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  1. #21
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    May. 9, 2002
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    93

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    No, in principle you shouldn't take a horse to a show when he's been off for three months. But in reality, I don't think two, 2-foot classes are going to kill the horse or even leave him sore.
    However, after three months off I *would* bring a horse back much more slowly than "w-t one day" and "w-t-c the next." My three-day event horse gets time off in the winter and he--like every other event horse I know--gets brought back with LOTS of walking, beginning with 20 min a day and building, and minimal trots, to toughen his legs back up before we do any real work.



  2. #22
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    Dec. 14, 2001
    Location
    Davis, CA
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    2,440

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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kennett Square:
    Very pretty horses. But a kind suggestion from a judges point of view.... Your horse is very pretty and appealing. When you show in the in hand class a pretty leather halter or bridle would certainly enhance all the hard work you've put in her/him. Shining coat and braids, look wonderful but a lovely finishing touch would be an addition of a leather halter or bridle..... Just from a show judges standpoint..... and one opinion remember!

    Good luck and I hope it all works out for you.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I usually show in hunter bridle for inhand classes, but this was on short notice. I did not have time to run back down to the trailer, and since it was a local show, the judge did not seem to mind too much. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    **~~Andrea, Dreamer, Josie~~**
    "If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either."
    Dick Cavett. (IHFLC-Founder)
    Drea



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2001
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    Davis, CA
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sandman:
    No, in principle you shouldn't take a horse to a show when he's been off for three months. But in reality, I don't think two, 2-foot classes are going to kill the horse or even leave him sore.
    However, after three months off I *would* bring a horse back much more slowly than "w-t one day" and "w-t-c the next." My three-day event horse gets time off in the winter and he--like every other event horse I know--gets brought back with LOTS of walking, beginning with 20 min a day and building, and minimal trots, to toughen his legs back up before we do any real work.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    All horses are different. Dream would not benefit from JUST walking, even though I understand why walking intervals are important. He was out all day and all night on uneven terrain (pasture board) on his time off, and that streghtened his legs more than riding would imo. If he was going to be eventing, he would have at LEAST a month to prepare.

    **~~Andrea, Dreamer, Josie~~**
    "If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either."
    Dick Cavett. (IHFLC-Founder)
    Drea



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2000
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    1,914

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    Child, I've been riding 35 years, and have college and post-graduate training in all things horses. People actually pay me for my opinion about the nags.

    And I don't presume to know half as much as you do.

    Yeesh. Your program for getting your horse back in shape is wrong.

    Here's a training tip: Open ears. Close mouth. Learn.

    And pray you never make your parents so mad that they send you up to live with me. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2002
    Location
    Ontario Canada
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    124

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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by HeyYouNags:
    Child, I've been riding 35 years, and have college and post-graduate training in all things horses. People actually pay me for my opinion about the nags.

    And I don't presume to know half as much as you do.

    Yeesh. Your program for getting your horse back in shape is _wrong_.

    Here's a training tip: Open ears. Close mouth. Learn.

    And pray you never make your parents so mad that they send you up to live with me. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    That was uncalled for. That is nice you have college and post graduate degrees. I dont suppose they taught you mannerism at school? Or that golden rule "If you dont have anything nice to say, dont say it at all?"

    If you want to give advice, give it nicely, or else, its not really going to be taken into consideration. Im sure your post did a whole lot of good [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] Gotta Love Those Chestnut Mares With Lots Of Chrome [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]
    Gotta Love Those Chestnut Mares With Lots Of Chrome



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2000
    Location
    Houston, TX
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    2,702

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    Have to agree with the Queen.

    I've always wanted a bay TB Mare!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2001
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    5,379

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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> All horses are different. Dream would not benefit from JUST walking, even though I understand why walking intervals are important. He was out all day and all night on uneven terrain (pasture board) on his time off, and that streghtened his legs more than riding would imo. If he was going to be eventing, he would have at LEAST a month to prepare. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I deleted my first response to earlier in this thread, because Jo said it better. But realistically, while it might not hurt Dream, I wouldn't take even the soundest, fittest horse in the world after barely a week back and three months off. When I, and every upper level event rider I've ever met, bring a horse back from even a month off with no abscess or other injury, we all walk our horses on the roads for quite a while. This is not a "walking interval" nor is it "JUST walking." This is a particular fitness and soundness exercise to leg back up a horse who has been off, to build bone and strengthen tendon. "JUST walking" as you say, is what Mark Todd, Jim Graham, and other international caliber riders do with all of their horses, even incredibly fit horses that have had a month off after completely a three-day.

    Andrea, I've followed your posts with some interest. I'm glad that you've recognized that perhaps you are not ready to listen to any criticism, but part of posting on this board is the exposure to many experienced horsemen/horsewomen who have combined centuries of exposure to horses, horse management, and riding. Perhaps it might not be a bad idea for you to take a big breath when reading responses to your post, and try to see that people are not putting you down, nor are they saying you are a bad person or a poor rider. Instead, most of us are trying to give you some advice based on our own experiences and mistakes. We all make choices in life, and it is possible that people are offering you some perspective, based on their experiences, as to what they have seen, so that you can be better educated about making your choices. The collective horse-knowledge on this board is amazing. I've been working with horses for more than 20 years and I'm still stunned by how little I know, and how much people on this board and in the horse community can teach me.

