphalian/Dartmoor cross, she was and still is just generally grumpy all of the time with other horses. She also is a well trained mare and well natured with people. With performed the exact same procedure, the mare hasn’t really changed much. In both of these mares, both ovaries were removed at the same time.
    So from our experience, I would say if you have a mare that only acts really mare-ish during her heat cycle, spaying is definitely a viable option. If you want any more information on our experience, please feel free to call. Hope this helps!
    Richard Jacuzzi
    You can find our contact information at :
    http://www.diamondjequestrian.com
    Why did you bump 2 OLD threads in one day on the same topic? Smells like advertising to me!



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