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  1. #1

    Default Debating a job offer

    I was offered a job this early last week and am really struggling with whether I should accept it or not so I’m looking for some COTH wisdom (good timing for an OT day!!). I told them I'd respond with a decision by Tuesday.

    I graduated a couple weeks ago with a M.S. I had great grades and several good job and intern experiences while in school. But, I am a recent grad and have relatively little experience compared with other people who have been working full time for several years. I've been sending out applications for a couple months, this is my first offer.

    The job offer is with a great company in an field I’m interested in. The job description listed a few components of the job that sounded really interesting to me as well as some that were significantly less interesting. After talking with the woman who current holds this position, it sounds like the less interesting stuff takes up the majority of her time. Over all though, the job itself sounds pretty good, and the company really is exceptional.

    My big concern is with the location. It’s in a pretty remote, rural area. I don’t necessarily want to live in a huge city, but I would like to live in a mid-size city and that isn’t really an option here. The town I’d live in is small and seemed very quiet based on the time I spent there last week/weekend. Living in a larger city would require a much longer commute and isn’t an option.

    I couldn't afford to ride during college or grad school and would like to get back into it. I did h/j growing up and really want to start showing and riding again. I've googled the area extensively and can't find a barn of any type located within a reasonable distance.

    I feel like it’s ridiculous for me to be considering turning down a good job with a great company because it’s not in a good location, especially in this economy. But, at the same time, I’m not sure I’d enjoy living there at all. I don’t know *anyone* in the area, and I can be very shy and I’m just nervous that I’ll have a really hard time becoming part of such a small community. Plus, taking this job would mean putting off riding and horses for a couple more years.

    Thoughts?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2006
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    2,444

    Default

    I think it speaks pretty well of you to have gotten an offer in just two months of trying.

    With that said, if entry-level positions are hard to come by in your field, I think I'd take this one. The less interesting aspects of the job kinda sound like just "paying your dues" to me.

    But if you decided not to, I'm assuming you'd be able to support yourself easily enough until you found something you think would be better?

    An offer in your field with a great company strikes me as pretty valuable, even considering that the position and location are less than ideal. Maybe you could give it six months or a year and see how it goes? And at that point, you'd at least have a little of that paid experience that others competing for the same positions have.

    A bird in the hand and all that.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,123

    Default

    So the choice boils down to take a great job in a not great location, or continue to be unemployed and hope for something in a better location?

    To me the choice is crystal clear. Take the job. That will give you the experience you need to look for another job in your preferred location. Forget about the riding. (Heresy!). Plan on being at this job for a year or two.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2010
    Posts
    2,235

    Default

    Take the job. There are probably some backyard type barns around if it is in a rural area. IMO rural is much better than city living, but obviously your opinion differers.

    You have a job opportunity, you are a recent graduate, so you take the job for the work experience and keep applying for "the perfect job", or hope and pray for a promotion.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    18,521

    Default

    In this economic climate...take the job. Stay for a year and start your search again (but continue to keep your oar in the water for that first year). Work your butt off at the job, while keeping that old oar in the water, though.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    It comes down to this. Could you stand to live in a more ideal location with a job that's not perfect? Weigh the pros and cons.

    I'm currently an au pair just outside Paris. I really don't like the job (literally I have to remind myself why I'm doing this at least once a day), and I got lucky - I'm with a good family and at least not in the middle of nowhere. OTOH, I am starting to love Paris, and the town I'm living in 25mins from Paris is pretty awesome. I will be very sorry to leave Paris in a few months time, especially the friends I've made here, but will not be sorry at all to leave the job.

    I guess my point is....how important is what you would get out of the job vs. having the ideal lifestyle? How long is the commitment for the job? If you can stick out the location for a year, and you'll be surprised what you can stick out when you put your mind to it, then go for it. If having the ideal job is less important, and you are financially stable enough to be job hunting, then continue looking.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 16, 2002
    Location
    ontario, canada
    Posts
    2,426

    Default

    The toughest part of being a new grad is getting your foot in the door somewhere. I had drinks over the weekend with a few new grads as well as a few friends that have been working for 3-5 years. Same educational qualifications all around, but those of us with a few years under our belts have lots of opportunities, while those just starting out are having a really tough time finding a good gig regardless of geographical location.