    Good luck! -GotSpots



  8. #28
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    Jan. 24, 2000
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    The Frozen Tundra
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by *In Your Dreams*:
    All horses are different. Dream would not benefit from JUST walking, even though I understand why walking intervals are important. He was out all day and all night on uneven terrain (pasture board) on his time off, and that streghtened his legs more than riding would imo. If he was going to be eventing, he would have at LEAST a month to prepare.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Well, yes, horses are individuals to a certain extent. So let's give Andrea the benefit of the doubt for the moment -- and find out why she chose the reconditioning program she did.

    Andrea, what do you think are the specific purposes of walking a horse who has been out of work, and why do you think that those purposes were of no value to Dream's reconditioning? What were your goals when bringing Dream back to work? How did you assess his condition and determine that he was ready to jump when you jumped him? How did you evaluate him before and after his excercise to make sure that he was responding appropriately to the work? What specific precautions did you take given his injury and time off?

    These are the things that go into designing a work-plan for a horse who's been laid up. Since you came up with an unconventional one that you say was appropriate for your horse, I'm interested in your reasoning. --Jess



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2001
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    Those special moments come and go...a photographer makes them last a lifetime!
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    I've also heard of a lot worse with the "showing" issue, lol. At least you didn't pound him, you two just had some fun. As long as he's not injured or upset by it, then whatever, right?! I've seen so many horses that hadn't been out of the stall or pasture for 6 months to a year pulled out, aced and taken to shows. Now THAT I don't accept. That's just wrong...but not what you did at all! Don't worry about it, just have fun! Sounds like you guys had a good time.
    Now...of my Pregnant soap box~
    Natalie

    (I need to fix my thingy to 3 weeks and counting...he he) [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif[/img]

    ***4 weeks to go~ WHOO HOO***and my unborn child already has her spurs on....OUCH!!!
    www.kimballphotography.smugmug.com
    ~*~Mom of the wonderful Nikolas aka \"Niko\"~*~
    **Proud member of The Colorful blinb-bling helmet, SCgirls, BGSGand the EquinePhotog (do we have one yet?) cliques**



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
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    15,933

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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Baileybff:
    (I need to fix my thingy to 3 weeks and counting...he he) [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif[/img]
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Somehow my initial reaction to "fix my thingy" did not involve your signature, and was vaguely but inexplicably pornographic. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2001
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    Those special moments come and go...a photographer makes them last a lifetime!
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    before reading any of the posts on this second page, lol. I have to agree with many of the statements made.
    However, I have SEEN worse. Before you jump on her...maybe get all the details first. She's young and bound to make mistakes...this just doesn't seem like a "killer mistake" to me.
    Nat

    ***4 weeks to go~ WHOO HOO***and my unborn child already has her spurs on....OUCH!!!
    www.kimballphotography.smugmug.com
    ~*~Mom of the wonderful Nikolas aka \"Niko\"~*~
    **Proud member of The Colorful blinb-bling helmet, SCgirls, BGSGand the EquinePhotog (do we have one yet?) cliques**



  12. #32
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    Apr. 30, 2001
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by poltroon:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Baileybff:
    (I need to fix my thingy to 3 weeks and counting...he he) [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif[/img]
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Somehow my initial reaction to "fix my thingy" did not involve your signature, and was vaguely but inexplicably pornographic. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Guess maybe I should change that now...so no one else thinks I'm "freaky" LOLOLOL! Too funny~ Nat

    ***4 weeks to go~ WHOO HOO***and my unborn child already has her spurs on....OUCH!!!
    www.kimballphotography.smugmug.com
    ~*~Mom of the wonderful Nikolas aka \"Niko\"~*~
    **Proud member of The Colorful blinb-bling helmet, SCgirls, BGSGand the EquinePhotog (do we have one yet?) cliques**



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2001
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    Davis, CA
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    as hard as I try to listen, and appreciate the advice you give me, I always get defensive. Although I think some of your posts were out of line also. Can we please make this thread informative again, I don't want anything to get out of hand like it did last time.

    Anyways, yes, walking is good. I did not make a mistake taking him to a local show. That, I am certain of. Disagree if you must, but come see my happy, sound, nonsore horse, and THEN make a decision. Please. This is not ment to make anyone mad, or put anyone down, I just want people to think I am decent.

    **~~Andrea, Dreamer, Josie~~**
    "If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either."
    Dick Cavett. (IHFLC-Founder)
    Drea



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2001
    Posts
    539

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    In conditioning--whatever the sport--walking does a great deal. I'm not talking about poking about, but a forward brisk walking pace. No matter what the designated career, walking for extended periods of time after significant time off helps to strengthen ligaments, tendons, and even bone, not to mention muscle. I personally prefer to err on the side of caution with my horses, but you seem to have a program set out for yourself and it hopefully will work well.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2001
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    Davis, CA
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    Walking is a great for horses. I know that. But he did that in the pasture all day and night. Plus, he also had handwalks everyday up the dirt road and back everyday. He was walking fit when I got back on him.

    **~~Andrea, Dreamer, Josie~~**
    "If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either."
    Dick Cavett. (IHFLC-Founder)
    Drea



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2000
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    Warrenton, Virginia
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    2,086

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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by HeyYouNags:
    Child, I've been riding 35 years, and have college and post-graduate training in all things horses. People actually pay me for my opinion about the nags.

    And I don't presume to know half as much as you do.

    Yeesh. Your program for getting your horse back in shape is _wrong_.

    Here's a training tip: Open ears. Close mouth. Learn.

    And pray you never make your parents so mad that they send you up to live with me. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I agree with Kiwi -- very uncalled for and an unfair judgement!

    I don't think that any of you have a reason to jump on Andrea for taking him to a show, none of you are there with her and truly know the situation. I personally know Dream, and I know he is a happy, truly loved and well kept horse.

    I know many of her previous posts did not sit well with most of you, but I know that it takes a lot of guts to come back here and be able to realize that she is wrong. Has she tried to say otherwise? I remember being 13 and always thinking I was right, and I know there was NO way I'd admit otherwise. Its a phase.

    Cut her some slack, her horses could be sitting out in a field unloved and starving! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]

    I ain't got no time for shuckin' and jivin'



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2001
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    Davis, CA
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    thanks. Does anyone have any critiques on Josies confirmation? [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    **~~Andrea, Dreamer, Josie~~**
    "If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either."
    Dick Cavett. (IHFLC-Founder)
    Drea



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2001
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    Davis, CA
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JAGold:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by *In Your Dreams*:
    All horses are different. Dream would not benefit from JUST walking, even though I understand why walking intervals are important. He was out all day and all night on uneven terrain (pasture board) on his time off, and that streghtened his legs more than riding would imo. If he was going to be eventing, he would have at LEAST a month to prepare.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Well, yes, horses are individuals to a certain extent. So let's give Andrea the benefit of the doubt for the moment -- and find out why she chose the reconditioning program she did.

    Andrea, what do you think are the specific purposes of walking a horse who has been out of work, and why do you think that those purposes were of no value to Dream's reconditioning? What were your goals when bringing Dream back to work? How did you assess his condition and determine that he was ready to jump when you jumped him? How did you evaluate him before and after his excercise to make sure that he was responding appropriately to the work? What specific precautions did you take given his injury and time off?

    These are the things that go into designing a work-plan for a horse who's been laid up. Since you came up with an unconventional one that you say was appropriate for your horse, I'm interested in your reasoning. --Jess<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Questions-
    1.)Specific Purposes Of Walking - To Streghthen Tendons Without Exerting Too Much Pressure On The Legs.
    2.)No Purpose For Me- Had Been hand walked on dirt road while injured to keep in some shape. Also was on pasture board while hurt, so he had already walked all day. Trust me, in the pastures we have right now, they can not eat too much grass in one spot.
    3.)Goals When Bringing Dream Back To Work - Making sure that his hoof gave him no further problems.
    Showing him in 2-3 classes at the local show on Saturday.
    4.)Ascess Condition Of Horse- Tendons were clean and tight. NO swelling in the legs. Horse did not loose any muscling because of the hand walking up hill. Lost a little endurance, but not too much is needed for 2 short hunter courses. Also, gained some weight, but he needed to.
    5.)Ready To Jump Because- W/T/C and taking poles fine. You can barely call it a jump, but he took 2 18 inch cavellitis(sp?) on Wednesday. I think.
    6.)Evauluating Before and After Exercise - Made sure his legs were tight and clean, that he did not squirm or show pain when I put the saddle on. Made sure my girth could still fit. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img] He was ready to go when I got on. After 15 minute ride, he was not sweaty, or breathing hard. He was slightly warm. I did not check his pulse because I felt there was no need to.
    7.) I made sure that we stayed off the sand because that is what gave him the abcess. I also did not focus on jumping. Mostly walking/trotting. About 15 seconds(approximentaly) each way. Walked out throughly after wards, and we warmed up longer then usual on a LONG rein so he could strech and get the yawns out. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    I do not believe my training plan was unconventional(out of ordinary). Hand walking for 3 months and pasture keeps a horse in enough shape to handle mild work IMO. I am not an expert.

    **~~Andrea, Dreamer, Josie~~**
    "If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either."
    Dick Cavett. (IHFLC-Founder)

    [This message was edited by *In Your Dreams* on Oct. 08, 2002 at 08:39 PM.]
    Drea



  19. #39
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    Apr. 25, 2000
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by *In Your Dreams*:
    Mostly walking/trotting. About 15 seconds(approximentaly) each way. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    "You might think there would be an explanation for this... but you would be wrong."



  20. #40
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    [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]It was a misprint. Sorry. Walking and Trotting plus about 15 seconds of cantering each way.

    **~~Andrea, Dreamer, Josie~~**
    "If your parents never had children, chances are you won't either."
    Dick Cavett. (IHFLC-Founder)
    Drea



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