    If this is a job that will give you good experience in your field and look good on a resume, accept it. In as little as a year or two, you can always look around for something that is in a better location.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California
    Posts
    4,479

    Default

    I'm with everyone else: take the job. It sounds like a great stepping stone and since you are in a small town without much to do, you should be able to save a lot of money so that when you do move on, it will be that much easier to get back into the world of horses.

    No doubt there are boatloads of recent graduates who would love to have your dilemma.
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2008
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    598

    Default

    I'm a recent grad (2010) myself. I think a lot of it comes down to how long you can hang on before being employed. If you have savings that can last you a year, then I might hold out. If you don't, then I'd absolutely take the job.

    I started looking for a job 4 months before I graduated. It was another 3 months after I graduated that I finally got one. I was a double major with a 3.8 GPA, tons of work experience, looking for a RECEPTIONIST position. Phenomenal references, resume, the works. It was terrifying. A year later, I moved - it took me 10 months to find a new position (again, entry level). I worked as a substitute and babysitter in the meantime. And this wasn't just casual job hunting - this was spending hours checking newspapers, internet, job fairs, job club, etc a day.

    I have friends with BA's who, 2 years after graduating, are still working at McDonalds. (2 friends, actually). Another is working at Starbucks. I think you should consider yourself very lucky - many people are struggling to find ANY sort of job. If this is in your field, and is a job you could see yourself happy with for a year or so (you don't have to stay there forever) then I'd give it serious, serious thought.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,431

    Default

    If the job is in a rural area, I find it hard to imagine that there isn't some riding somewhere close-by. And probably for a lot less money than riding at some barn close to some metropolis would be. It may not be your ideal riding discipline/situation, but as a person just starting out in the working world, probably much more affordable than it would be trying ride and live in a city somewhere.
    -Debbie / NH

    My Blog: http://deborahsulli.blogspot.com/



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2003
    Posts
    3,815

    Default

    because it’s not in a good location

    You might very well end up liking the area a lot more than you think right now. Try out some of the things that the new area has to offer than you might not get elsewhere, too.

    can't find a barn of any type located within a reasonable distance

    If it's more rural, someone must have horses somewhere. Cranky (above) is so right that you might find things a lot cheaper, which is wonderful.

    If you want to tell us where, we can help you look, perhaps.

    I'm a h/j rider who's ended up in a mostly western QH barn due to location and it's actually really cool. I'm now a true QH fan.

    Take the job. And Big Congrautulations to you !



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2008
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    598

    Default

    Another thought: some of the best barns I've found, have been smaller, unadvertised barns that I've come across by either word of mouth, or by posting ads to the effect of "will work in exchange for ride time" in local papers or Craigslist (yes, always screen carefully!!). I'm sure there are barns - you just might not be aware of them.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2005
    Posts
    935

    Default

    Reinforcing the "take the job!" In this market, any job that is willing to pay you is worth celebrating. You're young - right now is the grunt period of life. That means you may not have the ideal living/riding/social/etc situation but the good news is that it only serves as incentive to keep working to move up. You can't start at the top : )


    Unless you have the resources to keep looking for a job (with better location, riding, etc) for the next six, eight, or twelve months - I'd take it.

    Go girl!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2010
    Location
    Down South
    Posts
    810

    Default

    Take the job. Cheaper prices, you'll get good experience, and you won't have to worry about money running out.

    Also, smaller rural towns, IMHO, are actually *more* accommodating to new/single people. They understand there's not a lot to do, and you'll be new, so they'll probably help you get settled in, make suggestions, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paige777 View Post
    Another thought: some of the best barns I've found, have been smaller, unadvertised barns that I've come across by either word of mouth, or by posting ads to the effect of "will work in exchange for ride time" in local papers or Craigslist (yes, always screen carefully!!). I'm sure there are barns - you just might not be aware of them.
    Bingo.

    I live in BFE. And I looked for about 2 months before I finally found a couple of good places that were within an hour of where I lived. But once I got my foot in the horsey door, so to speak, I started finding all sorts of other places, and even found a dressage judge who did lessons and a couple of good barns near where I work -- which is something I just could not find out about online. I had to ask around and meet people.

    I'd even post a Craigslist ad asking about facilities/barns, etc. *now* and see if you can't start finding out info and calling around. You may be surprised. Granted, you may have to commute there, but it's better than nothing.
    The dude abides ...



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2008
    Posts
    351

    Default

    Our stories are pretty similar.
    I took the job and here's how it's working out for me...
    -because it's a rural area, pasture board is dirt cheap. So I did keep the horses. But not much in the way of instruction and they are basically in a farmers field so wintertime riding is limited. Still, it's better than nothing!
    -I ended up loving the people I work with. Because the area is less desirable than most, they are mostly a young, progressive bunch on their first or second jobs out of university. I've been here a year and have gotten close to $10 an hour worth of raises/promotions, which would have taken me 5 years plus in a more desirable location.
    -there is nothing stopping me from continuing to apply for the dream jobs.In the meantime I'm only getting more experienced and getting a stronger resume.
    -I do miss my friends very much. I'm shy and quiet so it does take me a while to meet new friends. My social life kind of stinks
    -I was worried that I would be "trapped" here by not wanting to go through the stress of moving and starting a new job again. The opposite is true- I feel like if I did it once I can do it again!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    517

    Default

    Hey OP, I'm with the others from your description it sounds like the right move to take the job.

    You're always in a better position to get a job when you're currently employed, it isn't fair but that's how it is. There's only so many questions you can ask, you won't know what this is like unless you actually try the job for several months. Same goes for the town. Even if the job turns out to be not so great, you'll have a better idea of how to spot what you don't want in the next job.

    I disagree with some of the posters about working for a year or two and putting off riding. For me, my motivation to work hard was sustained by having small amounts of doing what I love: riding. You may not be able to find a hunter/jumper barn and showing but no doubt you'll be able to find some sort of horsey time. Even if its just trail riding in the bush or a different discipline. However limited their will be more riding opportunities than if you took a job in the heart of a big city, which is where many new grads end up.

    Socially, yes there will be limitations compared to a big city but you may find that you do get to know people better. A big city can be quite isolating too. And its not the quantity of people available but whether you 'click' with the individuals you might come across, you won't know that until you try.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2012
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Thank you all for the feedback! I should have mentioned in my OP that I am employed right now. It's a student funded position and can go through the end of August, so I do have a few more months before I really need to have something lined up. But, of course in this economy, it's entirely possible I could search and apply for things without getting another offer.

    This town is <3,000 people and is the biggest town for about 1 1/2 hours. So... it's pretty small! The company makes up a fair number of those people, so hopefully I'll make some friends at work. I'm also worried about finding a good vet for my dog in that small of a town. He has a complex health condition and he's doing well now, but I know it's only because I have such a fabulous vet that's taking care of him.

    I know I should take this job, and I probably will, I guess I'm just sad that I didn't find a job in a place I'm excited to move to and where I can look forward to riding. Being able to ride soon has been such a huge motivator for me while I was in school. I worked SO hard to be able to graduate debt free so that a horse could be in the near future, I'm just really struggling with making the decision to take this job knowing that it likely means putting off horses for a couple more years.

    I posted on COTH a few weeks ago with the location of the job looking for any leads on potential barns (h/j or otherwise!) and the few people who were familiar with the area said that it's a very poor part of the state and it would be highly unlikely that I'd be able to find a trainer of any sort in any discipline. Since I haven't ridden in several years and would probably be buying a young or green (i.e. cheaper!) horse I know that if I'm going to get back into horses I'll need a competent trainer to help me.



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